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And your choice of boat.
 

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I'm meeting more and more guys, 73 and up into their 80's these days, it seems. I sincerely believe living beyond the smog and pressures of society will prolong one's life, and the exercise of sailing, though not overly strenuous, cannot help but to keep one much fitter than a couch potato who plays golf several times a week.
With a few accommodations, I don't see why, as we age, we need consider retiring from sailing. I believe a lot of cruisers look down their noses at my electric gene winches, but they probably will add a decade to my sailing adventures. Now if I could just find a side accommodation ladder, I might just make it to 90 or more.
 

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Cruising is the most healthy lifestyle I have ever seen.
Very little stress, great food, constant motion on a monohull, clean air, other healthy people, good exercise. It has it all.

As for the winch grinding, its an excellent workout when actually sailing, but cruising is just generally healthy :)
 

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Wow! I just need to get on my old tub sitting in the canal out back and head off into the sunrise. Anyone wanna buy a house on the water in FL?:):):)
 

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I think it depends on how bothered you are about slapping halyards.... :p ;)
 

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TROUBLE
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Cruising is the most healthy lifestyle I have ever seen.
Very little stress, great food, constant motion on a monohull, clean air, other healthy people, good exercise. It has it all.

As for the winch grinding, its an excellent workout when actually sailing, but cruising is just generally healthy :)
Note that Mark doesn't mention riding out hurricanes or losing his forestay in the middle of the ocean.....

I'm just saying it isn't quite as stress-free as it sounds. How about 3 nights in a row, at anchor off Monument Hill in the Exumas, with strong T-Storms and lightening all around (and VERY, VERY, VERY, close)? Hey, it's not always like this, but it does happen....and it is quite stressful. Still, plenty of days in paradise with beautiful sunsets, sundowners with friends, and very little stress.

Cruising is generally healthy, as Mark says. That does not include living on a boat, tied up to a dock. So, since you ask about sailing (not cruising), I'm not sure you are getting correct responses to you question. It looks like in the link, they are talking about Americas Cup crew. Those guys are athletes, and train hard every day.

Ralph
 

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Back when I used to borrow a Shields occasionally for a one-design race (M'head, long ago), there was this old guy with nonfunctioning legs and some sort of skin condition so had to wear this big floppy hat, he looked like "potato man" as they lowered him into the boat with a crane (true). He wasn't able to move about, just stayed on one side, at the tiller while crew kept the boat balanced and did what he said.

And beat the p*ss out the rest of us, he could smell the wind.

So was he physically healthy? No, but maybe sailing kept him from getting worse. It's a lifelong sport, and in a keel boat with a crew, arms and your senses are about all you need, and experience.

Yeah, I think sailing is stress relief, which may help us live longer. And exercise, at least some, sometimes a lot. But mostly what I think is whatever our health, as long as we can still sail regardless of physical health, it's something worth living for, because we love it. So it's mental health.
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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Note that Mark doesn't mention riding out hurricanes or losing his forestay in the middle of the ocean.....

I'm just saying it isn't quite as stress-free as it sounds. How about 3 nights in a row, at anchor off Monument Hill in the Exumas, with strong T-Storms and lightening all around (and VERY, VERY, VERY, close)? Hey, it's not always like this, but it does happen....and it is quite stressful. Still, plenty of days in paradise with beautiful sunsets, sundowners with friends, and very little stress.

Cruising is generally healthy, as Mark says. That does not include living on a boat, tied up to a dock. So, since you ask about sailing (not cruising), I'm not sure you are getting correct responses to you question. It looks like in the link, they are talking about Americas Cup crew. Those guys are athletes, and train hard every day.

Ralph
If this makes any sense, there is stress and there is stress. We have had our share of problems sailing, including getting hit by lightning, but you feel more in control of things than with the stress you get in the city - traffic, boss who is a PITA, etc. With experience you realize that you can fix things and the stress becomes less of a problem and just a reality of the lifestyle. i think if everything was perfect all the time it would not be nearly as fulfilling a lifestyle. Then again, there are the people who go to one place (Georgetown and parts of the San Blas are good examples) and are indeed happy with as little stress as they can find.

I think the article is of little help since, as was pointed out, those guys are elite athletes in the peak of their life. Not like the rest of us. I am inspired as Capta mentioned by those guys in their 80s who are doing a great job of cruising. We have an 80 year old friend who sailed around Cape Agluhas in South Africa with a symmetric spinnaker up (he is a long-time racer) on a 48 footer with just his wife for crew. Of course, it was a ketch so the sail was a bit smaller.
 

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Note that Mark doesn't mention riding out hurricanes or losing his forestay in the middle of the ocean.....

I'm just saying it isn't quite as stress-free as it sounds. How about 3 nights in a row, at anchor off Monument Hill in the Exumas, with strong T-Storms and lightening all around (and VERY, VERY, VERY, close)? Hey, it's not always like this, but it does happen....and it is quite stressful.

Ralph
Your 3 days of stress out of 365
My last hurricane 1 day stress from 365
forestay snap = 5 days stress from 365
Pirate avenue 15 days intense stress, 30 days high stress, 180 days stress = 235 days stress out of 365
Cyclone in 2009 3 days stress out of 365
So about a total of 250 days stress out of 1,300 days.

Compare that to working in the jam factory 40 hours a week for life....


BTW I am sitting here listening to some guy singing italian opera. Amazing :)
 

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Sailing is definitely healthy, both for the body and the mind. Forces you to be active and sharp. Still, it is more about quality not quantity of life - and sailing delivers here as well... :)
 

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TROUBLE
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Compare that to working in the jam factory 40 hours a week for life....


BTW I am sitting here listening to some guy singing italian opera. Amazing :)
Don't get me wrong Mark. Hey, you're kind of my hero in a way. We're still pretty new at this cruising and the new "life" we are living (2 years since selling our house, and all the stuff).

We love having our boat as home, and don't have any desires to move back on land. But you have to admit, *your* stress days are a bit different than that guy working in the jam factory.

I have some friends that broke the prop shaft on their 49' Transpac crossing the Gulf of Mexico. Almost lost the boat when the shaft, prop and all went into the deep. He was able to stop the ingress of water with a ziplock bag and some tie wraps. Happily, they are living the good life down in Panama these days.

I sure don't mean to put out a negative vibe about cruising. I kind of look at it more as an adventure, because many days are just that. At our age (62), it has been a new life for us. Sure beats sitting in front of the TV, or rocking the day away on your front porch.

PS - I'm pretty hard core! No windlass or AP. My wife may be the first mate....but I'm ANCHOR MAN!!!




Ralph
 

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I actually thought sailing was gonna shorten my lifespan when my wife discovered I bought a sailboat. ;)
Hah hah! Ditto....

I remember well last fall when the PO and I were struggling to get the boat and trailer down a narrow alley and backed into the spot beside the garage. My wife sat in the kitchen with a glass of Chardonnay, looking out the window and glaring at me.

Fortunately after her first sail this summer she changed her mind.
 

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I think the constant motion and having to move around helps keep one healthy. Add to this the constant up and down the companionway, in and out of the dinghy, jugging water, diesel and ship supplies all lead to being active and fit. Not to mention the sailing activities of winch grinding, raising and trimming sails and the occasional long bouts at the helm when the AP quits or the conditions are a bit sporty. also being surrounded by water leads to other sporting activities:swimming, snorkeliing,diving, beach combing... etc. Having no schedule ensures late morning lie ins and the afternoon nana nap. fresh air, a bit of sun, good food, what more could you ask for? sure a few stressful days to keep you on your toes...
 

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There may be something to sailing making for longer life if anybody remembers last month Iposted about my dads new to him sSpencer he wants to sail to Alaska next summer he signed the deal on his 90th birthday his biggest problem his hearing aid batteries only last two days per battery ( I don't think that's really a problem)
 

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Not if you talk funny language like #*@!!$## whenever you work on the engine or riggings.
 
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