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Congrats on the puppy!

My 55-lb boxer comes sailing with us. She's happy in the cockpit as long as we put yoga mats on the seats so she can walk around without slipping. I keep her in a PFD and leashed to the binnacle while we are underway. I thought the noise of the sails and movement of the boat would bother her, but she's actually fine with everything except people coming too close to us while we are at anchor (grr...).

She won't do her business on the boat (I tried, she held it for 3 days) so getting her to shore to do her business is a bit of a pain but mostly because much of the shoreline is private, so we have to plan our anchorages carefully. However, I find anchorages are more fun with my dog with me to keep me company, so it balances out.

My Pearson does not have a sugar scoop stern, that sure would be handy getting a 55 lb pup into a dinghy, we experimented with a bunch of ways and finally use a pully system off the boom, lashed to her life vest, and one person in the dinghy and one on board to guide her in. She doesn't love it, but she does love going places in the dinghy, so she tolerates it.
 

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Our Jack Russel Shorty "Skipper" is just the size for us, 16lbs and loves his dinghy rides and being included on the boat. Don't even mention how he loves a beach where we can throw his floating stick for him to endlessly fetch it.

Took him on the boat the first weekend we got him from the breeder although we never left the dock, just let him get used to the boat and some motion. Went out for our normal weekends on the hook and he has been good, have an artificial grass patch that I put up by the anchor, where I can use the wash down hose to clean off any thing that remains. Also got him a better life vest from BayDog that has great support and am putting up lifeline netting just to keep him safe.

Skipper is extra work but won't want to be without him, and he definitely wants to be included...

Jeff
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My girl tossed an anchor at me that may limit future cruising. My girlfriend (for all practical purposes wife) wanted a dog. I love dogs, but know life is easier without them. And I told her what I thought but also I would not stop her from getting one, and would be nice to it if she got one. So she got a pup, and having been just removed from his mother and siblings and the only humans it knew, it was really upset and confused when it first came home.

We let him sleep with us the first night, and it fell out of bed in the pitch black and started to weep, if a dog can weep. My girlfriend picked him up to comfort him, but he pulled away and came to me. He held his head to my chest and stopped sobbing and we fell asleep with his head on my chest. Long story short, he is now my dog, or I am his human.

So he is 50% German Shepard, and the other half roughly equally Great Pyrenees and Rottweiler. So not a small dog: he turns 6 months next week and is 70lbs. So I see nothing but pitfalls in taking him sailing. Maybe day sailing not so much, but I see cruising, even weekend cruising as a problem. The upside, he is a really smart dog, and he can hold going to the bathroom for a long time - ten or twelve hours.

Does anyone here cruise with a dog or know anyone that does? I am hoping it is not as bad as I imagine.
Well, we do weekends and 4 day trips...we use a trusted Rover person, as we only have a 30' sloop, and a medium size dog, but he is high energy and a complete pain in the ass on board. For a long term cruise, sometimes it's tough for the dog, separation anxiety. So, how long are your get a ways, and how well does you dog behave? You can always do a few trials to see how practical it is. I know one gal & mate that take off for longer times...they give their fur baby to a family member the doggy knows well...There's a will, there's a way. We will not be doing any long cruises, not in the cards for us, but i am somewhat familiar with your dilemma. Good luck with it.
 

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Sweet story. You realize that the dog will now sleep in your bed, or rather he will allow you to sleep in his bed, pretty much forever, right? I made the same mistake with my cute little puppy and now I sleep on 1/4 of my bed!

I imagine sailing with a dog will be a lot like sailing with children, mostly fun but intermittently annoying. Just take the time to train him how to behave on the boat. Don’t just think he’ll figure it out on his own. A well trained dog is a happy dog. Our plan is to introduce our dog slowly, take him on the boat for short periods while docked, play with him- lots of praise and lots of treats so he associates the boat with fun and happiness, and show him where he can be and where he can’t, then slowly introduce things like starting the motor and moving the boat. The last thing you want is for his first experience to scare him- you may never be able to train that fear out of him.


I lost my 15 year old Old English Sheepdog about a year and a half ago. He was not a sailor ( sorry, Scuppers is a lie). Anyway when I recovered enough to think about getting a new dog we specifically looked for a breed that would work well on a sailboat. We ended up with a mini Australian Shepard. He’s only about 45 pounds but an absolutely amazing athlete, ladders don’t phase him at all. And he’s absolutely happy to do anything we’re doing, so hopefully it’ll work well. This will be our first summer sailing with him. We are currently shopping for a PFD for him if anyone has any suggestions.


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This is my 55lb boxer mix, he was pretty skeptical at first but within 10 minutes or so didn't even care he had it on. This is when he first got introduced to it prior to leaving the dock. Obviously he wasn't thrilled lol. This is the Monterey Bay Offshore Pet Life Jacket. I have not used it to hoist him yet but I have no doubt it would hold, it appears to be very well made and heavy duty, For transparency, I have no affiliation with either Monterey Bay Pet Life Jackets or West Marine.
20210321_113809.jpg
 

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My 50lb shephard collie cross was with me 24/7 for 20 + years. Every morning at 0700 i'd take her ashore. Every night at 1900 i'd take her shore, horizontal rain, 4' waves ... she had to go ashore (she would not do it onboard). I miss that dog every day .... but would never have another.
 
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used to take our german sheppard along to cruises into canada west coast vancouver island. he probably saved my life when i got lost in the bush around hot springs cove. i didn't know any more where i was. i told the dog to guide me back and he did. you won't believe it, but it's the truth. in the bush up there every direction looks the same. he also jumped off the boat at the fuel dock at bamfield and got into a fight with the local fuel dock dog. he also caught a mouse we collected somewhere and somehow lived in our wood pile we had for firewood for the cook stove. he was a wonderful dog, long passed on and it is a tragedy that they only live short lives compared to our lifetimes. you get to love them and then they get white around their muzzles, get arthitis, get blind and loose their hearing just like me now. i almost start to cry now thinking of all my dogs i had to bury.
 
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My girl tossed an anchor at me that may limit future cruising. My girlfriend (for all practical purposes wife) wanted a dog. I love dogs, but know life is easier without them. And I told her what I thought but also I would not stop her from getting one, and would be nice to it if she got one. So she got a pup, and having been just removed from his mother and siblings and the only humans it knew, it was really upset and confused when it first came home.

We let him sleep with us the first night, and it fell out of bed in the pitch black and started to weep, if a dog can weep. My girlfriend picked him up to comfort him, but he pulled away and came to me. He held his head to my chest and stopped sobbing and we fell asleep with his head on my chest. Long story short, he is now my dog, or I am his human.

So he is 50% German Shepard, and the other half roughly equally Great Pyrenees and Rottweiler. So not a small dog: he turns 6 months next week and is 70lbs. So I see nothing but pitfalls in taking him sailing. Maybe day sailing not so much, but I see cruising, even weekend cruising as a problem. The upside, he is a really smart dog, and he can hold going to the bathroom for a long time - ten or twelve hours.

Does anyone here cruise with a dog or know anyone that does? I am hoping it is not as bad as I imagine.
Hmmm. Six month male, I’m. It sure he will be easy to train to this so late or not, but here’s what I did. First of all, I got a small dog. Second I got one that does not shed. But that means a lot of grooming so there’s a trade off. Now for the sailing parts. You did the most important already which is to get him on the boat immediately and used to the sounds feelings, and lights of sailing. My previous dog I didn’t take out early enough and then took him on a race. He never ever liked it. My current dog is very happy on the boat. The next thing I did was train her to eliminate on artificial turf both at home, on the road, and on the boat. Now I just put the turf down on the sole in the cockpit and she squats and goes immediately. When she’s finished I throw the feces overboard (or in the head), rinse the turf, and stow it in a wet cockpit locker. No problem. When sailing she wears a life jacket at all times (as do I). When it’s rough, she gets her leash attached to the jack lines as mine is. If it’s very rough and I don’t have duties, she gets harnessed to me and put in her sling which I strap around me. I also give her special treats and meals she does not get at home. She has got to the point where she is happy to take a stroll with me to the bow in fine weather. All that said, we cruise on a fat, heavy LittleHarbor 45 with a whale bottom body and centerboard. We don’t go to weather and there is very little heel on our boat. Taking the dog on our TP52 or the STP 65 for practice or delivery heeled over with 12 guys on the rail was never happy. And in rough weather neither the dog nor I is happy. No one is. On a fine day, she loves it.
 

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Hmmm. Six month male, I’m. It sure he will be easy to train to this so late or not, but here’s what I did. First of all, I got a small dog. Second I got one that does not shed. But that means a lot of grooming so there’s a trade off. Now for the sailing parts. You did the most important already which is to get him on the boat immediately and used to the sounds feelings, and lights of sailing. My previous dog I didn’t take out early enough and then took him on a race. He never ever liked it. My current dog is very happy on the boat. The next thing I did was train her to eliminate on artificial turf both at home, on the road, and on the boat. Now I just put the turf down on the sole in the cockpit and she squats and goes immediately. When she’s finished I throw the feces overboard (or in the head), rinse the turf, and stow it in a wet cockpit locker. No problem. When sailing she wears a life jacket at all times (as do I). When it’s rough, she gets her leash attached to the jack lines as mine is. If it’s very rough and I don’t have duties, she gets harnessed to me and put in her sling which I strap around me. I also give her special treats and meals she does not get at home. She has got to the point where she is happy to take a stroll with me to the bow in fine weather. All that said, we cruise on a fat, heavy LittleHarbor 45 with a whale bottom body and centerboard. We don’t go to weather and there is very little heel on our boat. Taking the dog on our TP52 or the STP 65 for practice or delivery heeled over with 12 guys on the rail was never happy. And in rough weather neither the dog nor I is happy. No one is. On a fine day, she loves it.
She doesn’t much care if she goes on the artificial turf or land. when we dock, she does like to run around on land. But she would never jump off to get to land and we don’t ever feel pressure that we have to get her to land for her bodily functions.
 

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Does anyone here cruise with a dog or know anyone that does? I am hoping it is not as bad as I imagine.
People love their dogs and dogs love their people. You are in that group or not. But when in the early morning at a quiet anchorage with only a couple boats I see someone going ashore in unpleasant conditions I know it isn't so the person can "go" ashore. And then there are the boat dogs that will always bark at a passing dinghy or boat. Yes I understand to them that is their "job", but really they bark at every one every time. And then there are the dogs that go all crazy with their people are away and bark all day till they come back. Every one loves those daogs.

So if you are in the "people who love their dogs and whose dogs loves them" it is maybe "not as bad as imagined". But if not, it is worst!

IMO as while I like dogs I just don't ever see myself loving one enough to have in a house with me, let alone a boat.
 

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Hi. We wouldn’t consider sailing (or anything else) without our dogs with us. We have usually had two dogs, but cruised six months with three dogs, two Golden retrievers and a border collie, on our 34 foot pilothouse ketch. Our current dogs are trained to relieve themselves on command and are fine doing it on deck. We don’t use Astro turf or any other placebo mat, just throw a bucket of sea water on it and the deck’s clean again. We love our canine crew and don’t consider any of their needs onerous. I say enjoy your furry buddy’s company!
 

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My girl tossed an anchor at me that may limit future cruising. My girlfriend (for all practical purposes wife) wanted a dog. I love dogs, but know life is easier without them. And I told her what I thought but also I would not stop her from getting one, and would be nice to it if she got one. So she got a pup, and having been just removed from his mother and siblings and the only humans it knew, it was really upset and confused when it first came home.

We let him sleep with us the first night, and it fell out of bed in the pitch black and started to weep, if a dog can weep. My girlfriend picked him up to comfort him, but he pulled away and came to me. He held his head to my chest and stopped sobbing and we fell asleep with his head on my chest. Long story short, he is now my dog, or I am his human.

So he is 50% German Shepard, and the other half roughly equally Great Pyrenees and Rottweiler. So not a small dog: he turns 6 months next week and is 70lbs. So I see nothing but pitfalls in taking him sailing. Maybe day sailing not so much, but I see cruising, even weekend cruising as a problem. The upside, he is a really smart dog, and he can hold going to the bathroom for a long time - ten or twelve hours.

Does anyone here cruise with a dog or know anyone that does? I am hoping it is not as bad as I imagine.
I’ve been sailing for almost 50 years. I’ve been cruising with our beagle Jasmine for 3 weeks. We adapt. She adapts. It’s great.
 
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Hi. We wouldn’t consider sailing (or anything else) without our dogs with us. We have usually had two dogs, but cruised six months with three dogs, two Golden retrievers and a border collie, on our 34 foot pilothouse ketch. Our current dogs are trained to relieve themselves on command and are fine doing it on deck. We don’t use Astro turf or any other placebo mat, just throw a bucket of sea water on it and the deck’s clean again. We love our canine crew and don’t consider any of their needs onerous. I say enjoy your furry buddy’s company!
My dog does eliminate on command. I thought I trained her to astroturf. But maybe that's just for me because she will go on almost any surface if I give her the command. I could try that on the boat. But I do have the little piece of turf. Hahaha. Joke's probably on me.
 

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People love their dogs and dogs love their people. You are in that group or not. But when in the early morning at a quiet anchorage with only a couple boats I see someone going ashore in unpleasant conditions I know it isn't so the person can "go" ashore. And then there are the boat dogs that will always bark at a passing dinghy or boat. Yes I understand to them that is their "job", but really they bark at every one every time. And then there are the dogs that go all crazy with their people are away and bark all day till they come back. Every one loves those daogs.

So if you are in the "people who love their dogs and whose dogs loves them" it is maybe "not as bad as imagined". But if not, it is worst!

IMO as while I like dogs I just don't ever see myself loving one enough to have in a house with me, let alone a boat.
Even dog lovers can't stand barking dogs. I have always found it pretty easy to train my dog to not bark unless there is a reason. In fact, it's why I have my medical service dog. If she barked at everyone that went by the boat, she'd be useless to me. People who frequently must leave their dog all day probably shouldn't have a dog. That said, there are times the dog must stay at home. I haven't experienced that on the boat. I imagine she would howl. She is almost never alone, nor am I.
 

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I love dogs but I've never had a real barker until my latest. Man she is the cutest little bulldog but she barks at every passing person. I can get her to stop barking, but not to never start barking. Talked to my dog trainer and he was like 'you got a bulldog, what did you expect'. I never had any sympathy for people with barking dogs until this one.
 

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I met a girl today who has had a rabbit since living in a college dorm and is now on a boat
The rabbit is house/boat trained...and can swim
 

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I love dogs but I've never had a real barker until my latest. Man she is the cutest little bulldog but she barks at every passing person. I can get her to stop barking, but not to never start barking. Talked to my dog trainer and he was like 'you got a bulldog, what did you expect'. I never had any sympathy for people with barking dogs until this one.
Hmmmm. I don't know about bulldogs. But I have a toy poodle, a bread which the general public thinks is a constant barker or "yappy". She is my fifth one. None of them barked unless it was for acceptable notice. They all gave only one bark for someone at the door. No barks on the boat. No barks in the car. Sometimes excited barks if they were off leash but that is when they felt least secure. On leash barks and indoor repeated barks only to alert me of my medical problem. I'd check another dog trainer before giving up on your dog barking. You don't say how old your dog is either. It can take up to two years to completely train a dog on barking. And then you need reinforcement over the years. First, acknowledge the bark and praise/treat for the first bark. Then say Stop! to get the dog to stop and praise treat to stop. If it starts up again after that for the same trigger, sternly tell it Stop! Then praise/treat for stopping. Repeat, repeat, repeat. Later, if the dog barks for something you want it to ignore, don't praise for barking, say Stop! and praise/treat for stopping. Repeat, repeat, repeat. Eventually, the dog learns that barking is a means of communication and which alerts you want him to give based on what barks get treated and NOT Stopped and what Stop gets treated without the bark getting treated. It is complicated for the dog to learn this so patience and not giving up is important. The thing that's impossible to stop is the noise the dog makes when you aren't around. Let me know if you find a cure for that. My dogs have all sung when left alone. I've tried hiding and returning to get them to stop, but it's so hard to repeat, repeat, repeat that and they just fall back to singing which does annoy the neighbors.
 
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