SailNet Community banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I will hold my hands up and fully admit to having double standards here.

We are continually reassessing what should and should not be on the boat for space. Do we really need this or that and why should my wife need more that one dress and one pair of shoes.

When it comes to boat bits things are different. I can't seem to throw away a bit of old line, an old pump or nearly anything boat related. We have got so many pieces of old line (I have hidden around the boat).

Is it just me who hoards old boat bits and lines "just in case" or can you easily throw things away?
 

·
Wandering Aimlessly
Joined
·
22,037 Posts
If I need the space for something I need more ... out it goes. Otherwise, why toss things you might need that you've already paid for?
 
  • Like
Reactions: zeehag

·
Registered
1981 Endeavour 32
Joined
·
1,068 Posts
I know what you mean! For me there are some things I can part with easily - old bilge pumps and float switches come to mind - and then some things that seem to collect forever, like old hose clamps, lengths of line of various sizes and conditions, and pretty much anything stainless no matter how random it is.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,517 Posts
I feel that the inability to throw away a "boat bit" comes from fear of future breakage, or at a minimum, lack of trust in your equipment quality. Let me elaborate

If you keep up with scheduled and proactive maintenance, I'd have no fear of getting rid of an old busted out pump. Its when you're letting your current pump run along with that weird sound or well past its rebuild window is when you feel the need to hang on to the older part just in case you need to rebuild on the cheap.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,181 Posts
I have no double standard - I hoard everything, and that includes high mileage shoes (but once they get seriously moldy, I do toss them into trash).
 

·
Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
Joined
·
4,526 Posts
I am getting so much old line onboard I have to do something drastic. The tipping point was being tied up in Cape Town for a winter in an area famous (infamous) for the 50 knot winds that are pretty common. We had a boat keeper who kept an eye on things and added extra lines as necessary. When we returned to Africa we had 13 (13!) lines holding the boat and most of them had suffered at least some chafe. I think we managed to throw out three that were beyond salvation but a little nip and cut and I keep all of them along with other dock lines I already had. I think when we get back to North AmericaI will get nasty and throw out a lot of old stuff - at least I think I will.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,647 Posts
If it's a mechanical piece, then clearly I replaced it for a reason (i.e., it's broken). If I can't fix it, then it's trashed. If I can, then it gets stored at home as a spare. Same thing for old line. I keep some on the boat in a dedicated rope locker, the rest is in the attic. Attic line gets made into things like rope mats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
At twenty eight feet I am short of space so I continually sort out the boat! The pirate in me lets me wonder How the boat will perform with extra junk aboard. And where would I put a treasure if I ever got one! Dale
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
If it's a mechanical piece, then clearly I replaced it for a reason (i.e., it's broken). If I can't fix it, then it's trashed. If I can, then it gets stored at home as a spare. Same thing for old line. I keep some on the boat in a dedicated rope locker, the rest is in the attic. Attic line gets made into things like rope mats.
Impellas.. I change them every year. They look fine when I change them so I keep them... just in case one fails.. oh and the new back up I have, Oh and the new back up to the back up... Do you think I can make a modern art thing of all the impellas I have aboard.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
712 Posts
When we got the boat, there where enough bags of spare lines to outfit an entire boat. However, they were all frayed and worn. I'm replacing all lines with this mast refit I'm doing now. OUT with the old, in with the new. But at first it was hard to just toss things (until the wife started making our boat our second home. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
181 Posts
I usually throw out old junk. Potential replacements are stored shoreside except for critical things like replacement Vbelts or impellers. I like keeping sailing simple and too much junk on board degrades my enjoyment.

I will acknowledge that most people keep everything, even broken stuff. It's very educational to go boat shopping early in the season, before people have really had a chance to prepare their boat for sale. When I'm shopping for a used boat one of the first things I'll look for is the junk box. The junk box will tell you all the stuff that has been broken and sometimes reveal how much abuse the boat has suffered. An orderly storage of spares and a lack of junk seems to be a good indication of proper seamanship, maintenance, and generally Bristol fashion.

GTJ
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,028 Posts
One of the very best ways to make a boat both faster and bigger is to clean her out. The designer did not allow for 2 extra rusted bilge pumps and duplicate out-of-date electronics. Excepting safety equipment...


What I keep.
* If you didn't use it last year, take it home. You can always bring it back.
* Certain vital spare, fine. But the really vital stuff probably fits in a shoe box AND it does not include used parts.
* Blocks and shackles that have been swapped-out when re-rigging may be OK, particularly snatch blocks. Something may break, and you never know when you might get bored and experiment with some rig change.
* Enough lines to dock and warp, sail ties, and perhaps 50' of asorted bits that will come in handy when something needs repair.
* One or two trays of nuts, bolts, screws, and pins. Some wiring tools and bits.
* Some tools, but use some sense here; not stuff for projects, only important repairs.

What I pitch.
* Anything not used in two years.
* Used parts. Ick. Either rebuild RIGHT NOW it and bag it (and then leave it at home) or strip a few bits that you KNOW to fail and pitch the rest.
* Old rope. I do keep it at home, as it is often handy for projects.
* Power tools (on a drill is on-board). I have tons... at home.
* Old PFDs. All they are good for is getting fined.
* Old flares. With cell phones, lights, and AIS, what is the point?
* Certainly not old paint cans. Any.
* Dried up cleaning supplies. In fact, most cleaning supplies.
* Toys the kids have out-grown.
* Books you won't read again.
* Old power cords.

If you think you need a spare, as many have said, that might be because your maintenance needs an up-grade.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
When you live on a boat like we do it is your home. There is no garage to put it in and repairs sometimes have to be made out of what you have. When that happens and you have no home marina everything is useful
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
9,071 Posts
In only the last 3 years, I have repaired, designed and built or modified probably 20 things on the boat. 99% of what I needed came from stuff that was stashed aboard; usually as leftovers from something broken, or a project.
I often get jobs done without purchasing anything from ashore, having numerous screws, bolts, nuts, washers, pipe fittings, tubing, hose, leftover project metal stock, leftover project starboard stock, and pieces of plexi and honestly, just plain junk, until I need it.
However, when I do need 6 screws, nuts, bolts washers, hose clamps or whatever, I will purchase 10 to keep those supplies stocked.
I guess that's the key though; it's mostly just junk, until you need it, and if you aren't near a store, it's twice as valuable junk.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Brent Swain

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,112 Posts
I am getting so much old line onboard I have to do something drastic. The tipping point was being tied up in Cape Town for a winter in an area famous (infamous) for the 50 knot winds that are pretty common. We had a boat keeper who kept an eye on things and added extra lines as necessary. When we returned to Africa we had 13 (13!) lines holding the boat and most of them had suffered at least some chafe. I think we managed to throw out three that were beyond salvation but a little nip and cut and I keep all of them along with other dock lines I already had. I think when we get back to North AmericaI will get nasty and throw out a lot of old stuff - at least I think I will.
Short pieces of chain, shackled into hard eyes on your mooring lines, with chain only passing over chafe points, eliminates chafe. Solid pad eyes on the outside of your bow and quarters, to shackle hard eyes into, on the ends of your mooring lines, eliminates chafe on the boat end of mooring lines.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,112 Posts
I remember a couple I met in New Zealand on their third circumnavigation. They said "People look down their noses at our junky old boat. But when they need something, who do they go to? The fancy marina queen? No way, they make a beeline to the junky old boat, because they know you have everything, and the fancy marina queen has little !"
Storing extra stuff at home only lightens a boat, as long as home is not your boat.
When you cruise off the beaten path, all you have is what you bring with you. What you didn't bring, you cant get, and have to improvise, something the marina queen crowd can't possibly get their heads around . They have no such experience .
Try find a stainless bolt , piece of rigging wire or stainless anything, or dacron or nylon line on Fanning Island. No such animal there. I couldn't find a suitable piece of wood to make a local a spear gun. The make their spears out of spiral 1/4 inch steel rod windings off the submarine cable, hammered as straight as they can get them ( which is not very straight) They have no alternatives.
 

·
Over Hill Sailing Club
Joined
·
3,688 Posts
Count me among the incorrigible packrats. NEVER throw anything out! You never know when you might need it.:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,961 Posts
This has nothing to do with sailing, but everything to do with why I'm a packrat.

One sunny Sunday when I was just out of college I was driving around some gravel North Dakota roads when a horrible rattling came from beneath my Dodge Colt. The exhaust pipe had rusted through at one spot and was nearly off. I managed to get it the rest of the way off and threw it in the hatchback. When I got back to my apartment instead of throwing it in the dumpster like any sensible person, I took it up to my apartment with me and stashed it behind my bedroom door.

A couple hours later a friend came by and said "Can you believe it? I just need like two feet of exhaust pipe to fix my car, and I spent all afternoon driving to around to the service stations in the area to see they had any they'd give me, but no luck at all."

I was able to reach behind the door and say "I might have just the thing you need..."

Now I can never throw anything away, *because* *you* *just* *never* *know!*
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top