SailNet Community banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
673 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So most of the boats I've raced offshore on have had a way of downloading GRIBs. Usually a very expensive setup too.
I'm looking for the most economical way of setting up my boat to download GRIB's at sea (IE NO WiFi/cell service) and it only has to be a one trip deal.

So, do I invest in a SSB and connect to my laptop? Or is there an easy way to rent a Sat Phone and connect to a laptop?
I suspect there is, I just don't know the technical details.
Or better yet, is it possible to just use a SSB Receiver and connect that to a laptop to download the NOAA broadcasts?
What say y'all?
 

·
Mermaid Hunter
Joined
·
5,689 Posts
Weather information is very important. Gribs are not the best source of weather information.

You can use an inexpensive SSB receiver like the Kaito 1103 (lots of options) and a decent antenna, free software like JVCOMM32, a $5 cable from Radio Shack, and a laptop to get synoptic charts. Google rfax.pdf for the schedules worldwide. Easy peasy and way better than gribs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,475 Posts
I still find it remarkable there isn't yet and "app for that". May require an adapter that allows connectivity to a pactor modem or sat phone, but still. Offshore Wx remain in the stone ages.

I understand the offshore market is relatively small, but I would bet there are many coastal cruisers that would acquire the tech for that trip where cell coverage is tough or doesn't work. Not to mention, how many of us are equip so "we could go anytime" even when we don't often. Just makes us feel good that we could. :)
 

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
Weather information is very important. Gribs are not the best source of weather information.

You can use an inexpensive SSB receiver like the Kaito 1103 (lots of options) and a decent antenna, free software like JVCOMM32, a $5 cable from Radio Shack, and a laptop to get synoptic charts. Google rfax.pdf for the schedules worldwide. Easy peasy and way better than gribs.
auspicious I googled this and the first page is nws from noaa...is that the one I should use?

2012 version?

thanks

I remembered a thread on here talking about the cheapest receiver only weatherfax system and yours is practically that...maybe it was you who posted it...:)
 

·
Mermaid Hunter
Joined
·
5,689 Posts
auspicious I googled this and the first page is nws from noaa...is that the one I should use?
That is it. Feb 2012 is the latest version - these things don't change often.

Very important to read and understand the third paragraph under "About this Publication" that describes tuning frequencies.

Weather fax uses frequency shift keying (FSK). FSK uses a baseband signal (the synoptic chart) to shift the transmission frequency either between two states (black and white) or over a range of frequencies (gray-scale). Most of us use upper single-sideband (USB) to receive weather fax signals. Given standards for filter bandwidth and offset that means to receive a signal transmitted using FSK, conventionally listed by center frequency, with a radio using single side-band, conventionally listed by the (suppressed) carrier frequency you have to subtract 1900 kHz (1.9 MHz) from the frequency listed in rfax.pdf to obtain the dial frequency for your radio.

Tools like Airmail and JVCOMM32 will do the arithmetic for you.
 

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
thanks bud!
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top