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Owner 1973 C-41 Sloop
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So my Wife and I have started to seriously discuss living aboard and sailing the world. But where to start? Project boat? Fully equipped spend your life savings boat? There are so many things to consider. I look at ads to buy boats everyday, anyone have any thoughts on this?
So my Wife and I have started to seriously discuss living aboard and sailing the world. But where to start? Project boat? Fully equipped spend your life savings boat? There are so many things to consider. I look at ads to buy boats everyday, anyone have any thoughts on this?
It all depends on what you want to do with your boat once you own it. I was forced to move aboard a 27-footer (1977 Columbia 8.3) after being evicted. Every rainy day I noticed drips inside. After about 8 months of being aboard all day, every day, they ALL were cured. (BTW, NEVER stop a leak by patching from the inside, find the SOURCE and patch it from the OUTSIDE).
I spent a few months studying the Atomic-4 30hp gasoline engine after I had a problem with the fuel filter. I knew enough about it that I could be an authorized mechanic. I then rewired the 12v system, using the correct guage of wire recommended by Nigel Calder in his book The Boatowner's Mechanical and Electrical Handbook. I also tinned the ends of the wires (not called for in that book, and likely unnecessary) and burned shrink-wrap over the crimp connections.
For me, it was just a place to stay while I worked. I worked at a restaurant a block away. But staying there every day made me see problems, and fix them.

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I would look for a boat that has SOME level of defect, something specific that you can fix yourself. Finish (varnish, paint) is a nag point. Electronics, electrical, rotten wood, bad halyards or sails, are very strong negotiating points. Also voids in fiberglass sections! Fiberglass voids are VERY SERIOUS as the repair means rearing up one layer of fiberglass and replacing the wood under it, then laying new fiberglass over that wood. DO NOT buy one of these unless it is very cheap (like $3k for a 30-footer--but you have to be willing to do the work or hire it done)!

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I do not know what your skill level is, but I have a boat for sale. It is a Columbia 41 Center cockpit. LOTS of room. SUPER dry (RE:Sailing) 6-foot freeboard, 18" coamings, no wave will wet this cockpit! If you plan to cross the Southern Horn, this boat is for you! She even has a SEA HOOD!
ALL NEW CANVAS Sunbrella 3-pc w/ sail window w/cover! Whole galley wood rotted out. I replaced it ALL w/ 3/4" Marine Plywood. All cabinets rotted, REPLACED w/ wood coated in WestMarine501Epoxy. The LOA is 41'2" and the beam is 9'8" (which is why I want a Morgan 38 O/I) it's a narrow boat. It sails faster (Alan Payne design) given the smaller breadth, but for living board (making a home) I would prefer a Morgan 41 (note that marinas charge per foot and 41' is a delimiter), (that's why I want a 38/OI). PICS at Ray I
 

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So my Wife and I have started to seriously discuss living aboard and sailing the world. But where to start? Project boat? Fully equipped spend your life savings boat? There are so many things to consider. I look at ads to buy boats everyday, anyone have any thoughts on this?
One piece of advice, whatever other things you consider during the boat acquisition process: don’t take the shore on board with you. Life on a boat is it’s own thing. Many people would say it’s a bit closer to camping than normal life on land. If you try to live life on board the exact same way you live in land, it’s going to cost you a fortune, you’ll find you still can’t totally live life on board the same way as life on land and, the attempt to do so will ruin your experience.

Read: get real get gone, how to become a modern sea gypsie and sail

it is full of useable information and ideas and it will help get you headed in the right direction.
 
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