SailNet Community banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
584 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Just got a GREAT shape Ullman Carbon 140% Genoa that fits my boat perfectly. The question is (and it may be a dumb question) how tight should I tighten the jib halyard. Being a laminate sail should I be more concerned about the tension on it? With the Dacron sails I have had on the boat, I tightened then used the winch on the deck to give it a few more clicks and then tied it down. I did the same with this sail but I was wondering, is that a good idea? thoughts.....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
375 Posts
The right tension depends on a lot of things - there's really no way to say without trying it out. I'd make it fairly tight, then go out & sail and see how it looks. Big wrinkles parallel to the luff would indicate too tight.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,715 Posts
Hanked, or on a furler or foil? I find I need much less halyard tension with my current boat with a furler than I did with my previous boat with hanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,479 Posts
Halyard tension should be adjusted the same as any other sail. Tension should be less in light air to give the sail a fuller, more powerful shape, and more taut in stronger winds. There's no benefit to over-tensioning a sail. It won't point higher or foot faster.
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
9,064 Posts
There are two ways that you can over tighten a jib halyard. The first is that it is too tight to have a proper flying shape. In light winds the halyard wants to be tight enough that the jib does not sag on the stay. That is usually only hand tight.

At the upper end of the wind range, you will want a lot of halyard tension.Carbon sails stretch very little. In fact it takes a little while to get used to them.

By way of example, with my carbon-dyneema jib on my 38 footer there is less than 6 inches in the position of the mark on the halyard between way too loose for light winds, and as tight as I need to get the halyard for heavy winds. (That is with a low stretch halyard.) My prior Kevlar sails stretched roughly 50% more than that and my Dacron delivery Genoa stretched roughly 14" to 16" and had a much narrower wind range being too heavy for really light winds and too stretchy for the upper end of moderate winds. (I e. My carbon sail wind range is from 3- 4 knots to 25 knots, while the Dacron sail is 4 knots to around 12 knots.)

In some ways carbon sails are very tough, meaning that they are typically much lighter and can stand up to much more wind than Dacron sails. But you can over load them and damage them by excessively tightening the halyard.

Jeff
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,798 Posts
Thanks guys!!! great info!! I think I have too much tension on it...I'll ease it back.
Jeff gave a great summary. My view is that laminate sails will perform very well with moderate tension, so there is no reason to grunt on them, the way we sometimes do with aging polyester sails. Additionally, the furler bearings won't like it, and who remembers to release tension before furling?

Just get the wrinkles out and call it good.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,414 Posts
In my experience laminate sails don't need nearly as much halyard tension as dacron sails, however small adjustments can affect draft position.

Treat that laminate sail gently, and try to avoid storing it on the furler. If you must, at least slack the halyard tension off when not in use.

Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,870 Posts
Laminate sails do not need as much tension and do not stretch, truth be told they shrink over time. ask any sailmaker what is the bestway to store a laminate sail and they will say to roll it, not flake it. so leaving it rolled on the furler is really easier on the sail then flaking. last boat we flaked all the laminate sails and we had delam after a while from flaking, on the new boat we keep the jib on the furler and not a problem any where on the sail after 4 years. we use a zipper sleeve cover. If the sail can't stretch and the halyard tension required is low then there is no reason to slack the halyard when not in use. laminate sails require you to relearn everything you knew about sails.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,414 Posts
Laminate sails do not need as much tension and do not stretch, truth be told they shrink over time. ask any sailmaker what is the bestway to store a laminate sail and they will say to roll it, not flake it. so leaving it rolled on the furler is really easier on the sail then flaking. last boat we flaked all the laminate sails and we had delam after a while from flaking, on the new boat we keep the jib on the furler and not a problem any where on the sail after 4 years. we use a zipper sleeve cover. If the sail can't stretch and the halyard tension required is low then there is no reason to slack the halyard when not in use. laminate sails require you to relearn everything you knew about sails.
There is a big difference between rolling a laminate sail the way the sailmaker envisions it, and wrapping it tightly around the forestay the way a furler does.

I race on a boat owned by a sailmaker. We roll the mainsail before stowing it below, and we flake and brick his headsails.

I doubt you will find many sailmakers that advocate storing a laminate sail on a furler vs removing it and bagging it when not in use.

Sent from my SM-G960W using Tapatalk
 

·
ASA and PSIA Instructor
Joined
·
4,096 Posts
You really should release the halyard tension AFTER fueling the sail...releasing before creates the risk of wrapping the halyard while furling.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top