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Hi Troy
We own a Duncanson 35 and like her a lot. We sail on Moreton Bay and fix her in Manly. She is extremely well balanced and very safe and predictable and considering her age and conservative hull shape... well, she is not slow.

The heads are small, but on the upside the forepeak has decent length. The quarter berths are tight, the cockpit is small, there are no cockpit lockers and working on the engine requires flexibility. But, she is a classic sail boat with magnificent lines and the most beautiful movement. She is not a high volume yacht and a bit more modest in room below deck than modern vessels.

If you are seriously considering buying a 35 I would be happy to give you some pointers, what to look out for, based on what we learnt after we bought ours. It might help you negotiate a better price.
 

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Duncanson 37

Hi Cy
I can only tell you of my one experience with our 35 footer, but I imagine it will translate to the Duncanson 37. I have also been frustrated with the lack of information on the Duncanson as there are a few of them out there. It is my understanding that some of the Duncansons were finished off in various yards. Therefore there is some variation between the coachhouses and how some of the technical issues weres solved. This includes whether the mast was stepped on keel or deck and whether the prop drive was centred in front of the rudder or actually exited next to and behind the rudder.

Our boat, supposedly built in 1973 had a teak deck overlay that was worn away and small screws through the teak penetrated the fibreglass deck and were leaking. Further, all the mastic around/under every fitting was gone. The only way to fix this properly is to remove everything on deck including the toe rail which is fixed onto the teak decking and is a structural member of the hull- deck joint. This is a fairly serious bit of work.

So have a good look at the deck and if it has been fibreglassed over already, how was it done. Was the toe rail removed or was the teak cut off flush with the rail?

From slow gradual leaking through the deck, we had extensive delamination to the plywood bulkheads and have re-glassed them all. The damage was restricted to the areas directly under the deck. The lower half of the boat was strong and solid, typical of the time.

The chain plates are glassed onto the inside of the hull and they are glassed so that the fibreglass droops down and allows any water to run through. This can look a bit strange when first encountered but makes perfectly good sense.

The hulls of the duncansons are extremely well finished, that is the outside only. On the inside the coarse glass roving were just left unfinished without any surfacing tissue. However, the effort the builders saved on the inside they put on the outside (where it counts). The hull is perfectly shaped with not even the slightest bump or abnormality. To the eye, the hull looks perfectly true.

Obviously I think they are great boats and I rather fix a beautiful classic like a Duncanson then something with less integrity.
qflez
 
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