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Hi guys, I am new to this forum, although knew about this forum from previous research into boats. Basically, I have been looking into and learning all I can for the past 1-2 years.

I am thinking about checking out a Duncanson 35 that is for sale locally here in Hobart. The boat is a '76 model, and according to the advert was sailed over from SA some years ago. Basically, having looked at the boat in the marina, but not yet inside, it seems to be in reasonable condition, though some basic TLC wouldn't go astray, polishing the hull, cleaning the deck, and re-varnishing the wood fittings etc. According to the advert, however, it has been well maintained and upgraded but of course in truth this really needs to be established. The price is reduced down to $45K, but as it has been for sale for a while now and the owners have upgraded to a newer bigger boat, I would imagine there is likely some further room for negotiation.

As someone relatively new to sailing, and it would be my first boat, I wish to be a little cautious before proceeding to making an offer/and a marine survey. Learning about any issues with boats I am interested in be it a Dunc or something similar seems wise to me. I do mostly like the look of the Dunc, especially the hull shape which appeals, but on the other hand the interior does tend to look a little dated, the open head into the V berth is not so great, and the quarter berths do seem awkward, let alone exactly where the chart table, coms, electrics etc are located. On the positive it does have a 3 burner stove and proper fridge (rather than an ice box), new upholstery, has been re-wired and has reasonable coms/instrumentation etc. Supposedly the sail wardrobe is in overall good condition.

In looking through the specs for this boat overall it seems pretty reasonable, aside the anchor which is an older design and is certainly something I would want to replace with a better holding type pretty much ASAP. I do like the idea that all the sheets etc lead back to the cockpit and that the dodger and bimini would offer reasonable protection from the elements.

I think next off will be an internal inspection and yes checking out the bilge will be a part of this process. The hull, skeg, prop arrangement, and rigging, engine/transmission etc would be a part of the survey inspection of course.

The main issue down here in Tassie is the lack of suitable 34-36 ft sloops for sale, and/or especially within my budget. Hence, even if this boat is not exactly what I am looking for, if it meets most requirements, then perhaps it could be a reasonable first boat.
 

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Thanks for the positive feedback on the Duncs. As I mentioned locally there is an older ('76) but tidy 35 for sale here, now reduced to $42K ono, but as well I have seen on Yachthub a Dunc 34 for around $35K ono. It looks tidy, though I don't know which build year or any of its specifications. The question however, to consider is which actually might make a better cruising boat. I have read quite a bit about each model. I am sure both would be fine for shorthanded sailing, for coastal cruising as well as some longer passages eg across Bass Straight etc. The entry price of the 34, being some $7K cheaper makes it interesting albeit one would need to get it down from its current location in Cairns. (quite a long sail back to Hobart !).

But then again there are some other alternatives to consider in a similar vein including a 1980 Sparkman and Stephens 34 for $29K (reduced from its original asking price of $60K) and a Carter 33 also for $29K. Both of these boats being in Sydney. In truth there are probably a number of other similar types of boats within this price range also out there for sale.

So what to do. The one thing I do know is that while the 'plastic' modern boats look lovely inside and have more spacious cockpits etc. In truth I can't afford a $70K plus boat, nor at this point in time in view of my limited sailing experience do I want one, and from what I have read and been told by others there are some concerns over the longevity and sailing characteristics of such lighter types of boats.

If I am to buy a boat, I simply wish to get the best one I can for the limited funds I have and to enjoy learning to sail with it. Until I get my own boat, therefore I will continue to sail on other people's boats, learn and ask questions.
 
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