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1979 C&C 30 Mk I - 2QM15
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Discussion Starter #1
Does the name you choose to register your boat under have to be unique for your county or state? Or can two boats have the same name?

If the former, where do you search for names that are already in use? (I'm in Annapolis Maryland).
 

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backcreeksailor said:
Does the name you choose to register your boat under have to be unique for your county or state? Or can two boats have the same name?
Must be OK, cuz there's about 10 zillion 'Obsessions' up here in my neck of the pond.
 

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Does the name you choose to register your boat under have to be unique for your county or state? Or can two boats have the same name?

If the former, where do you search for names that are already in use? (I'm in Annapolis Maryland).
For USCG Documentation, many boats can certainly have the same name. I think there are 3 or 4 with the name of our boat and I named 2 of them. There are bunches of boats registered with popular names like "Osprey" and silly ones like "Sales(Sails) Call".

I don't think States care whether the boat is named or not, they give you a number.
 

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In Canada if you want to register your boat, the name must be unique - but that is usually dealt with be appending a "II" or "III" etc behind the name.. not necessarily an ideal solution. This is only to be listed in the Canadian Shipping Registry, which is not a requirement unless you're above a certain size (65 feet IIRC). Your Registration No. must be permanently affixed to a part of the vessel below decks.

To simply license in Canada there's no restriction on the name, but then you must display a license number on the boat. Licensing is free, there is a nominal fee for Registration, which I believe includes the name search.
 

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In the US, a lot of the less original or tackier names are repeated quite often. Sea Mist is a good example... Ecstasy in its various spellings is pretty rampant...
 

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With respect to USCG Documented vessels, boats with the same name are ok. Usually the hailing port is different. In my case I have seen one other Namaste but are hailing ports were not the same. Mine is Long Beach, Ca. What will really seperate boats with the same name and hailing ports is the vessel documentation id, which must be mounted permantly somewhere on the vessel. Mine is located below deck mounted on a bulk head. I don't think the states (at least Ca.) care. California requires a registration id mounted on the port/starboard side of the bow.
 

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1979 C&C 30 Mk I - 2QM15
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Discussion Starter #9

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USCG documentation is a completely different process than state registration. State registration is usually no different than registering a car; its a way for the state to keep track of your vessel and collect revenue. USCG registration for recreational vessels is purely optional.
 

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1979 C&C 30 Mk I - 2QM15
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Discussion Starter #11
USCG documentation is a completely different process than state registration. State registration is usually no different than registering a car; its a way for the state to keep track of your vessel and collect revenue. USCG registration for recreational vessels is purely optional.
Ok... So then what are the advantages and/or disadvantages of registering your boat with USCG?
 

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From the USCG website:

The difference between Documentation and State registration is that Documentation is a form of Federal Registration for larger boats (5 net tons or more). It has two basic advantages:
  • Documentation makes it easier to get bank financing. A bank will often stipulate that boat must be documented.
  • Documentation makes it easier to establish the identity of the vessel when cruising foreign waters (the Coast Guard Documentation serves as a "passport" for the vessel).
Recreational boats of 5 net tons or more (approximately 35 feet in length and over) are eligible (but not required) to be documented by the Coast Guard. Documenting a boat is generally more expensive than registering it with the State, but it may have advantages if the boat is used for international travel. Some States will require registration of a boat even if it is documented.
If a pleasure craft owner wishes to have a vessel documented as a yacht, it can be done if:
  1. The vessel is 5 net tons or more.
  2. The owner is a citizen of the United States.
  3. The vessel is used exclusively for pleasure.
  4. The owner can establish the necessary facts of construction and ownership.
This will document the yacht as a vessel of the United States, but it will not exempt it from any applicable State or Federal taxes. Furthermore, the fact that the yacht is documented will not excuse the owner from complying with safety and equipment regulations of the Federal or State governments in the State in which the vessel is used.


Vessels may be documented in three categories: pleasure, commercial, or commercial with a pleasure endorsement.
Ok... So then what are the advantages and/or disadvantages of registering your boat with USCG?
 

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1979 C&C 30 Mk I - 2QM15
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Discussion Starter #14
By those standards, my 30' boat wouldn't even be eligible for USCG registration. So although this is great information, it's kind of a moot point for my particular vessel. Correct?
 

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By those standards, my 30' boat wouldn't even be eligible for USCG registration. So although this is great information, it's kind of a moot point for my particular vessel. Correct?
Nope, my boat is 30ft and it is a documented vessel. When I bought my boat it was state registered. I documented it because of trips down to Mexico. The Mexican government does not recognize a Calif. regestered vessel and sometimes there are problems. At least that was how it was explained to me.
 

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I've seen boats that were USCG documented as small as 26' LOA. If my 28' trimaran, which certainly displaces less than a 30' LOA monohull can be USCG documented, I don't see why yours couldn't be. BTW, the NET DISPLACEMENT the USCG uses has very little to do with the actual displacement of the vessel. I doubt my boat weighs more than 5000 lbs. with everything and crew, yet the USCG says it displaces a NET 7 TONS.

By those standards, my 30' boat wouldn't even be eligible for USCG registration. So although this is great information, it's kind of a moot point for my particular vessel. Correct?
 

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yep- we just renewed it and updated the owner info when we bought the boat from the other owner-
FYI in times of war coast guard documented boats can be commandeered by the gov.
 

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The USCG documentation stays with the boat... the documentation number shouldn't change for the life of the boat... when you buy a USCG documented boat, the documentation gets changed.

While we're on the topic...
Is the USCG documentation transferable from one owner to another?
 
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