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I am trying to refinish an older Edson cockpit table. Once i began sanding, it became apparent that the surface teak was only a vaneer and not a solid board. The description of the table on the Edson site indicates solid teak construction. Does anyone know if they have changed the method of construction from a vaneer to solid teak? I could probably apply another vaneer on top of the current surface but does anyone have other suggestions about refinishing the table? Looking at the price for replacement (over $1000) are there any less expensive replacements available?
 

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Learning the HARD way...
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Starboard! (UHWPE that is)
 

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We built this in 1/2" Starboard for about $150 incl hardware.. next time I'll use heavier (5/8 or 3/4)





 
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Teak is beautiful for a cockpit table. You are correct, the Edson is a veneer, they haven't gone solid, despite the high cost! Do a search, there are less expensive tables out there. Maybe there's something on e-Bay?


Mandolin, Bayfield 36 out of Rock Creek, Chesapeake Bay.

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Edson is very high quality but very expensive. On the other hand, if you need a part and it's below a minimum amount for ordering they will send it to you for free.


Mandolin, Bayfield 36 out of Rock Creek, Chesapeake Bay.

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One of my winter projects was to refinish my cockpit table. It's solid teak and mounted to an Edson wheel unit, but not positive its made by Edson. Did come as standard on the Boat (Cal 33) in 1985.
 

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Can you not save the veneer?
- Chemical stripping to remove the varnish
- Scraper (flat metal blade) to get it smooth/even. Wire wool is also good, with a suitable solvent.
- Bleach/repair dings/stain
- Refinish

I used to restore/refinish antique furniture (not professionally, though), and it is rare that the original wood veneer could not be saved or repaired. Unless you have sanded it through :-O

(and yes, antiques often use veneers, for inlays, decorative effects, saving money, etc. Veneers were first developed around 3000 BC.)
 

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Ron, what did you use to keep that extended? Is there a leg that comes out? I need a cockpit table and have a piece of starboard sitting around...that looks like a great project!
Jim.. it's a collapsing strut by Rakego Roca Marine | Value on Board



Aluminum, it's standing up well and operates easily. Even at that flat angle it's plenty strong.
 
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Those "holes" are screws for the rails on the flip side.


Mandolin, Bayfield 36 out of Rock Creek, Chesapeake Bay.

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If you've sanded through veneer it's probably not an Edson table.

That said if you have, you have all the hardware so why not use the existing plywood table as a template for a new solid wood table.

It doesn't have to be teak. You could use mahogany, ipe or any number of less expensive woods that do well outdoors.
 

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Another vote for a great table Faster!

How did you finish it, and what are the holes in the second pic?
Thanks.. The beauty of using this material is that there's no finishing beyond the rounding-over edges with a router and 'easing' the sharp corners/edges from the saw. Next time I'll cut it all out with a template and a router - much cleaner edges.

Those "holes" are screws for the rails on the flip side.
Correct.. with the 1/2" material I had to add those stiffeners underneath. When we use the opened table we put a cut-to-fit nonskid mat on top, you don't see the screws. I think Edson welds the pieces together.
 

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My table is Edson, it's solid.

If I had to build one I'd go to an exotic wood supplier and buy the wood and make it myself.

I picked up a 6 foot by 9 inch by 2 inch thick piece of teak to make a fireplace mantle from these guys for 70 bucks a couple years ago.
Their prices have gone up since then, but where is that not true.
Welcome to Exotic Lumber Inc
 
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