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Discussion Starter #181
Good deal Cap'n, I'm jealous of your free time (I've been working 14 hour days for the past 2 months with only one Sunday off in that whole time....) and your progress! Did you get the display? Are you able to measure your unloaded RPM at a given voltage? Would be good to share for the record, I'm sure a lot of people would be interested in it. That's the Motenergy ME1115 right?

Sean
Careful working that hard. It's easy to burn out if you don't take time for yourself.

I didn't get the display. I'm planning to, but I want to get the basic kit installed before I figure out where to put that. I might spring for the battery power gauge as well, if I can find the helm real estate for it. I'm probably going to have to redesign the helm station anyway, since I don't really have anywhere to install the key switch. Maybe I'll take out one of my old ray marine displays.

I plan to share all the data as I accumulate it. I'll eventually post a comparison between the old Yarnmar 2gm20 and the new Motenergy ME1115.

I'm a bit disappointed in how slow the progress has been so far. Unfortunately, I'm quite tall, so I can only work in extremely cramped spaces like boat engine compartments for so long. Being bent over double for hours takes a toll the next day or two.

I hope to finish the physical install soon. Khaleesea also needs her bottom paint redone, so I'll have to have a go at that too.
 

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Looking forward to it, you're doing great.

RE: bent over double, try doing it without a cabin sole... on an encapsulated keel boat...owwwww

RE: working too hard, yes.

Sean
 

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Discussion Starter #184
I'm going with Chevy Volt batteries. They have a number of advantages that makes them well suited to what I'm doing. The form factor works well for me, they use pouch cells, they have built in temperature sensors, and they're over-engineered for what I'm trying to do. The max power I can draw through the motor controller is about 0.8C, and I'll be well below that for cruising speed.

They'll be living in an ABYC compliant battery box, wired in parallel, an using a dilithium BMS. I'll be exporting the BMS data to a wifi-enabled Photon so I can monitor it remotely. I'm using a relatively low-powered charger, at least at first, and will be monitoring the charge cycles like a hawk until I'm confident they can charge unattended. There are multiple points at which the charging circuit can fail-open: The BMS, the Charger and the Photon will all have the ability to cut the power should anything go amiss.

On the controller side, it monitors engine temp, controller temp, voltage, etc.

I'll be taking things slowly at first. I'll probably start by running the motor in the slip for a full discharge and do a full charge cycle while I'm on the boat so I can keep an eye on things like cell temp. The BMS has automatic individual cell control, so I can get a history of each cell as it charges.

I'm a long way from testing, though. I have to finish the physical install, which looks like it's going to take some aft bulkhead redesign. The space for the battery box exists, but the openings aren't large enough to maneuver the box into it. I'll probably have to go in from below by removing everything not fiberglassed in place and then rebuilding it all afterwards. We shall see.
 

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Discussion Starter #185
Update, 3/25/2019

The motor, controller, transmission, throttle, wiring, contractor, and coupler are all completed. All the cables are tied down.

I ran into quite a few roadblocks this weekend, but I was able to overcome them all. I had to build a platform for the controller to sit on, embiggen some holes so I could run the cables up to the helm, make said cables 10' longer by splicing in more cable, and install the motor.

But the worst, by far, was fitting the throttle into the helm. It's not a lot bigger than the space it fits in, and I had to find swing room for the actuator couplers. Then there was tightening everything up so it operated correctly. The nut for the arm was backwards, so I had to really finagle it to get the hex wrench on it. (see pictures) I had to build a little platform for it to sit on out of marine grade ply, then put the actuator on the arm, then put the bracket on the platform, then slide the platform under the actuator and finally screw that into place. But at least the throttle lever is exactly where it should be.

Coming up, I'm rebuilding the helm, taking one of the raymarine units out (redundant with the forward ones) and putting the key and a displayport in it's place.

Then, finally, I'll tackle battery placement. I took a good look at that this weekend, and I don't think there's any way to make the batteries fit where I initially wanted them to go, at least not in the battery box. I could fit them in without it, but I want the extra layer of protection. So it looks like I'll have to yank the diesel tank and put the battery box there, instead

I think if I was a foot shorter or much more flexible things would have gone a lot more smoothly. :p
 

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Discussion Starter #186
Update 4/1/2019

I adjusted the prop distance from the cutlass bearing to the recommended 3/8".

I've removed some of the bulkhead panels to see if I can remove the diesel tank with a minimum of fuss. The builders glassed over some of the screws. Thanks for that, Hunter.

I had a very interesting conversation with an ABYC master tech about lithium battery safety. Looks like I'll have to change my plans and construct a waterproof battery box with a sealed and coiled vent. That's going to be an interesting build, seeing as I know nothing about how to work with fiberglass. To be clear, this isn't a requirement for sailboats (they generally don't flip over like fat bottomed power boats do), but it's not a bad idea.

It finally warmed up enough to start removing all the barnacle damage on the hull. I rented the marina's sander and vacuum. Big mistake. They gave me a heavy industrial unit without grips. My arms were rubber when I was about half done, and I had help. I've since bought my own sander that's both more powerful and lighter, and has three different grips. I'll get back at it as soon as the weather warms back up. The actual painting won't take long.

Funny thing, looks like the boat has never been fully sanded down. I found at least 3 different colors of paint, including a brown layer that might have been copper. As in my work life, legacy is a *****. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #187
Update 4/8/2019

The diesel tank isn't going to go without a fight. I was able to remove the bulkhead next to it and get that bracket unscrewed, but the bracket on the other side is proving problematic. I might have to cut the screws off to remove it. I still have some cooling hoses to remove and a bunch of general cleanup to do. I'm going to have the boat inspected by an ABYC tech before I finalize the installation to make sure I didn't miss anything.

I built a frame out of scrap the same size as the battery box I designed. No go. There's too many protrusions in the way for it to fit. Looks like the battery box will have to be a double-decker to fit.

The sanding continues. I'm sanding off a couple of decade's worth of paint. In some places it's at least 1/8" thick in at least 4 layers. In others, it's almost non-existent. I switched disks to Diablo brand and the sanding suddenly was moving much faster. I'm hoping to have the sanding and painting done by the end of the week.

April is rapidly filling up with goings-on, both at work and home. The Annapolis boat show is the last weekend of April, as is Avengers:Endgame, so I doubt I'll be getting much done that weekend. :)
 

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Keep it coming CC, I don't say much but am reading your reports.
 

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Discussion Starter #189
Keep it coming CC, I don't say much but am reading your reports.
Thanks David, I appreciate the encouragement.

I'm having the blocks moved so I can finish the sanding today. Hopefully that will mean painting will be done this weekend, and that will leave just the system test before I drop her back in the water.

I had an ABYC tech look over my setup so far. He found a couple things that I wouldn't have even known to look for. Nothing I did was flat out wrong, but a couple of things could use improvement. All the major stuff, like where everything is positioned, was fine. I'm going to hire him to help me make some changes that I am uncomfortable doing by myself, like pulling out the diesel tank and repositioning the waste tank to make room for the battery box. Since that will now be located behind a bulkhead, I'll have to relocate the breaker somewhere more convenient.

So a little more design work to do, then I can finish the install.
 

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Discussion Starter #190
Thank the deity of your choice that I was able to finish the sanding yesterday.

Of course, now the weather has turned and there won't be a not-raining window between now and Monday, so painting will have to wait.

Hopefully I'll be able to get the battery box built this weekend. I'll take final measurements today. Looks like a 20"x24"x12" box will do the trick. I've never done fiberglass anything before, so with any luck I won't **** it up too badly. Getting it into place and screwed down might be another question entirely...

Sailing. It's not just a crapton of work, it's an adventure!
 

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Canuck-
" I just need a semi-clever way to connect the engine mains to the bus bar for the pack."
Easy. Get to a city where they have theatrical performances, or outdoor "sound and light" shows, and find a theatrical lighting supply house. Theatrical lighting uses heavy plugs, a hundred amps at 220 volts is a rounding error for them. Any professional electrical supply house should be able to turn up the same type of plugs. Some are twist-lock, some simply plug together, your choice. Won't be cheap--but they are doing the job every day.

Boatsurgeon-
I don't argue that the ABYC standards are often a good guide. But. If anyone is interested in boating safety, or electrical safety, ABYC is a poor excuse. They are a trade group, not regulators, and their standards are only OPTIONALLY accepted and required by various trade group members, boat builders, and insurers, correct?
I'd call that a trade guild, and their real purpose is...to fund themselves.

I know it costs money to develop and publish standards, but since the average Joe has to ante up what, six hundred bucks? To get the ABYC standards? That ain't happening, and anyone who says "Oh, well, you just have to pay that much to learn how to do it safely" is preaching to an odd choir.

There has to be a reasonably priced (let's say, fifty bucks like any good hardcover these days, or better yet, free online like the IRS rules and so much else) set of standards to follow. And if I can't buy them for less, I'll expect my library to have a reference copy that I can use. So, nothing personal, but helix the ABYC, there are so many good books written by so many good authors. When the ABYC shows some interest in promoting boating safety rather than being a private club (just like Mar-y-Largo, sure, anyone can buy in) let us know.
Heck, even the US Army and Navy used to make all of their technical training manuals available cheap from the GPO and free online. And the USN knows how to make a point. They used to have some rather blunt photos online, in their DC power training, that showed a sailor's hand, with his ring finger traumatically amputated. Yeah, his wedding ring grounded a wrench that was on a battery terminal. He wasn't following USN standards. And they don't follow ABYC.(G)
 

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I've never done fiberglass anything before, so with any luck I won't **** it up too badly. Getting it into place and screwed down might be another question entirely...

Sailing. It's not just a crapton of work, it's an adventure!
You might want to browse the videos of http://boatworkstoday.com

He explains how to do fiberglass work very well. He makes it look easy and has a couple of videos that explain how to do a project that is close enough to what you need.

Also, have you thought of using some of the premade board to make boxes.
Cut the pieces and epoxy them together.

https://www.mcmaster.com/fiberglass
Structural FRP Fiberglass Sheets, Bars, and Strips

An alternative to wood in structural applications, these FRP fiberglass sheets, bars, and strips are strong and lightweight. They're made of fiberglass-reinforced polyester.

The even have chemical resistant options.

it is very expensive but so is everything.
 

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Discussion Starter #193
Canuck-
" I just need a semi-clever way to connect the engine mains to the bus bar for the pack."
Easy. Get to a city where they have theatrical performances, or outdoor "sound and light" shows, and find a theatrical lighting supply house. Theatrical lighting uses heavy plugs, a hundred amps at 220 volts is a rounding error for them. Any professional electrical supply house should be able to turn up the same type of plugs. Some are twist-lock, some simply plug together, your choice. Won't be cheap--but they are doing the job every day.
(G)
I've already solved this problem, but thanks for the input! Due to the design requirements of the battery box, I'm using stainless 5/16" through posts, marked red and black. The batteries will be wired in parallel to the posts, and the posts run directly to the controller via 00-105C rated cables. The box itself will be fiberglass and have a triple-spiral vent, but be otherwise waterproof and sealed.
 

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Discussion Starter #194
You might want to browse the videos of http://boatworkstoday.com

He explains how to do fiberglass work very well. He makes it look easy and has a couple of videos that explain how to do a project that is close enough to what you need.

Also, have you thought of using some of the premade board to make boxes.
Cut the pieces and epoxy them together.

https://www.mcmaster.com/fiberglass
Structural FRP Fiberglass Sheets, Bars, and Strips

An alternative to wood in structural applications, these FRP fiberglass sheets, bars, and strips are strong and lightweight. They're made of fiberglass-reinforced polyester.

The even have chemical resistant options.

it is very expensive but so is everything.
I'm using marine grade ply for the box. This was the most cost-effective option. The fiberglass materials came out to about $200 total, but I will have quite a bit left over for future work.

The videos were helpful. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #195
Update 4/15/2019

Bad weather prevented most of the work I wanted to do this weekend.

I did manage to replace the swimming ladder shoes and fix the prop end nut, and help a sailing buddy install his solar panels.

Unfortunately, I'm away for the next week, so I won't get much done until I get back. Hopefully the weather will hold and I'll be able to get one coat of bottom paint on before I leave.

Work is seriously interfering with my boat prep right now. :(
 

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Discussion Starter #196
Update 4/29/2019

Sickness and a busy weekend kept me from doing much since the last update.

The sanding is finished and the first coat of bottom paint is on. The battery box construction has started. I'll be fitting the box today. If it fits well, I'll start the glassing process this week.

I hope to get the new helm faceplate done and installed this week.

With any luck, I'lll have Khaleesea back in the water in a week or two to start trials with the new motor.
 

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Discussion Starter #197 (Edited)
Update 5/6/2019

Paint is finished.
Battery box is partially glassed.
Diesel tank is removed. I gave the diesel to a nice couple of guys who are from Peru, about to make the trek across the North Atlantic.

I have to move the waste tank over about 4" to fit the battery box without cutting the bulkhead. Its just strapped in, so this shouldn't be too much trouble.

Faceplate should be done this week.

Since I'm removing the majority of the AC wiring anyway, I'm converting the boat to a smartplug to replace the original twist-lock shore power connection.

Last piece of the BMS arrives on Wed, so I hope to have the battery box set up and installed this weekend. That's the last piece. Once that's in place Khaleesea will be ready to drop in the water for testing.
 

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Discussion Starter #200
Last remaining tasks:

Move waste tank to make room for battery box
Install battery box
Install new helm plate w/key
Remove old decal and install new one
Test, test, and retest, verify all systems work as designed
Replace all bulkheads
Clean everything
Launch!
In-water testing: speed, power, distance, regeneration, etc.
 
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