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Wauquiez Centurion 40
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Does anyone of you has an emergency stop facility in the cockpit to close the diesel supply to the engine? We need this in order to obtain the Swiss flag. So far I have never seen something like it on a boat....
 

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My current boat doesn't have a diesel inboard, but remote fuel shut offs are pretty common. They are a requirement on commercial vessels of any size in Canada, even water taxis have them.

Being able to shut off the fuel supply from the tank from the safety of the cockpit is not a bad idea.
 

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Master Mariner
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If we turn off the key the fuel solenoid cuts off the fuel to the engine. Some boats have a manual T handle and cable near the helm that stops the engine, but the electric fuel shut off should be sufficient.
 

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I thought this was how all diesels are stopped. We have a pull-stop in the cockpit. It's a standard cable connection to the fuel cutoff on the engine.
My old MD7a had the pull stop you describe, but my Yanmar 3jh4e has a fuel shut off solenoid, so you push a "stop" button to shut it down. There is apparently also an emergency stop button on the side of the engine. Other than that if I want to shut off fuel flow I have to close a valve at the fuel tank located under the aft berth.

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Old soul
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My old MD7a had the pull stop you describe, but my Yanmar 3jh4e has a fuel shut off solenoid, so you push a "stop" button to shut it down. There is apparently also an emergency stop button on the side of the engine. Other than that if I want to shut off fuel flow I have to close a valve at the fuel tank located under the aft berth.
I guess it amounts to the same thing. The solenoid must close the fuel valve on the injector pump, just like my pull cable. It's pretty easy on my Perkins 4108 to reach into the engine room and pull the fuel leaver on the pump if the cable ever came loose -- something that did happen to me once.
 

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Fire tends to play havoc with fuel lines and unless there's a shut off at the tanks a shut down engine is moot. Also consider avoiding pollution when you break up on the rocks When I put Thane thru CSI. for passenger carrying required was manual control from the centre cockpit..Extended the handle of the (not ball type) valves (think diy cv joints .Also had manual pulls for 2 halon tanks but they were choke type pull cables All this was part of annual inspection by Feds
 

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Our Beneteau came with the Yanmar engine cutoff solenoid and a cable operated shut off for the tank outlet as standard equipment
 

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Aloha 32 & Hunter 26.5
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Most sailboat diesel motors I have used, had a pull knob that was attached to a mechanical cable that moved an arm on the injector pump to shut the motor down. A few had stop buttons that operated a fuel solenoid. One boat had the stop button wired through the key switch. If you shut off the key switch first, the stop button would not shut down the engine. Some people prefer "normally open" solenoids that require power be sent to them to shut down the motor, so that in the event of a dead battery, the motor still continues to run. Some people prefer normally closed solenoids so that in the event of an electrical failure, the motor shuts down. My current boat has a 1/4 turn ball valve for emergency use & a pull knob for normal shut downs. The problem with the pull knob is that if you forget to push it back in, the moror will not start again next time, at least not until you figure out what you forgot to do.

Many options exist. I have no idea what the Swiss standards specify.
 

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I have a 3 way valve that I bought from ValveWorks in addition to the pull cable shutoff valve. I can shut off fuel supply or divert the fuel to a different fuel filter from the valve although it is not located in the cockpit. Mine is located just aft of the first racor fuel filter.
 

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Are we confusing engine stop with fuel isolation ?
Well the OP said "emergency stop". I take that to mean engine stop rather than tank isolation. I would guess most boats these days have basic ball valves for tank isolation.

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So ,,,you install the propane solenoid next to the stove for convenience and use the tank valve hidden in a stern locker in case of a leak or fire in the galley. Duh! Could it be that the authorities are considering remote shutdown/isolation of fuel tanks a good idea. Groping around in a burning engine room fed by a bilge full of fuel while a herd of panicking passengers wonder where you went and why you aren't handing out jackets and launching a raft . ??
 

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Well the OP said "emergency stop"
I‘m a little confused too. The OP said “emergency stop facility in the cockpit to close the diesel supply”.

If I had to retrofit, I’d consider an engine room fire extinguisher, that is wired into the engine, with a manual trigger in the cockpit. The good ones will also cut fuel and shut down the motor. However, I’m not as big a fan of those that do that all automatically, as I’ve known the brains to fail and strand the ship, as there is no fire, but it still interrupts the ignition.
 

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So ,,,you install the propane solenoid next to the stove for convenience and use the tank valve hidden in a stern locker in case of a leak or fire in the galley. Duh! Could it be that the authorities are considering remote shutdown/isolation of fuel tanks a good idea. Groping around in a burning engine room fed by a bilge full of fuel while a herd of panicking passengers wonder where you went and why you aren't handing out jackets and launching a raft . ??
I don't know how common diesel engine fires are on small sailboats, but I think if I was dealing with a fire I would be reaching for the fire extinguisher first and foremost. Once the engine is shut down the fuel is no longer flowing so not having the tank isolated isn't going to change the situation much if at all.

I think the most important reason to have a fuel cutoff on a diesel engine is to shut the engine down in the event of a runaway. In that case the fuel cutoff solenoid would shut the engine down quickly with the flick of a switch.

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my shutoff (Beta diesel) is an electrical solenoid so it needs power to operate it. I also installed a pull cable that enables me to shutdown the engine without power.
 

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Pretty sure they're talking about a fuel shutoff at the tank for in case of fire. All the commercial boats I've run had them, and we pulled them during our monthly drills. On one if the boats it was just a cable hooked to a ball valve at the tank. Cheap and simple, but no way to open the valve again without going down into the engine room. So on our drills we had to quickly finish the drill and send the deckhand down to open the valve before the engine starved out. One of the other boats it was a rigid rod the was led so you could close and reopen the valve from topside.

The shut down mechanism on the engine won't do any good if the fire has already melted the fuel hoses.
 

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Bluescruiser
Hinckley Bermuda 40
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Does anyone of you has an emergency stop facility in the cockpit to close the diesel supply to the engine? We need this in order to obtain the Swiss flag. So far I have never seen something like it on a boat....
yes- one simply pulls it to kill the engine. Every boat I’ve ever seen has one....but.. Swiss cruising?
 

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Pretty sure they're talking about a fuel shutoff at the tank for in case of fire. All the commercial boats I've run had them, and we pulled them during our monthly drills. On one if the boats it was just a cable hooked to a ball valve at the tank. Cheap and simple, but no way to open the valve again without going down into the engine room. So on our drills we had to quickly finish the drill and send the deckhand down to open the valve before the engine starved out. One of the other boats it was a rigid rod the was led so you could close and reopen the valve from topside.

The shut down mechanism on the engine won't do any good if the fire has already melted the fuel hoses.
That is my take on the question as well, as others have noted, all diesels have a means of stopping the fuel at the engine, I however have not seen a recreational boat fitted with a means of remotely isolating the fuel supply at the tank. Has anyone here seen this type of arrangement?
 
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