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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I am looking at buying an Endurance 35 built in Spain out of GRP and I was told by the surveyor that the ballast bolts were rusted. To be truthful, I never expected to find ballast bolts on a long keel GRP design as I assumed the ballast would be encapsulated in the keel such as on my Cape Dory.

Does the Endurance design use an external ballast? And if so, does anyone know how they are installed in the ballast (J-hooks or thru-bolts, etc..)? Also, any other information on the ballast bolts would be appreciated. I have looked but I cannot find any plans for the Endurance 35 online whichshow the ballast information (besides the weight of it).

Thanks!
David
 

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I had an Endurance 40 many years ago and as far as I know all sizes were long, one piece hulls, with encapsulated ballast.
The best Spanish built boats were from the boatyard at Calpi - can't remember the name.
Ask your surveyor if he's looking at the right boat - it wouldn't be the first time.....?
 

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It is presumably an external ie separate lead keel. All keel bolts require periodic removal and checking, so the replacement is not that major a deal.
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Thanks Jolly Roger for the response. I was actually curious about whether or not he talked about the right boat in that part of his report as I suspect some surveyors copy and paste statements from previous surveys to save time if the condition of that particular item is the same.

I did find on the web a blog of a build of an Endurance 44 and they stated they were going to use external ballast for rock resistance in groundings. But I cannot find any other information on any Endurance about the ballast. With as many as there are I would suspect I would have come across something if people had replaced or otherwise been concerned about ballast bolts.

I should say the survey I'm looking at was done by another surveyor a year ago on this boat, and not hired by me. So I wasn't able to talk directly to the surveyor.

Also, the Spanish yard which built this one is Belliure.

-David
 

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Can't say for certain but it's entirely possible the hull was molded with a 'cutout' for the ballast slug, and it's bolted into the cutout. It actually makes some sense as one of the biggest issues with 'in hull' ballast is the difficulty of dealing with any breaching of the outer skin in the ballast area - such as from grounding on a rock.

Fortunately you know who the builder was.. there's a hope of finding out. It should also be fairly evident upon personal inspection, esp if there is an issue with the fasteners.

I'd also suggest you don't get 'locked in' to this particular boat or design.. it's not the most inspired one out there..(IMO;))
 

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The old Endurances were not a half way bad boat other than most of them were concrete. Nonetheless no one would every have called them speedy.
 

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It is presumably an external ie separate lead keel. All keel bolts require periodic removal and checking, so the replacement is not that major a deal.
Replacing keel bolts in a lead keel IS a major deal. Melting the keel to one extent or another is pretty well always required since the "bolts" (studs actually) are cast into the keel in most cases.

Old style long ballast keels as used on wood full keelers are the exception since the bolts can go all the way through the ballast pig.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Never mind, guys. I went and inspected the boat in person today. The boat, in fact, has no keel bolts and the ballast is encapsulated in the molded keel.

The surveyor apparently mixed up boats as he was writing his report, because there were several other errors... including talking of the steering cables being serviceable when the boat has none (rack and pinion), the packing gland being suspect when the boat has none (dripless stuffing box) and miscellaneous other things. A lot of things were accurate, though, so he must have inspected more than one boat during the day and got the notes mixed up during the report writing. I'm glad I didn't pay him.

So the verdict is that the Endurance 35 (Spanish Belliure version anyways) has in fact an encapsulated ballast.

Thanks for all the replies though.

Regards,
-David

PS: I think the Endurance is a fantastic looking boat with a great cabin layout, that has apparently taken many people on extended voyages. If she's not too fast or the best one out there in someone else's opinion, who cares? She's a pretty tub and that's fine with me. You buy your boat I buy mine. Everyone has an a$-----... I mean opinion.
 

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There are lots of them around here because the DeKleer's built them locally in glass. I knew a guy who built one of their first hulls - they hadn't even built the deck mould at that point. He did a very nice job - teak deck etc.

I ran into him a few years later and he said it needed a lot more sail area - if he was doing it again he'd add 10' to the mast.
 
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