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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My Volvo MD2020 needs a touch up...to say the least... What is new in the world of engine paints? Any high temp epoxies? Primers?
 

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This may be a little OCD, but I would only paint an engine with the Volvo paint that was on it when it was made. They sell it in spray cans. Looks more professional.

If you ever sell your boat, the more it looks like a DIYer worked on the motor, the more nervous buyers get.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes, good point...
But the Volvo paint didn't last that well... Could there be other issues, like galvanic corrosion?
I am not too worried about what the next owner thinks about the color, he can have it repainted. So.. nothing fancy out there?
 

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Go to an automotive specialty shop that specializes in racing. You'll find literally hundreds of colors of high temp epoxy spray paints, also high temp epoxy chromate rich primers.
 

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As always, its all about prep. I would never want to properly prepare an engine for a proper new paint job. That's a ton of work. Perhaps even impossible with the engine in the boat. I just touch up, paint new parts before installing, etc. The one thing I never repaint are rubber hoses or plastic piping. I can't for the life of me understand why Volvo painted a cooling hose green. It starts cracking in it first hour.
 

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Once known as Hartley18
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This may be a little OCD, but I would only paint an engine with the Volvo paint that was on it when it was made. They sell it in spray cans. Looks more professional.

If you ever sell your boat, the more it looks like a DIYer worked on the motor, the more nervous buyers get.
"Volvo Green" is also horribly expensive.

FWIW, I've been using a can of ordinary automotive black engine enamel (which doesn't look too bad against the green - really! - since the non-Volvo hoses are black anyway) for the many frequent touch-ups and plan to respray with the Volvo stuff when (if) the boat is on the market.

By that stage I imagine the engine will be more black than green, but at least it won't be rusty to boot and I'll have saved a few $$ along the way.
 

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Hello there, as suggested above, a paint job is only as good as the preparation before it. It doesn't matter what kind of paint. If you want to properly paint your engine you must remove the alternator and tape all of your intake and other things you don't want painted. Prior to this you need to get some degreaser and a pressure washer that will remove any old flaking paint. Follow directions closely on the pressure washer and the degreaser.There are two types of high-temperature paint. 500° and above should not be necessary on anything except your direct exhaust. Considering the size of your engine it will not take very much paint, but the preparation is the most important factor. Also I agree that you should paint it with the original factory engine paint. Except for the exhaust that is not water cooled, that should be painted with BBQ paint 1200 to 1500°black. I hope I have been helpful to you and good luck.......CaptG
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
All good thoughts to consider...
What about the bolts that get unscrewed/screwed in the course of regular maintenance? Could they be replaced with stainless equivalents? None of them have grade ratings, I assume.. Has anyone come up with a livable solution?
 

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All good thoughts to consider...
What about the bolts that get unscrewed/screwed in the course of regular maintenance? Could they be replaced with stainless equivalents? None of them have grade ratings, I assume.. Has anyone come up with a livable solution?
Mixing metals can cause them to corrode together near permanently. In the right application, you can use tef-gel to prevent it.
 

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Say you degrease the engine, and remove loose rust, if you use the factory paint (or equal) do you prime first? If so, with what? I was planning on using the Moeller engine paint on my yanmar. Got some of the zinc Chromate primer and the top coat paint which I plan to use. Also have a can of the yanmar engine paint (dark silver).

If one were to only use the yanmar paint, do you just paint over bare metal and rust with it or do you need to prime? If I use the Moeller zinc chromate primer, is this ok to use on bare steel, iron, and the aluminum gear box?
 

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Once known as Hartley18
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All good thoughts to consider...
What about the bolts that get unscrewed/screwed in the course of regular maintenance? Could they be replaced with stainless equivalents? None of them have grade ratings, I assume.. Has anyone come up with a livable solution?
Basically, no. Don't do it. Not on a Volvo. The impact on your wallet of mixed-metal corrosion are not worth thinking about.
 

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Once known as Hartley18
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Say you degrease the engine, and remove loose rust, if you use the factory paint (or equal) do you prime first? If so, with what? I was planning on using the Moeller engine paint on my yanmar. Got some of the zinc Chromate primer and the top coat paint which I plan to use. Also have a can of the yanmar engine paint (dark silver).

If one were to only use the yanmar paint, do you just paint over bare metal and rust with it or do you need to prime? If I use the Moeller zinc chromate primer, is this ok to use on bare steel, iron, and the aluminum gear box?
I can only speak of touch-ups on my Volvo MD2040, but I've never primed before spraying with cheap engine enamel and have, to date, had no issues with the paint flaking off after de-greasing and de-rusting first.
 

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All good thoughts to consider...
What about the bolts that get unscrewed/screwed in the course of regular maintenance? Could they be replaced with stainless equivalents? None of them have grade ratings, I assume.. Has anyone come up with a livable solution?
BE CAREFUL!! It's not just about dissimilar metals corrosion - SS bolts do not have the tensile strength of steel bolts - especially Grade 5 or higher steel bolts. Put a SS bolt in the wrong place, and you could have engine parts joining you in the cockpit!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
You are right, Bellatrix...
There are also torque requirements to consider..
But as far as dissimilar metals go... the fuel pump front cover on my Volvo is aluminum...
Raw water pump is brass... and it all attaches to iron block! Dang, and it all gets painted with the same paint? What gives?
 

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Flat surface corrosion isn't going to be as tough as corrosion imbedded in the threads of a screw that won't back out.
 
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