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Discussion Starter #1
What are you guys thoughts on this damage on the bow? Big deal? Also I cant seem to figure out what engine this is. It's different than what sailboatdata says it is.
Need to know, I'm highly thinking about making the purchase.
Thanks in advance!
 

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Bow appearance looks like not-unusual dock rash. Engine is a puzzle.
Best you log in at the Ericson owners' main site and ask. There are some very helpful owners of sister ships there.
www.ericsonyachts.org

Fair winds.
 

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Sorry, I can't help with either question from those pics, but that is the strangest alternator tensioning system I've ever seen and should make it easy to identify the engine.
It sounds as though you are thinking of not having the boat surveyed. I'd advise against that course of action.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Bow appearance looks like not-unusual dock rash. Engine is a puzzle.
Best you log in at the Ericson owners' main site and ask. There are some very helpful owners of sister ships there.

Fair winds.
Thanks Olson. I didnt know about the Ericson ownders forum. I just now Registered. I'm guessing by "not-unusual" you mean "usual" dock rash? lol Sorry, the double negative is just throwing me off and I just want to make sure I understand.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Sorry, I can't help with either question from those pics, but that is the strangest alternator tensioning system I've ever seen and should make it easy to identify the engine.
It sounds as though you are thinking of not having the boat surveyed. I'd advise against that course of action.
Yea, my budget is small and the deal is hard to pass up. I could get convinced otherwise regarding the survey. He's only Asking $1500 and it has not been on the water since 1990. All rigging and sails included. Interior needs work and refinishing but looks original and in tact.
 

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If you aren't a very experienced boater a good survey will at least give you a list of jobs you'll need to do, from a professional.
I don't mean to dash your dreams, but a project boat usually costs more in the long run than a boat in good condition and you get to sail it instead of working on the project boat.
I believe the price of boats will drop precipitously in the next few months, so if you can wait and increase the amount you have to spend, you could do really well. Incredible deals are already starting to pop up down here, but the difficulty getting to the boat makes it near impossible to take advantage of them. A lot of people can't afford to pay storage on boats they can't get to or use for an indefinite time, so far from home.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
If you aren't a very experienced boater a good survey will at least give you a list of jobs you'll need to do, from a professional.
I don't mean to dash your dreams, but a project boat usually costs more in the long run than a boat in good condition and you get to sail it instead of working on the project boat.
I believe the price of boats will drop precipitously in the next few months, so if you can wait and increase the amount you have to spend, you could do really well.
That's a good point regarding getting the list of jobs instead of me trying to figure out what I need to work on. I'll start looking around for survey quotes. I appreciate you dashing my dreams. I need some reality checks - seriously. Anyway, I'm anticipating maybe a 3 year project boat. I want to really know the bits and bobs of the parts before sailing and I think the best way is to work on it.
 

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Capta is right about a survey being useful. Being there for the survey is always a valuable learning experience. The surveyor gets to point out things that are right as well as things that are wrong, while giving you good ideas about what is urgent and what isn’t. This can be very helpful in working up your to-do list.
 

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Yea, my budget is small and the deal is hard to pass up. I could get convinced otherwise regarding the survey. He's only Asking $1500 and it has not been on the water since 1990. All rigging and sails included. Interior needs work and refinishing but looks original and in tact.
Not being judgmental here; you cannot afford this boat. The bow damage appears to be minor, but the wiring is scary!

The most expensive boat that you can get is an unused fixer-upper. This boat hasn't been in the water in 30 years?!?!
There is probably a reason for that.

There is no such thing as a free boat.
 

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Rig up a bucket & hose to pick up cooling water from and try and start the engine - if it runs and the boat is $1500 I'd buy it.

I can't see spending 1/3 of the price of the boat on a survey.
 

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In addition to all comments above, what does the interior look like? are there signs of water intrusion particularly at the chain plate penetrations and the associated bulkheads? A small water intrusion over the bulkheads over 30 years could completely destroy the integrity of the bulkhead.

It may not necessarily be a dealbreaker on a $1,500 boat as repairing or replacing them is DIYable (but a big job), but know what you're getting into.
 

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I'd likely walk away unless I was a project person and I wanted to get into the unknown. Many people THINK they are project people...hence the huge number of unfinished projects sitting in boat yards and garages. Have you disassembled and rebuilt, from the ground up, a car or boat before? Did it take less than a year? If you can answer yes to both questions than you already know if this boat is for you or not. If you can't then... good luck either way.

The bow damage, well it looks cosmetic but you won't really know until you start grinding. Do you like to grind?

Even if the motor runs you will need to completely clean the tank, new standing rigging, new running rigging. You will need some electronics and electrical work.

It's likely a twelve thousand dollar boat as it sits, not including your labor. See what is out there for 12K, likely there are 12K boats that people put 20K - 30K into.
 

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I'd likely walk away unless I was a project person and I wanted to get into the unknown. Many people THINK they are project people...hence the huge number of unfinished projects sitting in boat yards and garages. Have you disassembled and rebuilt, from the ground up, a car or boat before? Did it take less than a year? If you can answer yes to both questions than you already know if this boat is for you or not. If you can't then... good luck either way.

The bow damage, well it looks cosmetic but you won't really know until you start grinding. Do you like to grind?

Even if the motor runs you will need to completely clean the tank, new standing rigging, new running rigging. You will need some electronics and electrical work.

It's likely a twelve thousand dollar boat as it sits, not including your labor. See what is out there for 12K, likely there are 12K boats that people put 20K - 30K into.
Agreed and let me add, putting new electronics, tanks, lines , rigging will not increase the potential resale value.
 

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Yea, my budget is small and the deal is hard to pass up. I could get convinced otherwise regarding the survey. He's only Asking $1500 and it has not been on the water since 1990. All rigging and sails included. Interior needs work and refinishing but looks original and in tact.
Buying a sailboat is often dirt cheap... Keeping it afloat and in a condition that it can be used as a sailboat, is expensive.... You have to keep a keelboat in the water, have you checked how much that will cost? Not trying to rain on your parade, but unless you have a boatload of money to put into it, you would be better off starting with something on a trailer.
 

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I can't even hazard a guess as to how much internal damage there must be from rain water intrusion in 30 years on the hard! How many times has she filled with water?

Ask the owner to pay you 20 grand and you'll dispose of it for him. Otherwise, run, don't walk, to your next choice.
 
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all the possible bad things you may find aside. you are going to triple the cost of the boat just getting it to the water, then the launch fee and mast stepping fee. you will then own a $5K boat. even if you only spend another 3k for parts and do all the labor yourself. you could buy an $8k boat ready to go and you will be getting a boat at half the cost of that boat by the time it is done and save your self years doing it
 

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I owned a group owned E32-2, it should have an Atomic -4 gas engine. This looks like a diesel.

If you can't afford a survey you can't afford this boat. A $500 survey may tell you to avoid buying this boat, for a savings of $1000. You could easily spend $20k to get this boat to a valued at half that.
 

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At LEAST find a friend experienced with boats to go over it carefully with you. You want to avoid the big expensive issues like rotten core in the deck. If there's nothing major structurally, sails are serviceable, and engine runs, you can take a chance. Just note summer slip costs and winter storage will quickly exceed the initial cost of the boat.
 

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A boat that hasn’t been used since 1990 is a key here.
Even if you can afford the initial price which is virtually nothing, can you really afford to put the work and effort
To make it sailable. Can you afford the normal annual upkeep. Many posts on here will give you what that
May be. Then can you afford the slip fees, bottom paint, hauling , insurance, lisences each year.

Owning a keel boat is an expensive proposition with many costs not visible after the purchase price.
Also know.....you get what you pay for. Most bargain boats are those in continuous use whose owner either had to get out or can’t afford to operate annually any more. There are bargains to be found.

I would Run from this and find something more appropriate
 
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