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While hunting for LED lights for my boat, I found this on Kmart. for $24.00 (not sure exact price).

It basically is a LED flashlight that has on the back end a built in cigarette plug to recharge the flash light.

It fully charges in 1 hour. as they claim. It's very bright, and saves having to carry batteries on the boat.

I think its a good find, so I share with you.



See HERE
 

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I got three Chinese knockoffs of this type for about $9 each two years ago. I keep them in various places. They hold a charge in their capacitors for a few hours.



Nightstar CS2 Renewable Induction LED Flashlight

I find there are a number of little gadgets made for RVs, autos or camping that have a place on a boat.
 

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If these are the shake to charge type flashlights, be aware that they have a pretty hefty magnet in them and will screw up your compass if too close to it. This applies to both the magnetic and fluxgate compass for your autopilot. :)
I got three Chinese knockoffs of this type for about $9 each two years ago. I keep them in various places. They hold a charge in their capacitors for a few hours.



Nightstar CS2 Renewable Induction LED Flashlight

I find there are a number of little gadgets made for RVs, autos or camping that have a place on a boat.
 

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Valiente-

If these are the shake to charge type flashlights, be aware that they have a pretty hefty magnet in them and will screw up your compass if too close to it. This applies to both the magnetic and fluxgate compass for your autopilot. :)
I knew that, SD, but thanks for the reminder. I don't use them near the helm, but having a steel boat, I am already "magnetism-aware". My wife is already tired about me discussing my "massive soft iron compensating balls" on my Globemaster.

All jokes aside, both the big balls and the magnetic flashlights work well.

The "shake-and-shines" stay mainly in the safety gear box we bring into the tenders along with the old GPS, the throw line, signal mirror and hand flares. I found that spare batteries for a more typical light just wouldn't last more than a year in there.
 

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A couple of years ago, CW had a piece on the value of having just about every conceivable kind of lighting on the boat for convenience as well as in the event of an emergency. The list included those day-glo sticks that become luminsecent once crimped, shake flashlights, rechargeable battery flashlights, kerosene lamps, and on and on and on...
 

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The real question is what are they compensating for??? :D Sorry...had to be said...:)
I knew that, SD, but thanks for the reminder. I don't use them near the helm, but having a steel boat, I am already "magnetism-aware". My wife is already tired about me discussing my "massive soft iron compensating balls" on my Globemaster.

All jokes aside, both the big balls and the magnetic flashlights work well.

The "shake-and-shines" stay mainly in the safety gear box we bring into the tenders along with the old GPS, the throw line, signal mirror and hand flares. I found that spare batteries for a more typical light just wouldn't last more than a year in there.
 
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