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I'm a really old (77), overweight, and lazy fart that raises the main sail on his 33 Morgan Out Island without breaking into a sweat. Never really thought about it, and never need to use the winch. I pull down using my 225 pound body, and the sail goes up. Nothing to it!

Before I got an electric windless for the boat, I hauled a 42-pound anchor attached to 50-feet of chain out of the mud on a regular basis, again, no sweat.

Now, maybe it would have been easier if I were in my 50s, slim, trim and getting ogled by the ladies. Ha! That's never gonna happen again, but I sure enjoyed those days.

Good Luck,

Gary :cool:
 

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Sea legs - a term which I suppose means getting accustomed to the constant motion of the boat and not getting sea sick or even slightly so. It takes some time for you body to make the adjustment but it seems to sick for quite some time. After 5 or 6 months not being on the boat it takes me about a half an hr of sailing motion.. to adjust and then I seem to be fine for the rest of the season. I don't normally get sea sick... but have been a few times is very nasty conditions. But that's not bad for over 30 years of sailing. Wifey on the other hand was very prone to sea sickness and it's taken her maybe 10 years to feel comfortable and not get sea sick. She now misses the boat in the winter!
 

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I'm a really old (77), overweight, and lazy fart that raises the main sail on his 33 Morgan Out Island without breaking into a sweat. Never really thought about it, and never need to use the winch. I pull down using my 225 pound body, and the sail goes up. Nothing to it!

Before I got an electric windless for the boat, I hauled a 42-pound anchor attached to 50-feet of chain out of the mud on a regular basis, again, no sweat.

Now, maybe it would have been easier if I were in my 50s, slim, trim and getting ogled by the ladies. Ha! That's never gonna happen again, but I sure enjoyed those days.

Good Luck,

Gary :cool:

That's great. Now, to be clear, I'm not talking about some 250 sq.ft. rag that weighs 30 lbs. Those I can hoist with one hand. The mainsail has a full roach, made of some heavy multi-ply material, is ~650 sq.ft., weighs upwards of 100 lbs even without the 6 battens inserted, and resembles an X-ray blanket more than it does a typical Dacron bedsheet. It's just a different weight category than a 33-footer with a masthead rig and a small main.
 

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I weighed my main, mainly because It felt pretty damned heavy when I was dragging it to the van a couple years ago. If I recall correctly, it tipped the scales at just over 80 pounds with the battens removed. 30 pounds would have been a dream to hoist - coulda' done it with one hand tied behind my back. ;)

I'm fairly confident I could hoist a 100 pound plus main a few years ago, but since my back and lungs are shot to Hell, I wouldn't even attempt it. I'll stick with what I have for as long as I can still single hand the boat, and when I can't I'll sell it, or maybe give it to one of the kids if they want it. :)

All the best,

Gary :cool:
 

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Cara - Sunny Sailor
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Discussion Starter #27
I'm a really old (77), overweight, and lazy fart that raises the main sail on his 33 Morgan Out Island without breaking into a sweat. Never really thought about it, and never need to use the winch. I pull down using my 225 pound body, and the sail goes up. Nothing to it!

Before I got an electric windless for the boat, I hauled a 42-pound anchor attached to 50-feet of chain out of the mud on a regular basis, again, no sweat.

Now, maybe it would have been easier if I were in my 50s, slim, trim and getting ogled by the ladies. Ha! That's never gonna happen again, but I sure enjoyed those days.

Good Luck,

Gary :cool:
As my husband would say, It doesn't matter that your looks may be waning as you get older, because my eye sight is failing! :laugh
 

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Cara - Sunny Sailor
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Discussion Starter #28
Sea legs - a term which I suppose means getting accustomed to the constant motion of the boat and not getting sea sick or even slightly so. It takes some time for you body to make the adjustment but it seems to sick for quite some time. After 5 or 6 months not being on the boat it takes me about a half an hr of sailing motion.. to adjust and then I seem to be fine for the rest of the season. I don't normally get sea sick... but have been a few times is very nasty conditions. But that's not bad for over 30 years of sailing. Wifey on the other hand was very prone to sea sickness and it's taken her maybe 10 years to feel comfortable and not get sea sick. She now misses the boat in the winter!
I always wondered if sea legs was the term for when you still feel like you are on a boat when you walk on land (the movement thingie) or if it was the term for getting used to being on the boat. Maybe I should ask this question in a forum and see what most folks say!
 

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That's great. Now, to be clear, I'm not talking about some 250 sq.ft. rag that weighs 30 lbs. Those I can hoist with one hand. The mainsail has a full roach, made of some heavy multi-ply material, is ~650 sq.ft., weighs upwards of 100 lbs even without the 6 battens inserted, and resembles an X-ray blanket more than it does a typical Dacron bedsheet. It's just a different weight category than a 33-footer with a masthead rig and a small main.
You have a 650 square foot main sail on a 40 ft boat and it weighs over 100 lbs?

That is quiet unusual. The specs for the Freedom 40 show a 483 square foot sail. Did you have it custom made to increase the area? How did that affect the balance?

For comparison purposes, the main on my Bristol 40 is 316 square feet and needs to be reefed pretty early. My entire sail area is 650 square feet with the genoa, less with the working jib I usually use in SF bay. I realize the displacement on the Freedom is larger, but why on earth would you need a 650 square foot main sail on a 40 foot boat?
 

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bell ringer
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I take it all back. I had the main reefed earlier today but the wind died down so decided to it take out and hoist the sail up the rest of the way. This is a lot harder than hoisting the sail normally because the reefing lines need to be pulled back through the blocks and that a lot of extra fiction. I did it on my full battened full roach main while my wife was down in the head.

When she came back up she said “ Damn you look all buff and hot, I want you!”

Ain’t sailing grand?
 

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Too funny but true.
As long as your hands work and you have a decent power grasp raising up to ~150lbs of main should be minimal work as you should be able to jump it.
Grinding isn’t much work unless you’re racing something over 50ft. You tack rarely and do so fairly slowly on a cruising boat. Once you get good at it very little winch work is required.
Core stabilization offers many minimal caloric demand or exercise. Sealegs is irreverent as you mostly sit on a boat. Even on passage.
Rather everything is harder on a boat. All the activities of daily living. More reaching, bending and stretching. You swim more, hike more and are more active when the boat is still. There’s less nervous eating or eating due to boredom. There’s limited or no access to junk food. You only need to be strong once when in the grocery as there’s no temptions when the boat is moving.
You need to be fit to cruise and you know that so you make better decisions. I come off the boat unless I’m careful I have weak legs and poor endurance as work is brief even when intense. The one exception is helming in weather but that’s quite rare. I try to go up/down the companion way to exhaustion which does prevent that or swim daily which works even better and is easy on my knees.
 

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Too funny but true.
As long as your hands work and you have a decent power grasp raising up to ~150lbs of main should be minimal work as you should be able to jump it.
Grinding isn’t much work unless you’re racing something over 50ft. You tack rarely and do so fairly slowly on a cruising boat. Once you get good at it very little winch work is required.
Core stabilization offers many minimal caloric demand or exercise. Sealegs is irreverent as you mostly sit on a boat. Even on passage.
Rather everything is harder on a boat. All the activities of daily living. More reaching, bending and stretching. You swim more, hike more and are more active when the boat is still. There’s less nervous eating or eating due to boredom. There’s limited or no access to junk food. You only need to be strong once when in the grocery as there’s no temptions when the boat is moving.
You need to be fit to cruise and you know that so you make better decisions. I come off the boat unless I’m careful I have weak legs and poor endurance as work is brief even when intense. The one exception is helming in weather but that’s quite rare. I try to go up/down the companion way to exhaustion which does prevent that or swim daily which works even better and is easy on my knees.
This is a great post! Having recently had back surgery I face the "difficulty" of sailing. Most of the "trouble" is walking to the boat/dinghy from the parking lot! Cruising is rather sedentary until you have to deal with heavier weather.

I used millie to raise the main.
tacking unless in a narrow channel is not frequent and done w/ AP and a little trim.
anchoring with windlass and foot switches

So there is LITTLE exercise on a boat and that IS a problem... and a boat can be set up for old salts.
 

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bell ringer
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bell ringer
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I'm going beer hiking this evening. Taking the dinghy to the town dock and hiking to the top of the ramp and across the the 50' parking lot to the brewpub. Real cruisers know where they can stop to get hikes in!
 
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