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Hello all and thanks in advance.

I bought a new Jeanneau 379 this year. I've only been sailing a few years and this is my first boat. My family is about to make our first cruising trip lasting for 2 days. That said, my boat has everything it requires to sail well and safely, but what extra rope/lines would you recommend I have on board to make this as safe as possible? A spare halyard, sheets, preventer line? And what types of line are the "best" in your opinion for those purposes? We sail in Lake Ontario.

Again, thank you for your help.
 

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We don't carry spare halyards and sheets, but we do have at least a set and a half of extra dock lines. Any old lines go into the line locker for whatever comes up. We rarely retire a line completely unless it is totally useless.

I don't know that I've ever met anyone who carries spare halyards and sheets. Actually, I've never asked so who knows? Perhaps the offshore people do. I don't race and sail in protected water so it hasn't been something to put on my checklist.

Thinking this through some more: when we do replace the halyards and sheets that came with the boat, then yes, I guess we will have spares.
 

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I carry an extra halyard and a backup set of heavy weather jib sheets. They are the best halyard and sheets that came with the boat (I've replaced most of the running rigging). I also have a couple of pieces of assorted short line lengths (30ish feet) that could be used as reefs, cunninghams, traveler lines, or anything else in a pinch. The old halyard can also do the job as a main sheet (it would be too long, but that's better than too short).

Basically as you replace running rigging keep around the best of the old stuff as spares. My spare halyard and sheets are in deep storage on the boat and don't weigh much, they are more useful spares to me than something like a spare alternator and about the same weight.
 

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Around here, if you want to dock at the mooring buoys in Ayala Cove, you need two 200ft lines. (I don't have them...one day?)

Apart from that, yes you'll want to leave your docking lines at the slip so you need a second set.

The most useful line I have had, is a 6ft length of 1/4" Amsteel. It has been used to rig a temporary attachment where the main sheet block failed and once where a boomvang came away from the boom. Can be used as a temporary replacement for most shackles.
 

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+1 on the dock lines and fenders. Sail tape, rigging and duct tape (white)
I pick up spool ends at my local chandlery for less than $5. They become extra sail ties, etc. Pick up an 80 to 100 length of 3/8 Sta Set or the like from Ebay. It can be the gybe preventer or anything else you need. I also carry 60 feet of 3/8 Amsteel for a spare stay, but I race offshore. It is only useful if someone is willing to go up the mast!
Check for chafe when you hoist/lower sails. With a new boat you should not have issues, but cotter pins can catch stuff.
 

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I bring my docking lines with me, but also have some spares. I need 3 lines to dock the boat in most slips and carry 6 of them. I prefer docking with the lines attached to the boat than with the lines attached to the dock. This is doubly true when I'm single handing.
 

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Hey,

I have bought all of my boats used and they all came with various bits of old line. I have never needed to change a halyard or sheet (always changed 'em before hand) but extra line always comes in handy to tie an inner-tube to the boat so you don't float away when swimming, to hoist the solar shower up the mast a bit, to rig a quick preventer on the boom, to lash down a sail cover when the zipper fails, and so on.

I wouldn't buy anything expensive but a roll of clothesline is cheap and will do most things in a pinch.

Barry
 

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Randy, congratulations on your new boat! I had the opportunity to climb all over one at the boat show and I thought it was very nice. You will have a fine time on your first weekend cruise. Don’t over think your spares at this point as you're are not crossing the Atlantic – yet. The biggest enemies to your running rigging are chafe and meat hooks. Make sure your (lazy) sheet isn’t pressing against the standing rigging or you will chafe through the cover in no time at all (have I got a photo for you!). Go around and tape over all cotter pins – even the split ring types. Now might be a good time to put a wrench (or shackle key) on all your screw type shackles. I mouse mine with small plastic cable ties to avoid meet hooks.

If your local conditions run towards light breezes, you might want to consider getting some “dental floss” aka light air sheets. Having some extra cordage around can be helpful like a downhaul to keep the main from slatting etc.

We carry a nice set of “visiting docklines” on board and keep the ratty ones at our home dock. Our Ayala Cove is a pain to moor. I use my spare anchor line and an 80’ length of three strand there. the three strand doubles over as a tow line if the need should arise.
 

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My family is about to make our first cruising trip lasting for 2 days.
Have a great time.

what extra rope/lines would you recommend I have on board to make this as safe as possible?
The ones on a Towboat/US or SeaTow tow boat. An unlimited tow policy is the best insurance you can carry for your family and friends.

The only really useful place for a spare halyard is rigged.

I have two main halyards, two jib halyards, a spinnaker halyard, a staysail halyard, and a pole lift all in place in the mast. For context I am a regular offshore sailor. This would be gross overkill for local and inshore sailing.

Story: I lost a jib halyard between Norfolk and Abaco in the middle of the night (of course). The sail started to came down and the watch was yelling for help (bless him he followed my boat rule that no one goes forward without someone else on deck). The rest of us boiled up and we were able to keep the sail on the boat and lashed to the lines. We used the rigged messenger to pull the spare jib halyard down from the masthead, connected it to the sail, and hauled it back up. Took about 45 minutes which is pretty good (I think) for middle of the night in F6 and 8' seas.

I strongly recommend a dedicated preventer. Preventers should run from the aft end of the boom forward to the bow and back to the cockpit; I run mine to a stern cleat. There are some very cool and helpful ways to rig this to make life simpler but for a boat the size of yours 90 to 100' of line should do fine. There is a lot of discussion about whether a preventer should be stretchy to absorb energy or inelastic to keep motion down. I am firmly in the camp of inelastic along with people like Evans Starzinger and Beth Leonard. Keep the boom from moving and energy doesn't build up. That means some version of double-braid line of a more sophisticated material like Sta-Set X.

It makes sense to have dock lines. Like Donna I have two-and-a-half sets of dock lines - one for the slip that stay behind (currently stored since we are on a mooring), one "traveling set" and some extra. A "set" for me is two bow lines about half a boat length, two stern lines the same length, and two stern lines about three-quarters of a boat length. If you make your own (recommended) make sure you buy enough line to allow for the eye splices. My extras are long (40 or 50 feet). They are often used when we double lines back from the dock to the boat so we can leave without needing either assistance or to put crew on the dock (especially important when there is no crew *grin*). Dock lines should be a good quality three-strand line for shock absorption. Ultimately you'll want some kind of chafe protection (I don't remember what the leads on a Jeanneau 379 are like) but for starters old dish towels from home will do fine.

I have a lot of other line on the boat. I tend to buy spools and when it is used up (which takes quite a while) I get more. I carry 100 meters of 16mm (about 5/8") three-strand that will be a good bit of my next set of dock lines when the oldest set reaches end of life. I have about 80 meters of 12mm general purpose double-braid. I carry about 25 meters of 6mm double braid and 20 meters of 1.5 mm double braid. Sorry about the metrics - I have a European boat and it has been easier to keep track of things in the original measuring system.

I also have other bits and pieces of line that have accumulated (usually cut off the spools).

The extra three-strand usually ends up as dock lines and I buy a new spool, although a few times I've used the whole spool to tow someone. I haven't used much of the big double braid. The only thing that comes to mind is splicing 10 feet or so onto the handle of a rubber bucket. I go through a lot of 6mm double braid for lashings and fender whips; we use the same stuff to teach knots to people and let them practice. The small stuff gets used a lot for minor lashings, including keeping halyards from slapping, flag halyards, keeping the dinghy gas tank from drifting around in the dinghy, tying up coils of water hose and shore power cords, tying tools to the bosun's chair when I'm up the mast, and other odds and ends.

You could certainly be safe with much shorter lengths than I carry. You can skip the big double braid entirely and cut down on the two smaller sizes. Learn to splice three-strand (if you or your wife can braid hair you can splice three-strand). You'll save a ton of money in your sailing career. Splicing double braid is only a little more difficult but does require a few tools. You can splice three strand with your hands, a knife, and lighter.

Have a great cruise.
 

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Now might be a good time to put a wrench (or shackle key) on all your screw type shackles. I mouse mine with small plastic cable ties to avoid meet hooks.
A meat hook is a strand of wire rope (whether sanding rigging, a halyard, or lifeline) that has parted and sticks out. I'm not clear how taping or mousing shackles has anything to do with avoiding meat hooks.
 

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For offshore racing we carry at a minumm one halyard (the longest on the boat), a replacement set of sheets, and 100' of 1/4" endurabraid.

For a two day cruise... Nothing. If your stuff will break in that period of time you need to replace it now anyway.
 

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For offshore racing we carry at a minumm one halyard (the longest on the boat)
Do you carry it because the rules you race under tell you that you have to or because you think it is a good idea. If a halyard fails offshore just how to expect to replace it? Do you have a halyard already in place to go up on or do you have to drop your other working sail to go up the stick? Steps?
 

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SVAuspicious, what do you call the ends of cotter pins and split rings that stick out and grab your running rigging, pulling the core outside the cover? (I'll edit my note for clarity) Tapping is to cover up those ends so they don't grab any line and checking shackles that they are still tight (and mousing them so they stay that way) is a good thing on new boats.
 

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Do you carry it because the rules you race under tell you that you have to or because you think it is a good idea. If a halyard fails offshore just how to expect to replace it? Do you have a halyard already in place to go up on or do you have to drop your other working sail to go up the stick? Steps?
No rules that I'm aware of. You should have a spare halyard to your spare halyard. Most race boats have one main, one jib and 2 spin halyards. If you lose one, there are options to go up under sail and replace it. If you must drop a sail, then you drop one, and go up on that halyard.

The best strategy is going up the rig before it breaks to inspect the masthead for chafe. On our last race to Bermuda I insisted that someone go up twice to inspect the main halyard and jib/spin halyards for chafe. On a frac rig, once the main halyard parts, things get interesting.
 

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My family is about to make our first cruising trip lasting for 2 days. what extra rope/lines would you recommend I have on board .
Hey Randy, Congratulations!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I would take nothing except what you've got.

Then over your short cruise see if you feel the need for something. I doubt you will come racing back and run to the Chandler throwing money around.

if you need a spare halyard or sheets then theres some serious problem with your new boat and the manufacturer better hear about it!

On my last long set of passages from Australia, through the Indian Ocean, Med and Atlantic, I was a bit on the poor side :rolleyes: and lots of my running rigging was running out of life, so I bought ONE long line I could use as the spare for anything. I still have that rope all nice and new down below somewhere...
So unless you are rich and dumb I think you can leave your wallet in your pocket this trip. Go enjoy it and have some note paper for your thoughts.

:)


Mark
 
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If you want spare lines that's a good excuse to replace a couple existing ones, and keep the old ones as spares.

It's certainly a good idea to have extra lines though you don't need to go crazy if you're not going offshore.
 

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SVAuspicious, what do you call the ends of cotter pins and split rings that stick out and grab your running rigging, pulling the core outside the cover?
Ah. Now I know what you were referring to. Those aren't "meat hooks" but I'm not sure there is a specific name for them. Your advice to tape them is exactly the right thing. Mousing shackles is good practice also. I only use wire ties on shackles I expect to take off regularly. Other shackles, particularly aloft, get moused with stainless steel or monel safety wire and taped.

No rules that I'm aware of. You should have a spare halyard to your spare halyard. Most race boats have one main, one jib and 2 spin halyards. If you lose one, there are options to go up under sail and replace it. If you must drop a sail, then you drop one, and go up on that halyard.

The best strategy is going up the rig before it breaks to inspect the masthead for chafe. On our last race to Bermuda I insisted that someone go up twice to inspect the main halyard and jib/spin halyards for chafe. On a frac rig, once the main halyard parts, things get interesting.
I definitely agree that inspection and maintenance is best practice. I fully understand going up twice (presumably on two different halyards) so you can inspect the working length of all the halyards, including the ones you go up on.

Rigging two main halyards on most boats is pretty easy, especially if there is a solid vang so you can use the sheave for a topping lift. On a fractional rig having a second main halyard in place offshore is even more important.

Personally I think two jib halyards are more important than two spinnaker halyards, and a single fully overriding spinnaker halyard is more effective than those that can get tangled as you gybe back and forth. On fractionals with masthead spinnakers two spinnaker halyards seems odd to me.

You said: "If you must drop a sail, then you drop one, and go up on that halyard."

One sail is down due to a failed halyard. Drop the other and you are bare poles, adrift (assuming racing rules for the event would DSQ you for putting the engine in gear), and trying to run a new halyard through the mast (not using external halyards I suspect). A masthead casting or forging with more sheaves and possibly some mast sheaves lower down on a fractional rig seem inexpensive insurance to me with minimal additional weight aloft. YMMV.
 

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Do you carry it because the rules you race under tell you that you have to or because you think it is a good idea. If a halyard fails offshore just how to expect to replace it? Do you have a halyard already in place to go up on or do you have to drop your other working sail to go up the stick? Steps?
1) there are no rules I am aware of that require extra halyards. But for offshore work it's a pretty good bet we would eventually break one. Of course we also loaded everything to the limit, and used the smallest a line we could justify to keep weight down. Including replacing the slack halyards with chase lines when they weren't in use.

2) to replace a halyard we sent someone up the mast. The boat I am thinking if had eight halyards... Two main, two masthead spin, two fractional spin, and two fractional jib. So finding a spare halyard wasn't much of an issue.

3) we never dropped sails to go up. If a halyard popped we got the sail up first, then sent someone up the mast.

For the main we also generally used a mast strop from the head of the sail to the crane, so the main halyard could be slacked. Of course is meant that to reef you had to send someone to the top of the mast first, so in questionable weather it was a bad LAN.


Today I would highly recommend people look at halyard locks if they weren't so expensive. But they are a great way to eliminate the possibility of halyards breaking.
 

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I think the meat hook he was referring to is the seizing wire itself. It's hard to tie that off without exposed wire "hooks" that can really rip into your hands. I've experienced that firsthand...
 

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Personally I think two jib halyards are more important than two spinnaker halyards, and than those that can get tangled as you gybe back and forth..
You can usually fly a jib from a spin halyard but not the other way around. Boats typically come with a main halyard, jib halyard and 2 wing halyards. Race boats add a lot more. Your bowman should be able to keep your halyards straight. If not, get another bowman.

a single fully overriding spinnaker halyard is more effective... On fractionals with masthead spinnakers two spinnaker halyards seems odd to me
How on earth do you propose you do a spin peel with only one masthead spin hal? You would only be able to peel to the fractional halyard, which you prefer to be a jib halyard, which is usually under the forestay??? Gybe puts it over the forestay, and chafe ensues.

You said: "If you must drop a sail, then you drop one, and go up on that halyard." One sail is down due to a failed halyard. Drop the other and you are bare poles, adrift. YMMV.
My point was to change out the halyard before it failed.
 
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