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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I'm looking for advice on how to finish a recoring project. I've recored around the deadlights on a Tanzer 22 and need to make everything look nice again. I removed the interior fiberglass skin for the recoring and have epoxied it back in place. Now I need to decide how to proceed. Should I sand out a wider "v" in the cut and just fill it with epoxy fairing compound (followed by primer/paint), or do I need to do it the "right" way and sand a 12:1 bevel which I fill with fiberglass cloth and then fair?

I ask because most of the recoring examples I've seen are on the exterior. This isn't a structural seam, and it doesn't need to be waterproof. As such, I'm hoping I might be able to get away with just epoxy fairing (much quicker, especially the sanding prep).

I would appreciate any advice, particularly from someone who has made a similar repair. Thanks.

Picture for context, further pictures can be found on our website.
 

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yup

here ya go



and



used a product called jet bond to fair...

after it cures sand smooth and repaint

your cabin sides are in much better shape than mine were after taking off the veneer

good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
If I take the epoxy only route, I intend to use fumed silica thickened epoxy to do the majority of the filling (for strength and because I find it easy to work with) and finish it off with either West System's 410 microlight filler or System Three's Quick Fair (simply because that is what I have on hand).

christian.hess, have you sailed since making your repair? The only reason I can imagine glass being useful in this situation is to prevent cracking around the faired joints (since the epoxy will flex differently than the surrounding glass).

tommays, nice work, that could not have been an easy job overhead. I'll remember that when I get frustrated working on a vertical surface. And sanding is the worst, I'd much rather be sailing or doing just about anything else.
 

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If I take the epoxy only route, I intend to use fumed silica thickened epoxy to do the majority of the filling (for strength and because I find it easy to work with) and finish it off with either West System's 410 microlight filler or System Three's Quick Fair (simply because that is what I have on hand).

christian.hess, have you sailed since making your repair? The only reason I can imagine glass being useful in this situation is to prevent cracking around the faired joints (since the epoxy will flex differently than the surrounding glass).

tommays, nice work, that could not have been an easy job overhead. I'll remember that when I get frustrated working on a vertical surface. And sanding is the worst, I'd much rather be sailing or doing just about anything else.
hi...what glass are you reffering to? the cabin sides have been faired after removing the wood veneer

its jetbond which is a chemically hardened bondo type fairing compound, then primer, then paint

no glass was used on the sides

the glass you might be reffering to is from the new bulkheads and filleting done

cheers
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
hi...what glass are you reffering to? the cabin sides have been faired after removing the wood veneer

its jetbond which is a chemically hardened bondo type fairing compound, then primer, then paint

no glass was used on the sides

the glass you might be reffering to is from the new bulkheads and filleting done

cheers
Sorry, my mistake, I'm working from my own paradigm. I cut off the interior glass "skin," removed the core material and then put it all back together with new plywood (reusing the old glass skin). From the picture I thought you had done the same, but you replaced the wood veneer completely with jet bond, correct? Has it dealt well with flexing?
 

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no not yet but its really firm...Ive seen other model boats like mine do the same, remove the veneer and fair...yes its thin, but i dont see an issue structurally at least...the veneer added no stiffness or strength to my eyes...

I thought about adding wood again but the issue with that was water intrusion and basically more work anytime I have to mess with the windows, or add hardware etc...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I thought I'd post an update in case anyone else is performing similar work on their boat.

I opted for the 'hard way' taking an angle grinder to the seam, using glass tape to build it back up, and then fairing over it with System Three QuikFair before painting it with Pettit Ez Cabin Coat. Here are some pictures, or you can also find the details on our webpage.
 

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Yeah, J; nice job!.

I'da been tempted to glue a thin batten of teak to the join and been done with it. ;)
Prolly gonna go solid on my foredeck,tho. Just can'tseethe utility of a core when stiffener ribs and additional layers will accomplish the same. The original FG liner got toasted with removal, so paint it will be. I kinda likethe texpture of CSM done up in off-white. ;)
Sidedecks areanother issue, tho. Gonna hafta gho outside for them, I believe
 

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Wow, it amazes me how many of us are crazy enough to do this job. Great work.

I did my re core from the top, so my sanding and fairing was physically easier. I used West System with low density filler. I sanded so much my wife started calling me Dusty because every day I would come home covered.

Two seasons later, no crazing or cracking.

Skywalker
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Skywalker,

Yes, it is amazing what we will do for our boats, isn't it? Sanding from the outside would have been a much more pleasant experience, I'm sure. The only reason I did it from the inside was because I knew I wouldn't have a cover over the boat for the entire project, so it was the only way to keep things dry. I definitely wouldn't recommend recoring from the inside if it can be helped.

I thought I'd attach another shot (the only one I have so far of the finished product with the boat mostly put back together). I'm cooking our first meal on the boat, but more importantly, once all the pieces go back on (new bulkheads, refinished trip, fruit hammock), it is next to impossible to notice that any work was done.
 

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