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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have failed to repair my fiberglass.
between the black and fresh tanks in my bilge is a fiberglass wall. The seal broke at the top of the wall, letting fresh water flood into the black tank. How may I seal this?
The issue is the inspection hole is 2' from the wall that needs repaired, and my first blind repair attempt looked like this:


I can confirm I just tested it, and it does not work.
My next thought is to drill a few 2" holes along the top where the two meet up, and work thru those small holes to patch it much better.
I am wide open to suggestions on this one. The first idea I had failed, and the second may fail as well, or worse, cause damage.
 

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what did you attempt to seal it with? your choice of materials may have a great impact on any possibility of further success.


My gut tells me you're gonna have to get out the jigsaw and cut large access holes into he top of the tanks, clean the short-cut crap out of the seam, properly fillet and fiberglass both sides, then reseal the top of the tanks. you might be better off gutting and cutting and installing proper tanks.
 

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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
When a boat is built they lay down the tank dividers, then lay down the fiberglass subfloor.
So these tanks may share a top, and bottom, but the seal between the top and sides has broken. They are integral to the bilge.
The black tank has not been used in a long time, years.

The repair I tried was fiberglass cloth, and epoxy. The right materials, applied in the blind, incorrectly.

Yes, cutting a large opening in the black tank may be the answer, then epoxy the large cut out piece back on when done.
 

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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
easy inexpensive fix.
cut access hole.
insert bladder tank.
plumb new bladder tank.
quit beating yourself up trying to "fix" the poor aged design.
Any links to where I might buy one would be GREAT!
 

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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Personally I think $300 is quite cheap to ensure my fresh water supply doesn't end of full of sewage, but maybe that's just me.
We dont use the black tank right now, and the only reason the fresh flows into the black is if we overfill the tank.
 

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This is an unusual construction method ( and one I would personally avoid) its been a longtime since builders used integral tanks. descrete drop in tanks are a much better solution and this has been the norm for a long time. Poly tanks are better for freshwater (or stainless) and if there is an issue they can be removed and repaired.
 

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Schooner Captain
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
This is an unusual construction method ( and one I would personally avoid) its been a longtime since builders used integral tanks. descrete drop in tanks are a much better solution and this has been the norm for a long time. Poly tanks are better for freshwater (or stainless) and if there is an issue they can be removed and repaired.
Yes, but my goodness. Tanks on boats today are so tiny. I have 140 gallons of fuel, 30 gallons black, and over 200 fresh. I see new boats the same size with 80 gallons of diesel, and 100 gallons of water.
 
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