SailNet Community banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Reaction score
1
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted on this a while ago but I am just now able to get started.


THe first question is, can I repair this without removing the hardware- if not, i could use some suggestions to get the hardware off.

The large countersunk stainless screws have double nuts on the back, i managed to force the outer ones off but they fought all the way and were too hot to touch when i finished. With just a screw slot to grab on I can't imagine how I'll get the inner nuts off.


So I'm considering whether or not a proper repair can be made with everything in place.

I figure I can push the glass back together with lots or epoxy, clamp it in place, and add reinforcing straps of epoxy and fiberglass cloth.

It's under a substantial load so I want some input as to whether or not this is sound thinking.

Thanks
 

Attachments

· Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Reaction score
1
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It just looks as if the anchor shank has chipped the edges unless I am missing something in the photo..
Not exactly, the whole mess stove in several inches, it has been pushed back almost to the correct position in the photos. The forestay also attaches to this massive hunk of metal. So i need the replicate the original strength.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Reaction score
1
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
OK, - any suggestions on where to order those screws? I've never seen stainless countersunk screws 1/2" X 2" in the bin at Ace Hardware. :confused:
 

· Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Reaction score
1
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
About 20 years ago, a yard did this job for me for $3000. You should consider very carefully whether you should take this on yourself.
Don't worry, this forum is not my only source of guidance. I have several mentors for the actual appliation of the glass when the time comes but I like to approach those guys with some sort of plan lest they argue amongst themselves how to advise me.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Reaction score
1
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
moving right along....

Grinding off the bolts was a much better idea than trying to save them.

Now with everything off i have a better idea how to apporach this.

The 'box' was part of the original mold. it was very thin. after the mold they apprently did what i am planing to do. Using the molded box as a guide they added several layers of glass on both sides to provide the strength then drilled holes to mount the anchor roller.

I will grind most of the old glass off, and rebuild. The bulk of the work is inside the anchor locker so there are no cosmetic challenges.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Reaction score
1
Discussion Starter · #15 ·
You are not doing a repair. It failed because it wasn't strong enough before. So it has to be reengineered as well, so it doesn't happen again. Sometimes you get lucky, and WHY it failed is obvious. That is the case with the keel on my ETAP 26. The problem is so obvious the designer should have been fired.

Gary H. Lucas
Not exactly- I lost reverse while approaching a steel bulkhead with a seven ton boat. I'd say the failure was right in the margins of expected performance.

This is a Nicholson 31- it is included in John Vigor's "20 Small Sailboats to Take you Anywhere" and James Baldwin's Good Old Boats List-

I question most of my decisions since becoming her owner but I never question her design.

I cut all the bolts off and ground off the damaged glass.

The bulk of the work is well hidden in the anchor locker so there are no major cosmetic challenges.

Complete access to the whole area is pretty good. This weekend I will apply multiple layers of roving overlapped and spread well past the damaged area and hopefully I'll have it back together by Sunday night.

I will take lots of pictures (that's actually what I do for a living) and if the finished repair looks good then I will share them here. ;)

thanks
 

· Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Reaction score
1
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Just from the pics, I'd think about grinding the breaks back to solid glass to get rid of any splinters, delamination, or fuzz, grind a bevel, apply the fiberglass, then cut a plywood or aluminum triangle to spread the load as much as possible to the unbroken areas around it. Possibly some gussets tabbed in to transfer part of the load to the hull.
(plate on underside of roller mount dip, with bedded spacers beside to transfer the load to the deck)

Ken.
Done- i removed all the hardware, ground off all the loose glass, leaving just the thin shell that came out of the original mold. I filled in the cracks to hold it in place. Next I'll add glass underneath in multple layers and then drill new holes.

I would not be inclined to make a metal back. Like I said- the orginal design is presumed more than adequate so I'll just put a bit more glass than it had off the assembly line.

It'll make more sense when I put up some more photos.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
171 Posts
Reaction score
1
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Well I hope I didn't totally screw it up :)

I did it yesterday morning and it looks like i was pretty close to your suggestions.

I used roving, it seemed to have enough flex to conform to the odd shapes, I alternated seven layers, four wrapping upward around the 'box' and three wrapping forward to the adjacent hull.

Working upside down was difficult. I used West System SLOW hardener. The layers sagged slowly, I just kept my hands on it until it set a bit. After it hardened I tapped on it and there seems be one small void near the aft edge, the rest of it returns dense THUD- like oak,

It's a bit on the ugly side but I think it will do the job. (a lot like my welding)

thanks
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top