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One of None
Hunter 34
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8,665 Posts
Finish and finishing depends on, as most things; preparation. Teak is very open grained like mahogany and others. "filling" the grain is the only way to get a smooth finish. Grain fillers work but I've had mixed results with them. A sealer coat of finish then sanded with 220 or 320 and leaving the dust.. then wiping another sealer coat diagonally across the grain will get the dust into the grain after that dries and you sand again you may find the grain completely filled or do the same thing a couple of times. Any table top needs (imho) at least 6 coats rubbed (super fine sanded) between coats. Also, many people just don't wait long enough for varnish to harden. it can take days not hours. Polyurethane's are faster more clear then amber and dry quite hard. Note all the above is very difficult with stained woods because it's very easy to sand through the stain on the edges and corners.

Tack cloth, less the $5 = priceless! ALWAYS use before even thinking of finishing a horizontal surface!

Another big mistake we make, is thinking we can get a perfect gloss with a paint brush! NOT A CHANCE! After all the super fine sanding is done and a you have smooth with no grain or brush lines showing on the surface, you can wet sand or dry with finer and finer grits to 600. (Edges and corners are hard to do and not sand completely through the finish. ) Then for a glass like shine. rubbing compound can work wonders with a buffer, but you can do the buffing by hand on varnish or poly. Brush and spray are fine on all the lesser parts of a table top but a true "Piano like finish" needs allot of work.

 

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One of None
Hunter 34
Joined
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8,665 Posts
Ritchard it's beautiful! How's it holding up since the build? I've had mixed results gluing teak.
 
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