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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There was a fire at White's Hudson River Marina last night. A couple of boats near mine were destroyed. Mine got, at the least, some heat damage. Furler luff melted, nav lights melted, winter cover half burnt off, rub rail looks shot.

For all you experts out there ... could there be hidden damage from the heat? Insurance company will get a call but I want to go into this with a little knowledge under my belt!

http://i767.photobucket.com/albums/xx320/ronrelyea/IMG_0717.jpg[/IMG]ort=1&o=0
 

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Ron,

Just helping out with the images.. Sorry for your loss.

You will have a pretty big claim but I suspect any hot spots in the glass can be easily repaired. Matching the gelcoat, good luck with that...??

This is a PRIME example of why most marinas and yards have rules that specifically ban boats being left plugged in while on the hard. Up here many yards send guys out to yank the plugs out of the power posts..

I can almost guarantee the boat that burned had shore power connected and this was either an electric heater, overload of the Twist-Lock shore inlet socket or battery charger related...













 

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That's sad. I would get a surveyor to take a specific look. Stuff adds up quickly. Are you insured or will you need to pursue the other owner?

What started the fire?
 

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And a roof collapsed onto 20 boats last month? Doesn't seem like they are on their game there.
 

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WOW - Sorry for your loss.

I have to express Kudos to the marina and FD for putting the fire out as quickly as they did.

This reminds me of a marina where I kept my boat one winter. The boats were stacked in 6 tight rows from the parking lot to the waterfront. There is NO WAY that the FD could get themselves and equipment to put out a fire if the boat was in the 4th or 5th row. Something to think about...
 

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Yeah, some marinas are tight. I once saw a single bad jackstand take out over 20 boats.

I'd go for a place with some air between boats. I like room to work. Where I stay, 8' is tight. The price better be lower, because you are getting less.
 

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The boat that got the fire started was an '83 Hunter 31.
 

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Wow, sorry you had that happen. It has always amazed me that there seems to be so little attention paid to the danger of fire in storage yards. I always detach EVERYTHING, including batteries. The idea of leaving 100v. current attached to anything, unattended in storage, is nuts. With all the flammables, signaling devices (explosives), etc. on boats, you'd think there would be strict local fire department rules about boat storage.
 

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The boat that got the fire started was an '83 Hunter 31.
This boat has been for sale for three years at least. I looked at it but it had big issues with the support beam under the mast.

They don't allow shore power hookups on the hard there and I know where that boat was I don't think there are any outlets near by.

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Sorry to hear about this Ron.
This blows in the worst way. This is the time you would be getting your boat ready for launching. Instead you'll be dealing with insurance claims for some time.
My boat is just down river from you in Nyack, if you need a sailing fix.
 

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This is just me but...

I would not loose a sailing season over this. Get photos, get a surveyor, talk to the insurance guys... and then launch. If nothing other than the light is critical, go. Even if the furler is not functional, it is still a foil (should be able to hoist and drop easily). Inspect the stem head and forestay to make certain they are sound. It shouldn't be too hard for a close inspection to reveal the maximum temperature they saw.

Get a cash award and fix it next winter.

Of course, everything I said based upon there being no serious structural issues. There is some melted bumper and some gelcoat that may be damaged--I certainly can't tell from photos--but perhaps nothing that can't wait until a mid-summer break or fall. What is the value of a lost season? You can't ever get it back, you could have unforgettable experiences on the water, and insurance won't cover the living you loose it. Though I take good care of my boat and enjoy tinkering and perfecting, at the end of the day it is a tool for living.
 

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Ron I would say you are very lucky as I don't see any thing other then what you have described.

I would make sure to have a few qualified people look at it as I'm sure after Sandy the insurance company is going to try to low ball the cost.
 

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That really blows. I went through a similar experience although mine was in an indoor storage facility so there was a lot of smoke damage. I was several boats away from the one that caught fire so I thought I was fine. Just some cleanup and then launch I thought. It ended up being a lot more work and money than I imagined. Smoke gets everywhere and smoke from a fiberglass fire leaves soot that was hard to clean. The marina insisted they had to do the initial cleaning if it was done on their property because of the potential hazardous runnoff. The cleaning chemicals they used destroyed the finish of anything plastic on deck. What a mess. Needless to say I haven't been back to that marina. Work closely with your insurance company and take pictures of everything before you move stuff around. Hope you have less work than I did.
 

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Choose and hire your own independent surveyor rather than relying on the guy the insurance company sends (he works for them) and charge it back to them.

Pay special attention to the topsides nearest the heat source. Polyester is a plastic and the plasticizers that keep the laminate "plastic" can be gassed off from excess heat with little visible evidence, thereby weakening the laminate.

I almost always recommend a plug be pulled to ensure the laminate is sound in these circumstances. As you are going to have repairs in that area anyway, a plug won't make much difference to the work involved.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
update on the survey ....

Surveyor found some glass delamination on the starboard bow. With that repair, new furler, nav lights, anchor rhode, rub rail and insert, etc., the total came to about $6,400.

The claim remains open in case they find additional damage to the hull-deck joint after they take off the rub rail .....

THANKS EVERYONE for the kind words and advice! If anyone thinks of anything else, feel free to chime in!
 

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With additional financial exposure, they may start thinking about totaling the boat and selling off the hull. Probably not, if the claim stays as is. Not sure if that would be good or bad news for you, but be prepared.

So, what started the fire? Some of the insurance company's decision making could be a matter of whether they are the loss payer or if they can collect their damages via subrogation.
 
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