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Thanks Courtney.
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Discussion Starter #1
Any one have any real world experience with a Beneteau First 35 (mid 80's vintage)?

I'm looking seriously at one and curious if there's anything to look out for, or just general input.
 

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I don't know anything about the First 35 but if it's built like my First 42 you'll love it. Everything is pretty heavy duty and it sails great. I blow away a lot of newer boats with better ratings.
 

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I don't think Beneteau made a 'First 35' in the '80s.. There was a First 345, and later a First 35S5, quite different boats, but I can't find a 'First 35' per se.

I suspect you're thinking of the 345?
 

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Thanks Courtney.
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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Nope, it is a 1984 First 35. I'm not sure how many we're imported....?

They are very different from the 35s5. Similar to the First 305, but bigger.
 

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Old as Dirt!
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I don't think Beneteau made a 'First 35' in the '80s.. There was a First 345, and later a First 35S5, quite different boats, but I can't find a 'First 35' per se.

I suspect you're thinking of the 345?
Ah... Well... Actually, Beneteau began building First 35's in 1980. See 1980 Beneteau First 35 Boats For Sale
 

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Nope, it is a 1984 First 35. I'm not sure how many we're imported....?

They are very different from the 35s5. Similar to the First 305, but bigger.
ah... found one (or two) mostly in Europe if on YW... looks a lot like the 345, slatted cockpit seating, same era, must be very similar in all aspects.

Have had two friends with same vintage First 375.. both loved the boat.
 

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We looked at one in Seward that we loved. Almost bought it but sold before we made it happen. The aft cabin was tight but my wife and I (both 6' +) could squeeze in there. The cockpit layout was perfect. Never did get to sail it though.
 

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This model reminds me of my former First 30E. She was a lovely daysailer, but only had one cruise, then never again. Beneteau squeezed in bunks for seven, but not one large enough for someone 5'10" let alone for a couple. with five extra feet, maybe one bunk gets big enough, but when my wife and I looked at a First 345, we immediately tried the bunks, found them all unsatisfactory and got off.

If you check one out, be sure to get in bed with your SO.
 

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Thanks Courtney.
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Discussion Starter #10
I have found one and was able to climb into the V berth. It was plenty long enough for me (6' nothin), but didn't leave enough leg room for a second person. The 2 aft cabins seem quite a bit bigger but can't get a good feel for how large they are as the headliners are coming down (as these boats are prone to).
 

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I have found one and was able to climb into the V berth. It was plenty long enough for me (6' nothin), but didn't leave enough leg room for a second person. The 2 aft cabins seem quite a bit bigger but can't get a good feel for how large they are as the headliners are coming down (as these boats are prone to).
Those fabric headliners are a problem in a range of the Euro boats of that era, seems like...

We looked at a 30E as well, had the exact same impression as SF.. a 36 foot interior crammed into 30 feet. I'd have hoped by the time you got to 34/35 feet it would work again..
 

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I have found one and was able to climb into the V berth. It was plenty long enough for me (6' nothin), but didn't leave enough leg room for a second person. The 2 aft cabins seem quite a bit bigger but can't get a good feel for how large they are as the headliners are coming down (as these boats are prone to).
It is not surprising that after 30+ years the foam backing on the hull liner material has begun to fail. It is a common problem with boats of that era. Although it is a pain in the neck, it is not difficult to strip out the old lining and install, or have installed, one of the new non-woven hull lining materials. The most demanding aspect of the job is removing the old adhesive and scrubbing the glass clean to accept the new cement and fabric. The good news is that the newer materials are much improved and are easy to install and shape and will last quite a good while longer than the original. The material is also relatively inexpensive. Material and professional installation on a typical Beneteau quarter cabin with the work done in Florida is usually in the range of $500 or so with quite pleasing results. (This assumes an owner does his own clean-up and prep). I can't imagine it would be much more costly up north.

FWIW...
 

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Yea, I would not worry about the headliner, you have Gedaggett near by! He did a bang up job on SailChick's boat. I looked at a First 345 and really liked it. It was a tiller, and in good shape till I looked at the keel bolts. OUCH they were rusted really bad, and the thought of trying to get new bolts into a cast iron keel did not appeal, so I went no further. So check that. I liked it a lot, but it was the first Beneateau I saw, and was impressed.
 

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Do you know what this boat rates?

I came very, very close to buying a First 375:



Honestly, the biggest thing that turned me off was that stupid headliner. It's just such a silly thing to have to work so hard on.

I hope it works out for you. Cool boats.
 

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Thanks Courtney.
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Discussion Starter #17
Yeah, I agree. The only saving grace is that I raced on sailchick's boat all summer and saw that it can be fixed (and look good).

The First 35 has a phrf of 120
 
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