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Doing my first bottom job. Were doing it on a Ericson 35 Mk II

My question, is Sea hawk clorinated rubber primer what I should use?
Best bang for the buck? Pros and cons?
It'll have West marine anti foul over it.
 

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Please take this as my opinion ,because that's what it is . How ever I have owned my boat for over 20yrs. and I have painted the bottom 5 times . First when I have a blister I grind it in tell it is dry then I fill it with 3M Marine filler , Then I use Pettit SR Trinadad or the last time I did it I used Z Spar witch is a little harder and lasts a little longer . I do not use primer or barrier coat .
 

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Doing my first bottom job. Were doing it on a Ericson 35 Mk II

My question, is Sea hawk clorinated rubber primer what I should use?
Best bang for the buck? Pros and cons?
It'll have West marine anti foul over it.
Normally, you would just sand lightly and then apply new bottom paint. No primer. Have you read the instructions for the West Marine anti-foul? Theirs is the advice to follow.

The above assumes a sound, well-adhered substrate. If it is not sound, flaking off, or you have blisters, it gets a lot more complicated.

NB : Treat the stuff you are sanding as very nasty, because it is.

PS, given the effort involved, saving money on bottom paint is not the way to go. Have you asked locals what works best in your area?
 

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formerly 'BoatyardBoy'
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I'm in the process of redoing the bottom on my boat at our yard right now. I'm going back down to the gel coat so I can start fresh. I highly recommend a barrier coat type epoxy before the anti fouling paint due to the gel coat being able to absorb water. (absorb isn't the best word, but I just woke up and can't think of the word I need. Essentially the gel coat can get water under it, and could form small blisters, which aren't a big deal like the old fiberglass blisters)

If your starting fresh, I would definitely do a barrier coat. And if you can, after you sand down to the gel coat, let the boat sit for a few days to let any moisture come out of the hull before you put anything on it.

We use an ablative paint at our yards because it wears like soap and you don't have to strip the boat of hard paints like Trinidad every other year. But if you're doing it yourself, when you want to read apply it next time, you just need to pressure wash it then "sweep" the bottom with a orbital then paint. Though we will put anything anyone wants on their bottom if they don't want that. I'm personally putting epoxy and copper powder for a 10-15 year job. A guy who left in a 50ft steel sailboat did his boat before he left for a circumnavigation, so we have a lot of leftover copper powder.

We sprayed the bottom of the CNC 34 that I race on with balto-plate which is nice stuff but super pricey. It can be dang near wet sanded smooth for reducing friction if racing.

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The kind of "bottom job" you do depends on the current condition of the boat's bottom. If it is reasonably smooth, and has no blisters or peeling paint, then you probably only need to give it a light sanding and a fresh coat of paint. I usually do that myself on my 35' boat in a day or two.

If the bottom has large areas of roughness or peeling paint, then you should strip the bottom completely, apply a primer according to the manufacturer's instructions, and then apply antifouling paint.

If it has osmotic blisters, then you should strip the bottom completely, repair the blisters, cover it with a barrfier paint, and then apply antifouling paint.

The type of paint you use depends on how you intend to use the boat. Some antifouling paints work better in salt or fresh water, some work best for racing, some will continue to work well even if you haul the boat out for the winter and re-launch it in the spring, and others will not. Talk with your dealer about how you intend to use the boat, and seek his advice, or you can give us more details, and we'll offer our opinions.
 

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An old-time yard man taught me to wet-sand, using green 8" sanding disks from Westmarine, instead of using an electric sander. One of those disks lasts long enough to sand the bottom of a 35' boat. The water washes the sanding dust out of the grit, so the sandpaper doesn't load up like it does with a power sander. That means the sanding disk lasts much longer and cuts much better. Also, if you eliminate the electric sander, all you have to do is hold up the weight of your hand, instead of holding up the weight of the sanding machine plus the weight of your hand, so it isn't as tiring of the arm muscles. You don't have to worry about airborne toxic dust. It's messy, and it isn't a perfect method, but IMO it's better than using a power sander.

I haven't used a pole drywall sander, but think it's a good idea. I just crawl under the boat and let it drip on me. It isn't as bad as you might think, if you let the dripping subside before you crawl under there.
 

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I saw it done once ,( wetsand race bottom) . It was pretty cool , one guy had a dry wall pole and one guy had a hose . Both guys had on rain suites . The boat was about 30ft. When they were done it looked like glass . Besides good for racing , growth has a harder time sticking . Here I am hard at work preparing little o'l Patricia A for some hottley contested PHRF races . No really .
 

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formerly 'BoatyardBoy'
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Noone strips Trinidad every other year. The only reason to strip is if you are losing adhesion. My boat just had its first strip after 30 years of using Trinidad.
I just realized I put that, I mean every other job.. Unless you take considerable amount of paint off when you sand it before paint, then you will be adding unnecessary weight and thickness of paint on the bottom. But the paint last quite a few years so it's not that big of a deal.

Has anyone ever wet sanded a bottom with a hand/pole drywall sander? Any negatives?
We use an electric orbital sander with fine grit paper then, move to wet sanding with either a green brillo pad or if they want it more, wet sand paper super fine

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formerly 'BoatyardBoy'
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Nice Mark, I'm doing the same right now. Having one of our workers take it down. The boat hadn't been picked up for bottom job for at least 12 years.. So I'm going with a fresh bottom, gel coat up. I want to do some long distance races so I'll be trying to keep it smooth as well. Vehicle Naval architecture Boat


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Need to check with your yard as well. Stuff is very toxic.Due state or federal law they may not allow wet sanding unless effluvium is collected and properly disposed of. In our local yards you are allowed to dry sand but only with a vacuum attached to sander. Use finest grit you can as if paint good you do not want to get down to gel coat. When painting paint over leading edges and training edges first to permit extra coat inthese areas as they wear off first.At that time hand sand any bare spot edges to feather inand put extra coat there. It will fair in your bare spots. Save some paint to put where the jack stands where when boat is launched. Use chem suit, respirator and rubber gloves. when sanding. Use at least rubber gloves when painting. Stuff is bad for you. Best to scrap barnacles/slime off asap after boat comes out of water. That's when its easiest.
have fun.
I use the highest Cu content ablative I can afford and will put on two coats as we expect to go 24 months before next haul. Last months Practical Sailor reviewed brands.
 

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Hi Justified , to answer your question , thank you ... No we do not wet sand with Jack Daniels. We drink it with ice and water, but that is after 5o'clock . In the morning we like
Bloody Mary's , after lunch we drink beer , and then after 5 well you know . I'm not saying this is a good thing , no , it just seems to work for us . And yes thank you very much it does a real gud job of keeping us insane .
BoatyardBoy, nice pic of your cool boat . I hope your bottom job goes well ! so what races you talking about?
 

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formerly 'BoatyardBoy'
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BoatyardBoy, nice pic of your cool boat . I hope your bottom job goes well ! so what races you talking about?
Thanks, I'm hoping too! Your bottom looks good, nothing better than a boat with fresh paint!

Well, once everything has been shaken down and for the most part in working order. I'll probably start off doing Gulfport to Pensacola, then the Isla Mujeres race. Ever since I heard about that race I have wanted to do it but the boat I have been racing on is too small or not well equipped for the job.

After that, well any race I find out about and can get a crew for I'll do!

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Hi Justified , to answer your question , thank you ... No we do not wet sand with Jack Daniels. We drink it with ice and water, but that is after 5o'clock . In the morning we like
Bloody Mary's , after lunch we drink beer , and then after 5 well you know . I'm not saying this is a good thing , no , it just seems to work for us . And yes thank you very much it does a real gud job of keeping us insane .
BoatyardBoy, nice pic of your cool boat . I hope your bottom job goes well ! so what races you talking about?
I didn't know Eddie's had an outdoor bar.... LOL
 
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