SailNet Community banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

· Daniel - Norsea 27
Joined
·
1,255 Posts
Reaction score
533
My first thought was to post the link that scratchee already got to.

I used that post and did a bunch of research during the year after I did ASA101. I was living overseas so I couldn't rush into anything.

Try looking at different models of boats and you can see the comparison of how they're setup. If you start getting interested in certain make/model, maybe join an owners group, research, ask questions if needed, etc. Research isn't going to stop even after you buy a boat. If you're a DIY kind of person, then looking up how repairs are done will take up quite a bit of time as will doing the work itself.

I probably wouldn't get hung up on how much work it is to maintain a boat. Every boat has projects to do from basic maintenance to a complete refurbish. Just find the best one that fits your budget and the size you want. When I first saw my boat, I saw immediately that it will need a lot of work and it was in a big mess so I kept it on a trailer to work on a year and a half after I bought it, had it in a local lake for one year and now hauled back out and going through a refit to fix/upgrade/replace things as needed so it's setup the way I want. There's still a lot of work to do but it'll be worth it in the end.

There are plenty of boats. If something doesn't look right, don't be afraid to walk away. You could fall in love with one boat only to end up walking away and into one in an even better shape/condition. Take your time and hope it all works out for you.

Best of luck to you.

Daniel
 

· Daniel - Norsea 27
Joined
·
1,255 Posts
Reaction score
533
It all adds to the experience. Good luck with the search.

For my thoughts of your findings, I wonder if the engine turned, weather by the starter or by hand (not seized/frozen in place)

The pedestal movement might be suspect. Maybe not sealed right, water could have penetrated. If it's cored (wood in between the fiberglass) then there could be a source of rot causing the movement. This should be checked along with the rest of the deck for soft spots. I haven't done a core job but from what I've read, it's just a tedious job.

Like Caleb said, maybe just a rebuild kit is all it needs. Then it could be due to other problems. I've heard one of the worst jobs is to clean up after someone else's crap (pun intended). I never used my head when I got the boat and good thing. When I ripped it out because I wanted a composting anyway, there was a 3" hole on the holding tank that was hidden from any possible inspection. Installing a composting head may take some work, I actually drilled a hole in my cabin top for a vent but I planned it well ahead of time that I had no issues with the installation.

You'll want to see the bottom of the boat you'll buy. You could see how much growth there is in case you need to get rid of an ecosystem, lol. You could (hopefully) see if there's damage from either blisters or being run aground. If there's a keel joint (keel bolted to the boat) you'll want to see if there's issues there too.

I would take a closer look at the bilge too to make sure you don't have any oil/fuel leaks that will cause hefty fines later.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top