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Just have the engine fired up ready to power if you need it. Have enough scope out and ride it out. Doesn't last long.
Jim
 

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Otter
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I've been overnight before just not in a squall line at night, at anchor. I moved deeper into the cove. Since I have a swing keel and draw 12 inches with keel and rudder retracted I was able to get closer than the other boats.
 

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S/V Antares
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I'll second Jim's comment on the scope - scope is your friend in this situation.

For me, I couldn't help but 'stay up' just in case (and the show can be very impressive) but it does make the next day a long one!

Bill
 

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I've been overnight before just not in a squall line at night, at anchor. I moved deeper into the cove. Since I have a swing keel and draw 12 inches with keel and rudder retracted I was able to get closer than the other boats.
Why would you move into shallow water? When a storm is coming isnt it normal to move into deeper water?
 

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Master Mariner
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By bringing up your keel, you have lowered your stability drastically and you may heel much more in the gusts. By moving into shore, you may ground if the wind clocks around, which it can do in squalls.
Anchor chain does absolutely no good at all in the chain locker, so why not put it all out, if you are expecting nasty weather? Much more important in nasty weather on the hook than running your engine, is to have a second anchor ready to go. I'd much rather hear what's going on, than the rumbling of my engine, and with your rudder up it won't do you much good, anyway.
If you have proper anchor tackle on your #1, 65 to 70 knots without waves should be no problem, for a short time. But definitely make sure you can swing 360 degrees and I would suggest you drop your keel and rudder, though it may be too late now.
 

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Otter
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I moved in closer to stay inside the ketch of the cove as is about 40 feet ASL. Other boats around me I didn't trust. The boat was made to be " beachable " so I just took myself away from other boats into the more protected area of the cove. It's a water ballast boat and the keel doesn't do much for stability, just keeps her straight.
 

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Glad to hear it worked out but in my mind heading to such shallow water was a huge mistake that risks smashing your hull to pieces on the rocks if the wind turned to blow you towards the beach. I'd take no comfort the boat was designed to be beached with that coming. I'd also leave the keel down as it has to be more stable than in the up position but I'm not familiar with your boat.
 

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Otter
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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
It's an all sand bottom. The only reason I know this 100 percent is I did all the salvage operations after Sandy via mapping and walking the bottom and side scan sonar. Leaving the keel down at anchor gives in a nasty " keel slam " . If I wasn't familiar with the spot I would have stayed put.
 

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Glad it worked out. We had pretty bad wind damage in my neighborhood from that.
 
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