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not-so-old salt
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First - Thanks to everyone for the great info here on sailnet....

Well, the old girl finally came out of the water to get a bottom job. Sounds simple, yes? Just take down the mast, motor to the deep water ramp (2 hours), get on the trailer and take her to the shop where the local fiberglass Guru has his way with her. I'd planned on replacing the head and sanitation hoses while she was out of the water. I know it can be done in the water...but I'm a novice at most of this stuff.

simple...sure....right...

On the way to the deep water dock, the engine looses power and gets really loud. The guy motoring her down there shut off the engine and phoned for a tow about the same time a front moved through with 35 mph gusts. Nice. He tosses out an anchor and it doesn't hit bottom - hauls it back in, adds every bit of line on the boat to the rode and tries again. Gets it to stick before running into the rocks (we're on an inland lake). The powerboater arrives and gets her to the dock and on the trailer and to the shop without incident.

Inspection reveals the engine didn't overheat - all the coolant is still there. Impeller is good. Strainer is clean. Exhaust hose needs replaced, but is sound. Mixing elbow - not so much. It had basically disintegrated from corrosion. I was surprised as this is a lifetime freshwater boat, but after a few hours on google, I find this is a 'wear item' and can expect to replace them at least once every 10 years. This one made it 24 years - guess I got lucky. Lucky like Russian roulette. I don't have the tools to break the elbow off without risking damaging the threads, so I turn it over to a pro. $$$$Cha-Ching$$$$ This is where I was introduced to the wonders of marine grade parts. I had no idea reinforced exhaust hose was so expensive. Of course, I need 18 feet of it.

I got the head and hoses replaced and the smell is gone! That was no issue - the only surprise was having to pull the deck fitting for the pump out to get the hose on the barb.

Fast forward a week and the boat is back at the marina getting the mast stepped. My wife and I notice the bilge pump is cycling every 4 minutes. That's a bit much considering this is (was) a dry boat. I go below and tighten the strainer basket wing nuts to stop the leak. Yipppeeee! A ZERO cost fix and I look like I know what I'm doing in front of the Misssus.

Fast forward a few hours and we're back at the slip putting everything back on the boat and getting her cleaned up. We top off the fresh water tank and a few minutes later, the admiral notices the bilge problem returns. No problem! I know how to fix this. Nope. My previous 'fix' to the strainer is good. Takes an hour of climbing around the bilge to figure out the potable water hose from the tank to the pressure pump got dinged while dorking around with the exhaust hose. We empty the tank and call it a day.

Next day, I show up armed with bruises, cuts and a new length of hose from Home Depot. I replace the hose in 15 minutes - again - super rep points with the wife. Fill it up - and there's another lead...the thru hull to the tank worked loose - drain the tank, tighten the thru hull. Fill it up...DRY BOAT!

Now onto the fun parts. We reworked the mainsheet - took it out of the rope clutch and instead ran it through a shiny new triple block on the traveler, freeing up a clutch for the reef line now lead to the cockpit. I replaced the clutch while I was there - the old housing was cracked right around the axle and was ready to give up the ghost.

What a great experience. Prior to this, we'd not done much in the way of upgrades or work to the boat. Just replace some parts that were worn. In this case, we ran out of money before we ran out of inclination. :) And after watching the fiberglass guru work, I'm no longer afraid of the epoxy. I know he makes it look easy, but I'll start out small and in the bilge (I need to move the battery tray) and then maybe ... one day ... the top sides!

The admiral is now happy with the smell and we'll be spending more time at anchor when it warms up a bit.

Next up -
1. sand and treat the teak
2. replace all the portlights
3. get the traveler to work a bit easier
 

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Telstar 28
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Tony—

Doesn't matter if the boat is a saltwater or freshwater boat. Diesel exhaust usually contains sulfur oxides and that forms sulfuric acid when mixed with water... :)
 

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not-so-old salt
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156 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Diesel exhaust

Ahh! Once again - I learn something new. Thanks SD. I suppose I'll put this on my checklist for the next boat so I don't get 'lucky' again.

Doesn't matter if the boat is a saltwater or freshwater boat. Diesel exhaust usually contains sulfur oxides and that forms sulfuric acid when mixed with water... :)
 

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not-so-old salt
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156 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Little help...

HA! No problem. Going out this afternoon! 75 degrees, no clouds and 10 kts wind. Perfect conditions to make sure the rig stays up. :)

Let me help here:
...The admiral is now happy...

Next up -
1. sand and treat the teak
2. replace all the portlights
3. get the traveler to work a bit easier
4. GO SAILING! :)[/QUOTE]
 

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not-so-old salt
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156 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Some Photos

Before with ablative paint and rosettes.


After: with Petit paint (ablative was sanded off down to bare stuff and keel all purdy - (yes - I know there are three different hues of blue - Boot stripe is a future project)



In the water:


With name finally applied:
 

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What a great experience
That's the way to think! Do as much of your own work as possible and when unsure, ask questions! SailNet is awesome; I've been on the water for 41 years and a boat owner for 25 years, AND I STILL LEARN FROM SAILNETers!

Aside from saving a few $$$, the sense of satisfaction and security from knowing your boat intimately is priceless!

Keep us posted - you're hooked if you find mucking around in a bilge fun. :)
 

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Telstar 28
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992 Posts
Allan's got a good point... You should do something about that toe rail, which looks like it'd eat a dock line in a storm rather quickly.
 

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not-so-old salt
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156 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Pretty Boat?

Went for a sail yesterday and for the first time since we've owned the boat (11 months) - someone sailed by and said "What a pretty boat". That absolutely made our week! Gorgeous day - 72 degrees, no clouds, wind 10-15kts. The rigging only needs a minor tune on the lowers. My first experience on a newly painted bottom...what a difference!

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SD - Yeah -there's two areas on the toe rail that are troubling. The toerail has a smooth, rounded edge everywhere but the ends and only the aft gives me trouble with the dock line. The line in the photo is chewed from being around the cleat. The local West Marine went out of business and I got a bunch of dock lines ready to go - on the cheap.

Allan's got a good point... You should do something about that toe rail, which looks like it'd eat a dock line in a storm rather quickly.
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WinterRiver,
We bought the port lights about 6 months ago, but had to wait for the Texas heat to abate before attempting the replacement. We got the New Found Metals ports and I've read his instructions half a dozen times. They're printed off and in the box of port lights already! What a great resource for information. I'd like to hire that guy!

Make sure you read Maine Sail's detailed description of replacing portlights. One of his many wonderfully documented and photographed projects.
 

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not-so-old salt
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156 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
SD/Alan - upon further review by the replay official, I see the edge that y'all are talking about. Not the top edge, but the outer one. It's not caused any wear issues (yet) and it's blown 50 mph here since I've owned the boat.

I see it. I think I'll get some leather scraps and sew them onto the new dock lines for chafe protection since the dock lines stay on the dock and another set of lines are in the locker. Project added to the list ... gee thanks guys. :)
 

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SD/Alan - upon further review by the replay official, I see the edge that y'all are talking about. Not the top edge, but the outer one. It's not caused any wear issues (yet) and it's blown 50 mph here since I've owned the boat.

I see it. I think I'll get some leather scraps and sew them onto the new dock lines for chafe protection since the dock lines stay on the dock and another set of lines are in the locker. Project added to the list ... gee thanks guys. :)
Just curious, where is your boat?
 

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Telstar 28
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Tony-

I'd recommend using woven spectra/dyneema chafe guards, as one major cause of dock line failure is the nylon overheating and the heat causing the lines to fail. Leather, or plastic/rubber hose chafe guards prevent water from getting to the nylon and soaking it—which can cool and lubricate the line and prevent failure from internal friction heating.
 

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Retired and happy
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228 Posts
Austin, TX - Lake Travis.
Ah - been there, but not in a boat. Went to the restaurant on top of the cliff (can't remember its name) and drank wine and tequilas until the sun went down. Funny, but it looked a bit blurry......

Great place, great story about your boat. Many of us recognize the situation only too well! :D

Stuart
 

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not-so-old salt
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156 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Stuart,

You're talking about "The Oasis". It got struck by lightning (again) a few years back and is now completely rebuilt. Higher, bigger, and with an eye to safety. No more creaking decks! They still ring the bell at sunset and applaud mother nature.
 
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