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I rarely fish for fun/sport. When I fish it's for food. So I fish with heavy tackle that allows me to just reel the thing in without having to stop the boat and if I lose one, there'll be another along soon enough. This season I intend to mount a large reel directly to the radar arch and it will be more like a winch than a reel.

My son-in-law on the other hand is a passionate angler who runs a 40 foot sport fisher for primarily game fishing. When he started sailing with me he always brought a lot of tackle because "We're going boating, right? So we're going to fish!". He doesn't do that any more - he knows that when he hooks up to something worth catching, I'm not going to stop the boat for him and the extra 6 knots makes for difficult fishing and often costs him some of his gear.

So he still brings light tackle and goes off fishing in the dink while we're anchored and relaxing. He puts most fish back - I don't get the point.:)

Don't know if this helps - just sort of sketching what fishing off a sailing boat means to me.
 
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Helps if you know how to heave-to when you get a big fish on...I have brought two 150 lb marlin up to the transom to be released but you need to be almost stationary.

Off Panama City recently we got 24 fish in a 40 mile trip, they included 5 Spanish mackerel, a mahi mahi and a sailfish.

Good luck Phil
 

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Steve :

I guess it depends heavily on the species you want to catch.
On a long warm-water run, we had some success by trailing a lure behind the boat at about 6 knot, but only three species attacked the lure... Dorado (about 3 of them), one Bonito (that tasted like blotting paper), and a beautiful sailfish (returned alive). Fish are few when way offshore, we discovered.
In British coastal areas I have to stop the boat as the lighter tackle to catch British cold-water species just rides up to the surface if the boat is moving. The Atlantic Mackerel is one co-operative and very numerous species we have. It is a summer fish.
 
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