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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’m on an extremely tight budget, but still want my own boat to sail. I’ve found a project boat, which I think can fix myself. It’s a Flipper Scow, which as far as I can see is more of a lake boat.

The problem I have is that I don’t live by a lake, but by the sea. So I’ve got some doubts if it’s even worth considering this one – apart from the fact that it is pretty much the only thing within my price range I’ve found in months.

My research shows it should be really fast on flat water, can take two people, but can also be sailed as a single hander. As far as shape goes, it looks pretty much identical to a Topper. Only larger. And I see people sail those on the Solent all the time.

I live relatively close to Chichester harbour, which although it doesn’t have the smallest harbour entrance, waves aren’t usually too bad. If a Topper is a perfect learner boat for kids, this bigger similar looking boat might be perfect for me. Or am I missing some major difference in these two types of boats?

Would love to hear everyone else’s thoughts on this. Summer has passed, and colder weather is coming. So if this boat is going to see me mast down most of the time, it might not be worth it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply WGEwald, but my main concern/question is whether this design would be considered "seaworthy" if I stick to the harbour - or not.

It looks very similar to a Topper to me, but I don't know much (anything) about boats. Just started sailing 2 months ago... . Before that I never even looked at a boat.
 

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The Flipper was a big class in Denmark in the 70's and 80's.
It is a safe as any other 2 person dinghy. The special stern design was meant to make the boat sail over the waves instead of through them.
I would say it should be sailed on lakes or in realtively calm waters.

Later the ideas led to a whole series of double-ender sailboats in various sizes. They became very popular and are today considered as classics in Denmark.


I used to sail Flipper in my younger years. It was on a lake and it was great fun.
Again, it's not worse, nor better than any other dinghy of the same size, so for sailing in open waters most would recommend a keel boat I guess? :cool:
 

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I'm on an extremely tight budget, but still want my own boat to sail. I've found a project boat, which I think can fix myself. It's a Flipper Scow, which as far as I can see is more of a lake boat.

The problem I have is that I don't live by a lake, but by the sea. So I've got some doubts if it's even worth considering this one - apart from the fact that it is pretty much the only thing within my price range I've found in months.

My research shows it should be really fast on flat water, can take two people, but can also be sailed as a single hander. As far as shape goes, it looks pretty much identical to a Topper. Only larger. And I see people sail those on the Solent all the time.

I live relatively close to Chichester harbour, which although it doesn't have the smallest harbour entrance, waves aren't usually too bad. If a Topper is a perfect learner boat for kids, this bigger similar looking boat might be perfect for me. Or am I missing some major difference in these two types of boats?

Would love to hear everyone else's thoughts on this. Summer has passed, and colder weather is coming. So if this boat is going to see me mast down most of the time, it might not be worth it.
Not sure what ocean you are near but I would look around to see what others are sailing. While they may be a bit more daring than you, they likely are OK if they are still sailing, especially if an older boat. Thing is the "tight budget" and "Project boat" rarely go together well at all. Unless you want to spread it out over a long time.

Personally if the seas are even a bit rough I would look for a small keel boat. Only issue is most cannot be pulled out of the water. Some of the smaller Catalina's are trailer-able. Thing is a small keel boat in need of a bit of work will likely be the same price as a decent sized dingy or skow. Person Ensigns are cheap around me, like $500 needing work, or even have seen a few for free. (one free one was in very good shape but I don't have access to a trailer or tow vehicle) They are very stable, and there is a nice racing class.
 
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