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Another rather tired argument is in regards the 'making money off hauling and selling derelict boats, same as is done with cars.'

Yeah, that's not the way that works.

Hauling a derelict, especially if it's sunken, is quite expensive - we aren't talking about hooking a wrecker up to the boat and driving off. Craft for towing are specialized boats in and of themselves (have a look at a SeaTow boat sometime), and a sunken boat will need a barge and crane and probably a diver, someone's gotta pay for that.

If the owner isn't caring for the boat, he or she isn't about to pay yard fees. They'll just walk away. So then you have a POS taking up valuable boatyard space, so the yards are wanting their fees or else the boat outta there so they can put a paying customer's boat in the space.

There is NO market for POS boats, so the POS boat will just end up cut up and landfilled, further costing money.

So there it is: the derelict laws aren't enforced largely because it is far more expensive to enforce them than to leave the boats derelict. The authorities just hope that nobody complains 'cause they don't want to spend that kind of money to solve the problems...
Then we'll see more of these...

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shipwreck_Men
 

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Actually, at one time, Florida had a derelict boat removal program, which was the result of drug runners bringing in drugs, then just dumping the boat, kinda like the cost of doing business. When the drug runners were caught, those confiscated boats ended up as derelicts as well. Back about 30 years ago, Florida was stripping the engines and fuel tanks from these boats, loading them on barges and using them for their artificial reef program. You'll find a huge pile of them on the bottom on the Gulf of Mexico at the west end of the Northwest Channel out of Key West. There are several other similar locations in the deeper waters off Hawk Channel as well. When funds ran out for the reef program, the derelicts were no longer gathered and sunk.

I really doubt that a federal law or program is the answer - the feds seem to have a lousy record with most of the things they become involved in, especially in the natural world. If I had to pay another buck for my boat license to have the derelict boats turned into artificial reefs, I would gladly pay it. I would gladly pay another $5, which amounts to just $2.50 a year because we only register every two years in Maryland.

Most of the derelict boats in Maryland are usually at marinas and boat yards, sitting there rotting away and becoming eyesores. The boat yards and marinas usually got them because the owner(s) passed away and either the owner(s) had no living relatives, or the families just didn't want the boat. The facilities usually place a lien on the boat(s), then go through an arduous task of obtaining the titles and finally trying to get rid of them by holding an auction and selling them to the highest bidder. The boats that do not sell become a huge liability to the marina or boat yard. They usually end up stripping the hardware off the boat, then cutting them up with a chain saw and have the pieces hauled to a landfill in a dump truck. This is a very expensive proposition for the boat yard or marina, averaging more than $4,000 per boat just to get rid of something that is taking up valuable marina space.

Many years ago, I wrote a magazine article for Ira Black's Noreaster Magazine pertaining to this very subject. In researching the article I discovered that in Maryland alone there was an estimated 10,000 derelict boats. San Francisco Bay had a similar problem, but in their case, people would merely grind off all the serial numbers, then anchor the boat out in the bay and leave it. Some filled with rainwater and sunk, while others just became covered with bird droppings and eventually broke free of their moorings and drifted down the bay as navigation hazards or ran aground somewhere. One of the photos I submitted with the article showed more than 500 derelict sailboats and powerboats anchored at a single location near the SF Bay Bridge alone. Authorities there said the cost to get rid of each boat averaged more than $1,000, and they just removed the engines and put the boats through a crusher.

Unfortunately, we, in the USA, live in a throwaway, disposable world, one that insanely trashes our natural resources and our environment at every opportunity. Each day, as I drive along Route 222 from Conowingo Dam to my boat in Perryville, I'm constantly amazed at how individuals treat our planet. Every foot along both sides of the roadway is littered with plastic bottles, beer cans, plastic bags, fast food wrappers, old mattresses, old toilets, old tires, etc... I ask myself, why on earth would people do something like this to the world they live in and raise their children in? Then, as I cross Conowingo Dam, I see 20 acres of debris, which often includes 55-gallon plastic drums, pieces of floating dock, thousands of plastic bottles, and huge quantities of driftwood. Much of it will flow over the spillways of the dam and end up in the Chesapeake Bay. The water itself is a nasty color of greenish brown from a foul mixture of untreated, raw sewage and runoff from agricultural and developments from as far away as upstate New York. Ironically, people withdraw their drinking water from the Susquehanna River every day, treat it heavily with Chlorine and other chemicals to make it safe to drink, then return it to the river in the form of treated sewage. Just a few miles downriver, another municipality will withdraw the river's water and recycle it for their municipal purposes. Just think, if the good folks at Harrisburg didn't flush their toilets, Port Deposit, Havre de Grace and Perryville would not have any drinking water. Gives you that warm, fuzzy feeling, doesn't it.

No one should be surprised that Florida is doing what they are doing when it comes to boating. Unfortunately, the boating community has brought this on themselves - no one else can be blamed for the problem. Derelict boats come from derelict boaters - it's that simple.

Gary :cool:
 

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bell ringer
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No one should be surprised that Florida is doing what they are doing when it comes to boating. Unfortunately, the boating community has brought this on themselves - no one else can be blamed for the problem. Derelict boats come from derelict boaters - it's that simple.

Gary :cool:
That's the truth. The real mystery is why the State took away the local municipalities ability to govern the waters in their towns to start with.
 

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So MD has 10,000 derelict boats @ $4k to remove each, that's $40k. In .gov budgets that's a rounding error. If FL's problem was 10x that, it's not insurmountable at all. Remove one state trooper for 5 years from the budget and his salary would cover removal of 100,000 derelict boats.
 

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So does MD have only 10 derelict boats, or does it only cost $4.00 to remove each one, or does a state trooper make $80 million a year?:smile
 

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lol in pre-coffee math yes.

But even at 10x that, it's not an insurmountable issue.
I think you still need another cup. Your math was off by 1000x. :)

$40 million would be the cost in your example.
 

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bell ringer
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What does derelict boats have to do with the recent FL law? Far as I can tell nothing. Even in the older threads I don't really see how anchoring restrictions really have much to do with derelict boats. People abandoning their boats on anchor or a home made mooring probably care little about old laws let alone new ones.

The way I look at it FL has made it very hard for local towns to restrict anchoring. I feel they are PRO anchoring and boating and I don't understand how people talk about any new FL action as some evil govt out to screw boaters.
 

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The RV analogy is raised periodically. There are several differences. First and foremost is the history, captured in Federal law, of freedom of navigation. There is the precedent of free anchoring going back to the formation of our country. Just look at the issues of where property rights end (generally MHHW or the high-water mark).



There are many parts of the country where there is little choice. In my own stomping grounds Spa Creek and Back Creek in Annapolis are not wide enough to swing 200' clear from docks and shores. Similarly the upper reaches of the Magothy River, Granary Creek and Dividing Creek off the Wye, common anchorages along the tributaries to the Patuxent and Potomac Rivers, and much more.

In Florida the proposed restrictions would turn almost all of Southwest Florida into a no-anchoring zone. The shape of canals, lakes, and ponds really limits anchoring space.

Many other portions of the US and anchorages across the globe require being pretty close to shore, including the use of shore lines.
As it stands right now, the restrictions are limited to some predetermined areas where cruisers frequently anchor...sometimes for very long periods... but tis a matter of time before these areas start to grow..

Right now in Ft. Lauderdale there really is only one place you can anchor and only for limited periods...and that too will change Im sure..

After that, its the city run mooring field at $35 a day and limited moorings.

Or go to Miami and anchor in the middle of Biscayne Bay.
 

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No...its really just the "GOLDEN RULE"....The Guy with the most Gold Makes the Rule... thats what this really is about...
 
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