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Discussion Starter #1
A week ago I was reading a forum (forgot what) and it talked of several products to make flushing simple. It was a choice of products from about $100 to $300 that would make hooking a hose up and flushing your system each time you come into dock. Does this ring a bell with anyone as I cannot find the thread I was reading.
 

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Flushing salt water from what???
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks to bubb2, that is what I was looking for.

Sorry Sailing Dog, since I posted on the Diesel Engine part of the forum, I assumed you would know what I was talking about. Should have been more specific.
 

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I'm still not totally clear, but I think you are talking about flushing the raw water out of your engine. If so, you certainly don't need to spend $100-$300. I use a T that comes with a radiator flush system. I've installed the T in the raw water line, prior to the raw water strainer, with a simple hose valve which attachés to a short (8') garden hose. I put a 5 gallon bucket in the cockpit, run my dock water hose to it. I start a siphon in the short hose, hook it to the T, turn off the raw water intake, and open the little valve at the T. Presto, a fresh water cooled motor! Now...I've actually taken it to the extreme, by stopping at the guest dock as I enter the marina. I fill three 5 gallon buckets (instead of one with a dock hose supplying it). I have another little hose valve on the intake side of the short garden hose. I start the siphon and get back underway, using the buckets to supply the water (shutting the valve briefly when I transfer the hose to a new bucket). By the time I get to my slip, the motors douched and ready to shut down . The three buckets fit into each other and sit in my locker. You could use your galley sink instead of the buckets if it supplies enough water (mine doesn't). A little fanatical maybe, but raw water (and idling at the dock) is a terrible thing to do to a nice diesel! Anyway, the whole set up is probably $20. Originally I was hooking the dock hose directly to the T, but was advised against it (in this forum), as controlling the proper flow for the pump is impossible. The siphon allows the pump to control the water volume.
 

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L124C, It's just me, but plastic valves below the water line does not sound like a good idea to me, but it's your boat. You don't even have double hose clamps on the valve.
Well, if the water line fails anywhere while I'm on board, I'm going to shut the water off at the source which is the intake valve. If the line and the intake valve fail (very unlikely), I have bungs. If I'm not on the boat, the water is shut off at the source which is the intake valve. If the valve and the line fail (still, very unlikely), hopefully someone notices the boat's bilge discharge. If not, I'm one very unlikely guy and have insurance.:( On the other hand, If I take on water elsewhere in the boat while under way, this set up turns the motor into a bilge pump almost instantly (for what thats worth!). Without cutting hoses or undoing double hose clamps. I could get the valve in metal, but I don't think it's any safer. I will put double hose clamps on though (thanks).
 

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Once a year, instead of filling the buckets with fresh water, fill them with vinegar. Run the vinegar into the engine and let it sit. The vinegar is a VERY mild acid and will clean the heat exchanger. Then run a load of fresh water after a day or two to flush out the vinegar.
 
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