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A few years ago I removed the foam backed vinyl from the walls by the bunk in the bow. It was coming apart, with the vinyl drooping down and the partially disintegrated black foam getting everywhere.

The new foam backed vinyl I got today is a bit different, since it is a spongy, pinkish foam (like used in a cushion) instead of the black flaky foam the previous vinyl had.

1st question -- is there an issue at all with using this vinyl? The add on Ebay said "Sea Ray" in it, which doesn't help, I suppose.

Also it's 1/2 inch think instead of the roughly 1/4 inch that the old vinyl had.

2nd question -- what type of glue is best to use? The old glue was very good, as took a lot of work to get most of the now-powdery foam backing off the walls. I don't want a glue that I'm going to smell all summer when the boat is closed-up on a rainy day. What is best to use?

Thanks for any help with these questions.

Regards,
Brad
 

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I've been watching the Sailrite videos lately thinking about doing the same project. It doesn't sound like the same foam backed vinyl they use. In their projects they are using 3M Trim Adhesive which they are spraying on the material very all before installation. It looks like it gets tacky very quick and holds the material up easily and also allows you to move it around somewhat to get the right fit.
 

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Either a spray or brush on contact cement will work just fine. That is what I used when I redid ALL of my interior on my Jeanneau.

One thing I will suggest....if you have flat area's, or areas with deck fittings, try to put on a thin plywood with vinyl and velcro, or screw in.

Marty

Marty
 

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Brad,

Here is a link on the jeanneau-owners site of how I redid the aft cabin, at the bottom of that article, is a link to the head area. It might give you and idea or two on how you can do things different. Not saying how I did things is best, worst or otherwise.
Headlining Replacement

Marty
 

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The foam changes color over its life. F'rinstance, almost all of the cushion foam I've seen new is bluish or greenish, but it turns yellow as it ages.

but brother, if I were you, I'd think hard about not putting anything back in - if I could, I'd rip out all my stuff and paint the interior with some sort of hi-solids paint. YMMV.
 

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I did rip out my sagging headliner in the aft head and decided to paint it instead. Even after sanding a lot it still took probably 5 coats to get a decent paint job over there. Had I saved the original covering I would go back and make a template and use the foam backed vinyl he's talking about to redo the area. I'm thinking it would've taken a lot less time to do that than ask the painting I did.

Now I'm planning on using the foam backed vinyl in the aft cabin on places where there is no equipment mounted. Where there is I'll be using panels secured with Velcro most likely.
 

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Letrappes, I thought about painting mine, but the headliner was there for a reason. The underneath it is essentially raw fiberglass (no gelcoat covering). It is rough and looks funny. I was thinking of using epoxy to try to smooth it out, but given that it's overhead, I have yet to think of a good way to get the epoxy on in a smooth coat where it won't drip. That's why I was leaning toward some kind of covering for the ceiling instead. I was thinking of going with a smooth plastic panel held in place with Velcro.

Anyway, sorry to contribute to the thread drift here. To Bene's original question, I think SailRite recommends 3M Super 77 Spray Adhesive 16.75oz for use with their headliner (see Vinyl Headliner UV Protected Perforated with Foam Backing. and Installing a Foam Backed Headliner in a Boat Video).
 

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Letrappes, I thought about painting mine, but the headliner was there for a reason. The underneath it is essentially raw fiberglass (no gelcoat covering). It is rough and looks funny. I was thinking of using epoxy to try to smooth it out, but given that it's overhead, I have yet to think of a good way to get the epoxy on in a smooth coat where it won't drip. That's why I was leaning toward some kind of covering for the ceiling instead. I was thinking of going with a smooth plastic panel held in place with Velcro.

Anyway, sorry to contribute to the thread drift here. To Bene's original question, I think SailRite recommends 3M Super 77 Spray Adhesive 16.75oz for use with their headliner (see Vinyl Headliner UV Protected Perforated with Foam Backing. and Installing a Foam Backed Headliner in a Boat Video). However, I don't think that I would go back to a permanently installed liner except for a few places where the shapes are just too odd to try anything else.
 

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...
but brother, if I were you, I'd think hard about not putting anything back in - if I could, I'd rip out all my stuff and paint the interior with some sort of hi-solids paint. YMMV.
You know I have seen your "bunk in the bow" as you call your forward compartment. If I'm not mistaken I was the one who removed the old vinyl covering from the failed foam underneath.
I like the way Multihullgirl thinks - go with a good paint instead.
As always though, your boat, your choice, your money.

Fixing it up for Lucas this summer?
 

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Y'all, I'm not talking about going with some sort of thin paint. I specifically said 'high-solids' so I'm referring to something that would approximate a barrier coat. There are epoxies which would fit the bill, just look up 'high solids epoxy paint' and you'll get a list.
 

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The adhesive Sailrite uses in their videos is 3M Super Trim Adhesive. The 3M Super 77 seems to be used on sails in their videos.

I did use a high solids paint from Valspar I believe but the problem was the unfinished fiberglass it covered too way too much time to try to flatten and still didn't look great after many coats. I had no problem with the coverage. I think in the future I will just recover with new vinyl. I think it'll be a lot easier than all the prep needed for making rough fiberglass look nice.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I747 using Tapatalk
 

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Brad-
There's no telling what "foam" is, at the consumer level. Suppliers cheat manufacturers, real testing costs money, everyone wants cheap because ten years down the line, who remembers what they bought?
But most foam will dry out and get brittle as it ages, bargain foam most likely to go first. So you've got what you've got and the best you can do is really clean off the old stuff (scraper, solvent, heat gun, rabid gerbils, your choice) and use a good brand-name adhesive to apply the new stuff.

There are plenty of "contact" adhesives that will do the job. With or without solvents. Canned or spray. You can trowel on something like a "cove base adhesive" which is designed to attach plastic cove moldings around floors, and those are usually inexpensive and robust. But a two-part adhesive usually grabs and sets fastest, and troweling onto foam is a mess, so a spray adhesive is usually a much faster cleaner way to go. (Spraying in closed spaces, ventilation, protection, etc. not to be ignored.)

I'm a 3M fan. They make a number of "Sprayments" spray adhesives, and if you give them a call, they'll tell you which ones grab best to foam and fiberglass, or paint, or wood, and hold permanently under high temperatures on overheads, etc. (A hot deck can make the cheaper glues let go.)

The glue is not something to cheap out on. If not 3M, some other premium brand name.
 

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Jim,

Not sure I understand the question per say. THe wood slats are glued to the fiberglass, no mold/mildew that I can tell...... Then again, I do have a heater on in the winter and colder months, along with plenty of ventilation to keep that sort of thing to as minimum as I can.

Marty
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
You know I have seen your "bunk in the bow" as you call your forward compartment. If I'm not mistaken I was the one who removed the old vinyl covering from the failed foam underneath.
I like the way Multihullgirl thinks - go with a good paint instead.
As always though, your boat, your choice, your money.

Fixing it up for Lucas this summer?
Yes, you are like a secret weapon for getting ready to launch.

You might come out for a visit too. I'm surprised that having a boat in Montauk over the summer that we don't have more visitors.

Now that I'm fixing it up, I have to get rid of the huge coil of line that's stored in there: http://www.sailnet.com/forums/gear-maintenance/131930-what-do-450-1-line-ready-floats.html

Regards,
Brad
 
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