SailNet Community banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We are newbie sailors looking to buy our first boat. Before paying for a surveyor we wanted to see if anyone can suggest how difficult a problem this may be. This is on a Hunter 380 2001 that in one of the cabins the foam insulation is peeling off the hull and there is mold underneath. Is this a common problem of this age boat? Is the problem simple enough as ripping out the foam and regluing new foam? Should we be more concerned as to where the water came from- i.e. hull/deck joint? Thanks for any advice!
 

Attachments

·
Bombay Explorer 44
Joined
·
3,619 Posts
It is difficult to see from your pic but if it is a vinyl fabric with a thin foam backing that is degrading this is indeed a common problem.

Cosmetic as it does not interfere with seaworthiness.

Fix involves removing all the fabric as all the foam backing will be failing. If you find a good way of removing the adhesive residue let me know.

Then replace with same?
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,485 Posts
The moisture could well be simply due to the failing insulation and resulting condensation against the (uncored) hull skin.

As mentioned, a common failing and not restricted to Hunter. The spider crack appearance seems a but unusual to me..
 
  • Like
Reactions: jimgo

·
Registered
Joined
·
233 Posts
A heat gun might allow a scraper or wide putty knife to remove it.

I have used a thick paint remover as well, but clean it off and water wash as quickly as possible.

I found a closed cell sheet foam for a replacement, but I've not seen it for sale recently. Maybe Sailrite has an option.

Regardless, I had best success gluing with a water based contact cement made by 3M. Fumes from the other stuff were nasty, and slightly dissolved the material I used until I found the water based stuff. Cost double, but went twice as far.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,073 Posts
I replaced the liner and "insulation" in one of my quarter births last year. The Admiral has reminded me that I need to do the other before the season starts. 5 below tonight. Not worried. Anyway, I used 1/2" foam carpet backing designed for damp locations and adhered it to the hull with water-based carpet adhesive. Once it cured I adhered a light beige exterior carpet to that. I used the wick'd thin stuff that HAS to be glued down so it would conform easily the gentle curves on my hull. The result is quite remarkable and very inexpensive; a combination that I admire in a project. Since it's in a wear area (sliding gear and body parts, in and out) I figure the carpet is ideal. So far it's been dry and if it does get wet, no big deal. Keep in mind that mine is a 39 year old trailerable and there will never be a survey required.

Don
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top