SailNet Community banner

1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
.
Joined
·
1,000 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Freinds,

Recentely I was at the Chicago Boat Show with a few friends from here..

And as I mentioned in a previous thread (SEE HERE), I do like the boats.

They are well built, a little cheap on the fixture materials inside, and flooring, and a few oher things, but overall are very good sailers, and excellent boats for casual coastal, and with some modifications, even some bad ass racing. The look alie racing sales gimmick torpedo keel must go..sorry.

However, one of the problems I have more trouble in passing, and explaining people, is what I think of the boat, ONCE IN THE WATER...I treid to show that to Tim and Jim at the boat show, but they could not see it and I could not explain it..so I use a photo instead.

It's hard to see in the brochures, videos, or when the boat's are on display...but look now, once in the water.

What I am talking about is how ugly the transition from cabin to coamings is, making the boat look absolutely out of balance, "nose heavy" and chuby.

This oat in the photo is the 37, but they are very similar in the cabin cockpit architecture, as they share the idea.




Tim and Jim..do you see what I tried to explain???

Look at the height on the boom, and the steering pedestal, the boat looks like a center cockpit...guess having room inside is possibe, at the exchange of a one damn ugly deck...

sorry

The boat is good, just looks weird

Alex
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,192 Posts
Alex, I see what you mean. Not the sweetest lines.
But I wonder, how does the height of the boom affect the sailing abilities?
When the boat is heeling and under sail, the boat might take a better picture too.;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,491 Posts
It's like a Hunter crossed with a Grampian 26 (very "old shoe" Canadian boat of the 1970s). Ew. (English expression of disgust.)

The Hanse boats: I have seen a few now, and all I can say is they bug me the least of the less expensive production boats. This is not a recommendation, and I'm sure they are great for "casual coastal" sailing, as Alex puts it, but I don't like their looks much and the build quality isn't as good as some of the worthy ideas inside the boats.

I have toured this 37 and the Hanse 400, I believe. I preferred the 400 and the price was good, but I wouldn't take it offshore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,647 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,296 Posts
That one does look weird! That bimini enclosure holder seems to be the issue, along with the rounded stepped down cabin.

Otherwise, spouse like those boats too. probably a 34-37' version of some sort.

Marty
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,491 Posts
Don't think anybody ever suggested it to be an offshore boat.

Alex stated they would make a good Costal Cruisers,
And I concur. But the salesman kept going on about the "Lloyd's 'A' Ocean Rating" or some such, so the company is suggesting they are appropriate for offshore.

Either that or the Lloyd's Rating system has become meaningless. There's a separate EU rating system also based on letter values. Neither is particularly familiar to attendees of the Toronto Boat Show.

Or the salesman was lying. I wasn't listening closely. I haven't found that's a good idea among boat salespeople.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,491 Posts
Don't let Peter from HMP here you say that. He won't let you in the locked doors!
Peter has a custom-built CS 36 with vast amounts of lay-up in the hull. It is very possibly heavier built than my steel boat on a per square foot basis...I am unlikely to object to Peter's boat, as it contains a large number of beers and spirits I have enjoyed in the man's company...:D

And I like Grampians, although I prefer the rarer 2-34 model. Oh, I see...you mean they once owned a Grampian? OK. I get it.

I was actually referring to the style of the coachhouse front. See? Looks like a baby's forehead and makes for a short foredeck.

 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Top