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Discussion Starter #1
Hello
I’m seeking for a good offshore vessel, capable of crossing the Atlantic, I really like Formosa 41’ ketch she seams to be a beautiful boat, but I know little about her seaworthiness, I could really use an advice.
Thank you
 

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Feroni,
I guess I can't speak to the Formosa 41 exactly, but I had an Island Trader 41. Both William Garden ketches off the same plans. THe builders in the Far East all used the same plans to make many brands. Don't know what year you are looking at, but I'd say the closer to the mid 70's the better. These were strong built boats that can take a lot of serious beating. THe hulls are extremely thick in the best places. In the thinnest point in my hull, to install a transducer I found 3/4" thick solid fiberglass. No core. My ketch sailed very well in big swells and was a comfortable ride for me and the ship's cat. THe living space was big (I am 6'3", 230) and had a nice shower. It was fun to sail. at about 16+ tons, you won't be winning any races, but racing sailboats is silly anyway. At a rough anchorage, she was always comfortable when the others were moving in the middle of the night to find a smoother ride. She carried a lot of fuel, water, and provisions.
So, if you can do without all that "High Tech" BS that finds it's way onto a boat these days. And you like a traditional looking and acting sailboat, I'd say she be fine for long distance cruising without having to be a footballer or TV Chef to afford one.
Cheers, paul
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi
I know that Formosa and CT catches are almost the same if not identical, I like this boats exectly for their traditional look, I look at those plastic boats build nowadays and to tell you the truce they make me sick. I agree with you about racing, it is foolish, I want to cruise and enjoy myself wile doing it.
There are many Formosa’s and CT’s on yachtworld, and they are well equipped for their price, you see, I come from Rep. of Georgia which is on the Black Sea coast, So my plan is to fly to east coast of America buy one of this boats and sail my way back home, I know it sounds like a crazy plan, but boats are more expansive in Europe, so I decided to buy in US.
I am not a very experienced sailor myself but I plan to hire a skipper who will help me with the voyage, only thing is that I have now idea how much will it cost to hire a skipper.
Do you have any idea about the skipper prices? its about 6000 mile voyage :)
 

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moderate?
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Suggest you read here:
http://www.sailnet.com/forums/buying-boat/11115-ct-41-a.html#post48037

My own view is that many of these boats have huge problems waiting for a new buyer to fix them. To plan to find one in good shape and quickly sail back to Europe is unlikely in my opinion. There is a reason they are priced so cheaply however pretty they look.
The cheapest way and safest way to get a boat back to Europe is to ship it on Dockwise or similar freight service.
 

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Grasshopper
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I've read that some years of these boats had hollow wooden masts and wooden spars that could be a problem, and that many had problems with the teak deckings. I was attracted to these boats at one time.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I read the link you gave me, to listen to those guys none of these boats are worth buying, so what should a guy like me should do if he likes an old stile boats and comfortable ones, also seaworthy? Do you guys have any ideas what make should I buy?
 

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I'm no expert, but if you like that type of boat, you might want to look at Hans Christian or Tayana.
 

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You are trying to buy a "salty looking", blue water capable boat, in good condition, for a really cheap price. While there are plenty of salty looking boats that are blue water capable...good condition and cheap price don't go together.
See the blue water boat list sticky thread here:
http://www.sailnet.com/forums/buyin...fshore-cruising-boat-list-january-2008-a.html
Post #'s 6&8 should give you a fairly complete list of ocean going boats.
Find some in your size range and take a look on yachtworld.com to see what appeals to you and what can be had within your budget.
 

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formosa sailboat plans

does any one have rigging chart for the woodenor plans....do not have the original mast and mizzen but need specs....thanks mike
 

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Dirt Free
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Formosa 41 -Teak decks = rotten plywood deck core, Chainplates of very low quality "stainless" steel invariably corroded. No structural support under the mizzen mast on the ones I have seen (I can't believe they are all like that). Mainmast sits on a block of lumber apparently thrown in the keel sump. Very inconsistently built, no two are the same.
 

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I seem to recall that I saw somewhere that the Formosa yard was about the lowest quality of the Taiwan yards in that era.
 

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Aspiring to be a Mexican
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Last year, shortly after I decided to by another cruising boat I thought that the Formosa/CT/Mariner/Sea Wolf/ I can't think of them all type of a cool piratey looking boat was for me. I studied and studied and later decided that it was not for me. The killer wasn't the rotting cabins, it was the fact that they just don't move in light wind. The second strike is that there just isn't one with 2 nice cabins to suit a family. They also have a fairly deep draft, not much of a problem in the Pacific but a real problem in the Caribbean.
 

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"They also have a fairly deep draft, not much of a problem in the Pacific but a real problem in the Caribbean."

IMHO other than the Bahamas and possibly the Turks and Caicos deep draft is NOT a problem in the Caribbean.
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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Au Contraire, $80,000 USD is a very high asking price for one of these.

Jeff
 

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We own a Mariner 40, while very simialar in design to the Formosas and CTs, etc, however, there are some differences. Mariners were built in Japan not Taiwan, there were only 95 built in the Japaneese yard. They are narrower of beam and therefore not as much room below. We draw 5.5 feet but were able to come down the ICW from CT to FL in the Winter, ( Yes we kissed the bottom a few times) She handled many Gales at anchor with ease and when off NJ handled those seas nicely as well. We also have Wood Spars, in fact we had them surveyed before leaving on our trip, with the exception of one small area they were ingood shape after almost 40 years, we did have new speaders made. Both the main and mizzen are more than adaquatly supported. She sails ok, does not go to weather as good as some, but sailboats in general are a series of trade offs. Not to BS anyone, the wood topsides is a constant vigal, but nothing major, at least not yet. We think the Mariner 40 is a beatiful boat.
 

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TaiWan Turkeys=not accurate

Looking at Formosas of any vintage can be confusing.No two are built alike is accurate..but,for the most part anything problematic will have been addressed by an Owner..and cured-correctly-one would hope.
Price does not always dictate the condition of the boat-especially in the current market..and,especially on the East coast of the U.S. right now.Boats are cheap and cash rules.
My advice is this-find a boat you like and is priced in your budget then SURVEY-SURVEY-SURVEY. Find a Surveyor that is familiar with the Formosa brand and knows the shortcomings of these boats.
as to the Formosa 41 and its siblings-these boats-and i mean alot of them-have crossed big water..big-bad water and lived to tell the tale.
I ve owned one-been thru every locker and hole on it...is it perfect??...no.
Have i ever found a perfect boat??...no.
tho I hear they do build one...someplace.
and,as a side note-William Garden is given credit for the Formosa designs-copied ad infinitum-but according to him,its not his..just some Bastardized-copied design from someplace that looked like something he did so they put his name on it. Just a tidbit for your scrapbook.
Fair Winds, david-Kemah Texas :rolleyes: :rolleyes:
 

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I would look for one that does not have the original wooden masts, original over sized rigging, and is absolutely able of passing survey. They have a lot of space, some have great teak carvings, and some have been around the world several times.
 

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snake charmer, cat herder
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i8 love my formosa yankee clipper. i had wanted sea tiger but that wasnt to be. i got this boat for really good price and found many bad spots. as i started to dig into them, i found the spots were not as bad as originally thought. if you like the look of a boat, dont let anyone talk you out if it--it is fixable. i am so glad i stuck to my guns and did this-- i hope you did as well. the leaky teaky yacht club group on yahoo groups is an excellent resource. smoooth sailing.
donot pay more htan 30k for a decent condition one of these--and fix it to be worth double!!!
there is one of these--a sea tiger-- sailing baja haha this yr--just motored by me--- these good old boats are awesome---- just do it and fix it and is gonna be fine! they can and will go anywhere. yes are deep--but is all good.
if there is 7 ft water in a place in low tide--we can do it!!!!

these boats look sooo goood with a bone in their teeth-- IMPRESSIVE!!!!!!

a benefit to having wood box masts--they are EASILY repairable and a lot less costly than you would imagine!!!! they also dont rot easily and they donot corrode. they are sitka spruce.



oops i see is a very old thread--i hope ye found yer formosa.
 
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