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arrgh!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just read "A Sail of Two Idiots" a howto book written by Renee Petrillo about what she learned on a catamaran. In the boat she and her husband both crew on monohulls, but say they prefer catamaran.

Hopefully I am not starting a war... but I am wondering if there are people sailed one than the other AND decided to go back?
 

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I grew up on monohulls, have recently (2006) switched to multi's, and still own a mono. In large part the current boat was driven by what slip I could get at the marina. Had I been able to slip it instead of the Beneteau I would own a cat, possibly a tri.
 

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I have sailed and raced on both. for me and for where I sail I would like a CAT. but since I don't have an unlimited budget I sail a small CAT and bigger mono. CATs are 4 times more money to buy. much harder to find dock space and it is a lot more expensive when you find a space. haul outs cost much more and there are two bottoms to paint. and did I mention they just cost a lot more
 

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Dragging anchor is usually about decision and technique fails - wrong place, wrong set, wrong anchor for the situation - unless conditions were beyond those forecast or reasonably expected. I'm sure some of the newer cats represent a lot of windage vs the average mono, esp when they add the tall enclosures and houses, and may require more diligence on the hook.

FWIW we have friends that were avid multi sailors/racers.. when it came to cruising they found that, doublehanded, they spent more time trying to slow down their F25C than otherwise. When it came to choosing a boat to island hop the Caribbean they chose a mono, though a rather untypical one (for island cruising), a Bene 36.7. Currently on their 10th winter of exhilarating sailing down there.
 
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I own a mono, but have chartered several cats. The mono is more fun to sail. But if I were going to live aboard for any length of time, I would choose a cat.

As others mentioned, a cat may be more demanding on your ground tackle--so upsize it. I've heard it said a cat has the accommodations of a mono half again it's length. That's a double edged sword, as it has most of the downsides of a mono half again it's length. (Except for draft)

I also read that book recently. I'm glad I didn't read it before getting some cruising experience--it might have put me off of cruising completely.
 

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the people from whom I bought my cat were looking to replace with a monohull. I believe they were wanting the mono for width reasons (narrow canal)
 

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Moody 46
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First some background. I just sold my Lagoon 440 cat in Australia two weeks ago. Owned it for 2.5 years and sailed from BVI up and down Caribbean, then South and Central Am., then on across the Pacific. Before that I had a Moody 46 mono and sailed that some 28,000nm with two Atlantic crossings.
First any cost difference has too many variables to make a blanket statement. An Oyster 46 mono same year costs more than say a Leopard 46 cat. A Lagoon 440 cost more than same year Beneteau 44 mono.etc etc.

Now, mono vs cat.
Answer is....it depends. First where are you going to sail? If for example your primary cruising ground is Bahama, then cat flat out. Shallow draft, fantastic at anchor (no roll), and more living room. Pacific, well cats are gaining popularity but I would prefer a mono. I hate the motion of the cat at sea and the passages in the Pacific are long. Also the Med., marina's are crowded and very expensive and cats are often charged 2x w can (often) mean about $250-300/day usd.

Performance. A performance cat like a Catana or Gunboat will significantly outperform most cruising mono's including high performance cruising mono's, including to windward (VMG will be better on the fast cat). BUT, a cruising cat like Lagoon, Leopard, F-P will often be outperformed by a performance cruising mono (like a Beneteau First series mono as example), especially going to weather and/or in light wind.

Bottom line I could go on and on about pros and cons but there is no right answer just as there is no answer to "what is the perfect cruising boat?".
 

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arrgh!
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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Orthomartin, thanks

I'm not looking to buy one or another.. it's just after reading the book there seemed to be a lot of benefits to a Multi-hull, but the purchase was expensive. Plus there were lots and lots of repairs... but I figure that could happen on any number of hulls.

For me it is a case that I read a book and it opened my eyes to something I had never considered before... and really raised more questions ...

Like one thing I have learned in the last year... the bigger the boat, the bigger the expense. Not just purchase but maintenance.. with more to repair....

Thanks

PS/EDIT: I am guessing with the coverage of the most recent America's Cup... people will be thinking multihulls

 

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Moody 46
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I did not see a big difference in maintenance/cost between my Moody and the Lagoon. What I really liked about the cat was...

Two motors and more important two rudders! (I had two autopilots, one on each)
Fantastic for socializing
Stable at anchor. This is huge!!
On the Lagoon, in foul wx I could (and did) stay in the saloon day and night with great vis and always warm and dry.
Having guests. Can't beat it for this.
Ease of movement fore and aft. No clutter
Flying Parasailor downwind much easier than on the mono
 

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arrgh!
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Most of that was clear in the book, but for the anchoring... it was stable, but they had trouble finding secure anchorage.......

Two motors go as a back up, but also another thing to go wrong

Another thing --- she mentions and people need to think about --- how do you plan to use your boat? Like you have pointed out, entertaining, a cat; Pacific crossing, probably monohull
 

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Moody 46
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Anchoring is no factor really. The reason some cats suffer is they use undersized rode and anchor to save wt. That is a mistake on a cruising cat as the cat generally has more windage so you can't skimp on gear.
On my Lagoon I had a 66lb Spade (great anchor) and 12mm chain (220ft with another 50ft rode).
Been so long since I have had regular internet it's fun discussing these things!!
 

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Having just made the move from a 35' mono to a 35' cat I can share my reasons. Shallow draft and livability. Also every family member said go for it, take a hit for the team. Space aboard and the flat sailing and anchoring for us older ones and the kids add up to more safety and enjoyment. That said yes, a mono is still more fun to sail, for me anyway.
 

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Good synopsis, ortho... like so many issues here, the answer seems to frequently be 'it depends'...
 
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arrgh!
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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Sounds like the biggest 'Depends' (besides my diaper) is how you want to use the boat... well and your banking statement. The more you want to entertain and do excursions, the more a multi- unless of course you can't afford to pay dockage.

And my main question -- would you go back --- sounds like most people would go back and forth and not deem one better.
tanx
 

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arrgh!
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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
I own a mono, but have chartered several cats. The mono is more fun to sail. But if I were going to live aboard for any length of time, I would choose a cat.

As others mentioned, a cat may be more demanding on your ground tackle--so upsize it. I've heard it said a cat has the accommodations of a mono half again it's length. That's a double edged sword, as it has most of the downsides of a mono half again it's length. (Except for draft)

I also read that book recently. I'm glad I didn't read it before getting some cruising experience--it might have put me off of cruising completely.
In the end of the books she says as much -- wondering if she should have kept her blog private...maybe until she sold the boat.

edit: And I will add there is a part in the book where the husband disregards agreed upon protocol of using a life line if going forward on the boat during a night sail, and waking the crew....

I have a fear of falling off the boat and watching it sail away.... I have a fear of this with a 12 foot boat during the day... and the thought of cruising and it happening... is pretty tough
 

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I went from a 65' gaff ketch built in 1909 to a Brown Searunner 37' tri, while circumnavigating.
I found the Searunner to be the ultimate cruising vessel if you are willing to abide by the rules of a real sailing multihull. A multihull that will sail must be kept light. No SCUBA tanks, excessive spares, air conditioning or even what a monohull sailor would consider a reasonable amount of fresh water.
If not, then you have two choices; travel with at least one engine on at almost all times or get a monohull. Most of the room-a rans here in he West Indies do not sail between the islands; if they are honest with you, they motorsail at best. If you want all the mod-cons, SCUBA tanks and a zillion gallons of fuel, AND sail, then you're going to need a monohull.
It all comes down to what you want from your boat.
 

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A year after buying the trimaran, I am pretty sure I would seriously consider one if I was heading back out. Sure you give up some accommodation space, but the extra room on deck more than makes up for it. And the fun of sailing a high performance tri is hard to describe.
 
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