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Discussion Starter #1
Hello,

I am replacing some of the interior paneling (currently a 1/8 in thick painted wood paneling covering the fiberglass in the salon and v-berth ceiling) in my boat.

When I was looking for replacement paneling, I found that home depot sells some white FRP panels, which would likely be more durable than the painted wood panels they replaced (and appear to resist mildew, not need painting, etc).


My questions are:
1.) Does anyone have experience with using interior FRP paneling in a boat?
2.) Where an adhesive is needed, is there a better option than 3m 5200? (which claims to bond everything but Polyethelene and Polypropolene pretty well -- which means it should do FRP paneling just fine, right??)

Thanks,

--
Joe
 

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Bender of Nails
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5200 is great for a glass to glass adhesive, so long as you're looking for a permanent bond (same goes for Sikaflex)d. If you want to be able to remove the liner contact cement, silicone caulk, or heavy duty velcro might be a better option.

I haven't seen those FRP panels, but I don't have a big store anywhere near me. I assume they're the gelcoat and mat/resin panels for tub surrounds ?
EDIT: simultaneous post...

Do you feel confident enough to lay up your own panels ? Flat panels are pretty straightforward.
 

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midlife crisis member
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I have seen that stuff. The PO of my 16' dingy used it for the floor of the cockpit (glued over the existing floor). I see no reason it would not work in a boat for the ceiling. I wouldn't use 5200 unless you NEVER want to remove it.
 

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I plan on using this type of panel inside my freezer after adding extra insulation.

But for the interior of the salon? Gloss white? Why not Formica? Pretty common on the 'herschoff' designed interiors. You can have only about a thousand colors to choose from, most with satin finish.
 

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I used some of that paneling a couple of years ago to replace the locker tops and backs in the galley (the thin teak veneer had been water damaged over the years and needed replacement).

It was easy to work with, looks really good, brightened up the lockers, and seems to work just fine.

Bill
 

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Telstar 28
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I wouldn't use 5200. I would highly recommend adding furring strips to the boat's interior and using screws to hold the FRP panels in place.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Do you feel confident enough to lay up your own panels ? Flat panels are pretty straightforward.
No - I really didn't want to do it myself, because of time and space concerns. Thats why the FRP home depot was selling was attractive.

I am only using white for the ceiling to reflect more light and keep the boat from being dark. The walls and bulkheads are going to be painted.

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Joe
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I wouldn't use 5200. I would highly recommend adding furring strips to the boat's interior and using screws to hold the FRP panels in place.
By furring strip, do you mean epoxying a strip of board to the boat to screw the panels into?
 

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Was starting to get the idea that I was the only one who was willing to use 'non-marine' products!

I've actually used that stuff as non-skid, held up very well. They make several different types of those panels, from a very aggressive diamond pattern to a smoother pebble finish than shown in the link.

On a recore, I layed several layers of cloth, then scuffed the bottom of the panel and cut it out to the shape I wanted the non-skid to be then bonded it with resin, I used thickened epoxy aroung the edge to make a smooth transition.

Need to recore a couple sections of the deck on my Ariel, debating that again, or another off-the-wall idea I have.

It IS fiberglass, so any way you would normally bond glass will work. It curves easily, but does NOT make compound curves.

Ken.
 

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If you do not want the high gloss finish - do a wet sand on the surface with a high grit and spray a matte or flat enamel finish over it. Or, spray the surface with a light covering of the "Frosted Glass" spray in a can. Either will take care of the high gloss without having to prime and paint them....
 

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At $55 a pop, it seems pretty pricey to me, and difficult to install. Plywood would be MUCH cheaper, even if you have to paint it, and will hold up (at least it has on our boat) for about 25 years. Another option, if it's just for headliner: why not use some sort of cloth, and staple or glue it. K.I.S.S.
 

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the panels at home depot are about 30 bucks by me, i wind up using them alot doing house renovations. i dont think they would be much use on a boat, as the surface texture makes them kind of hard to clean. i would not use them in an ice box, because of cleaning reasons. for the inside of cabinets they might be fine. for a head liner i dont think they would do to well, because as stated they wont do compound curves. i would think cedar tongue and grove planks would do better, just paint them once they are in, to brighten up the saloon some
 

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Frp

I built a commercial walk in cooler out of the stuff in 1995. in 2007 I sold the place and the cooler was still intact and in great shape. I used regular liquid nails in a tube to glue it to the OSB panels. I would use 4200 or life caulk if I was using it in a boat. The hardest part would be getting it to stay in place while the adhesive dries. they do make a plastic rivet to hold it down. but it makes cleaning it a little harder. Other than that, It cleans super easy with any soap and water and will last a long time. It would be great in the head/ shower combination. Clean-up would be a snap. Wipe and go.

Dave
 

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scottyt
I think we may be looking at differetn panels. The ones I saw at Lowes were a soft pebble on one side and smooth on the other. Not an agressive tread pattern.

No comments on using Formica? A slight off-white with a matte finish is going to be much more pleasing to the eye, unless you like living in an exam room.
 

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How much trouble to bend 3/8's teak T&G?
I agree on the battens. leaves a chase for wiring and insulation like reflectix.
I wouldn't mind SS screw and washers for access, replacement.
With battens and screws if you don't like it, change is easy to something else.

I think cork is attractive also, comes in colors and has a nice pattern.
Plus it floats :)

I can't believe that something NSF approved is hard to clean. By definition, it would be non-absorbent and easy to clean.
 
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