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Tx - I am going to admit that I considered upgrading to a turbine series (500,900), knowing that it was complete overkill from the 2GM20. Larger filtration area in the media, larger bowl, etc.

I ended up figuring that I could buy a lot of 120 spin-on filters for the $300 it would cost me to upgrade.

I empathize with you, cause I went down the same thought process here...but at the end of the day, I think you got a single batch of bad gas. Continue to use the Startron (great stuff) and keep an eye on the water bowl of the filter. Keep the 120 and spend the $$ on a vacumn guage!

JS
 

· Ignoring Trolls in 2009
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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Thanks all for the feedback and advice. My decision is now made. Do my best effort at personal tank cleaning and fuel polishing. Keep the spin-on filters. Buy a pressure gauge. And probably most important, keep the unlimited towing and a large supply of cold adult beverages. :D

Michael
 

· Break, curse, fix, repeat
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Michael,
Just to beat a dead horse, I think you've hit upon the winning formula. Once your tank is clean, and you are on a regular filter replacement schedule and are reasonably diligent about filtering your fuel as it goes into the tank, I don't think you will find the pressure gauge necessary. One was already installed on Aeolus, and I took it off and got rid of it because it was so unnecessary. Never budged. Seems to me a gauge is most useful if you like to live by the edge and wait for your vacuum to go up due to a plugged filter. Not cheap, and a pain to install. You might at least wait to install the gauge until you have done everything else and spin off your filter and see if it shows any sign of clogging.

I like risks more than most people, but not when it comes to safety gear on my boat. By not having the gauge, I don't have an excuse for laziness, so just consider my primary filter change as part of normal annual maintenance. I motor about 150 hours a year.

Again, best of luck and happy sailing.
 

· Telstar 28
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TxLngHrn—

Sounds like you've got a fair bit of water sitting in the bottom of your tank. That would be a good explanation for all the water showing up in the fuel/water separator and also why your fuel filters are clogging so quickly. Clean out the tank very thoroughly... and you should have far fewer problems.
 

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Although the Racor 500 series is grossly over rated for sail boat use, the advantage is it is a top loading filter and a filter can easily be replaced in few minutes, plus filter elements are widely available and comparatively cheap, a case of 12 can be purchased for cruising spares for $100.

When cruising, there is a chance of picking up bad fuel, trying to overcome this problem, far from the operating areas of the tow boat services and the US Coast Guard, the top loading filter is much easier to replace at sea while the boat is pitching and rolling. Even dual switchable filters cannot help for long in this situation.
 
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