SailNet Community banner
1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have no fuel guages other than a tank tender. When I am fueling topside I obviously cannot watch the tank tender located near the nav station and it is a very tedious job preventing a fuel spill due to over filling my tanks. I recently saw this product on-line and wondered if anyone has installed it on their boat. If so, how does it perform and are you happy with it? It is called the "fuel Whistle" and it can bee seen here on
greenmarineproducts.com
 

·
Senior Mumble
Joined
·
320 Posts
I'd read good things about it, so I bought one thinking it would be a 5 minute install. I discovered that the vent line in my boat is molded into the glass under the cockpit al the way to the thruhull on the transom. So I returned it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
86 Posts
I would not rely on the automatic shutoff. Fines for even a small spill could be substantial. I'm curious as well. Looks like it would do the job.:eek: :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,647 Posts
If you don't trust the shut off nozzle, how about watching the pumps to see how much fuel you have pumped.
My capacity is twenty gallons, I have half a tank full, I've pumped 8 gallons, I think its time to slow down.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,070 Posts
Actually when taking on fuel; I determine how much fuel I will be needing and ask for that amount.
This requires the knowledge of the Max capacity of your tank/s minus the 10% for expansion of the fuel and then how much I have left in those tanks.
If your fill is a straight shot into the tank or each of your tanks then you can sound them with a tape measure (steel). Read the tables for the tanks for the amount you have in the tanks.
You do know you tank capacity?
And the what each inch is in Gallons? Hmmmmm?

Make sure that all cross connects are closed and fill one tank at a time.
No Smoking!
All Passengers ashore!
And have some one watching the fuel vents for any over flow into the catch-basins. A flat sided bucket with the lip taped to the side will improve you chances of not having a spill from the vents that vent straight over board.
 

·
Senior Mumble
Joined
·
320 Posts
Our tank vent is lower than the deck fill, so excess fuel will come out of the vent before the splash back will automatically shut off the pump. Even if the vent was in sight while filling, I'd hate to wait until I overflow to stop filling. I know my capacity, but my usage is an estimate at best, an estimate that I refine as I go by filling the tank to capacity each time I fill it. I also feel more comfortable with my estimate of how much fuel remains (and therefore how much is needed) if the starting point is a full tank, rather than some guesstimate.

The whistle is supposed to make a very loud, shrill sound while filling until the fuel level blocks the vent hose, at which point it stops. It seems like an easy, inexpensive thing to do to avoid spills. And nary a magnet, nor other dubious science, in sight!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,155 Posts
Probably works OK, I tell the fuel attendent how much fuel it should take then hold a towel under the vent and put my ear to the vent, when it goes "Gurgle" I say stop. You can't spill a drop here without reporting and this method works for me.
 

·
.
Joined
·
1,000 Posts
excellent post.

Thank you..I really like it, and am buying one.

I have gauges and what not on my diesel tanks (I have 2 tanks), and the pumps have auto stop, but one can never be too sure,.

rep point for you

Thanks
 

·
Member
Joined
·
560 Posts
These whistles are installed on heating oil tanks. Oil delivery men can't see the tank in your basement, just the fill stem outside and the vent with a whistle in it.

When a company makes 1,000s of deliveries, it doesn't want to be wasting product with each delivery.

They work. I've never dealt with them on a boat, but I know that in practice, they are very effective.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Well, my problem is the fuel vent is below the filler port and it is easy to vent fuel when trying to top off. By the time I could ever get auto shutoff from the nozzle I would be venting heavily. I can estimate the amount used but that is just an estimate so knowing the exact amount to pump is hit and miss. When leaving the boat for lengthy periods I always like to top off to the very top of the tank to minimize any airspace void in the tank.

Thanks for the responses. I think I will install one and report back on my experience with it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
I had one on my stinkpot decades ago. Doesn't matter how high the vent line port is. Once the tank is full, no more air comes out the vent line and the whistle stops.
The only problem with mine was that it was extremely loud, other people at the gas station gave me stares, so I wrapped a muffler around it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23 Posts
:) I installed one of these little devises on my tank a couple years ago. Haven't spilled a drop since. Also I never have to clean up the deck or topsides from diesel fuel, yuk! I can't see why boats are not built with them at the factory. Fortunately my tank vent line was really accessible and the install only took a couple of minutes. The install when building the boat should be a piece of cake. Most hull vent fittings are installed below the deck fill so by the time the automatic shut off works, the fuel is pissing out the vent.
My recommendation is that everyone should have one, just my 2 cents...
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top