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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm rigging my new-to-me boat for the first time. It has an old, odd furling system that I can't identify. My question is about routing the halyard.

The furler uses a single, coninuous control line that takes a single pass around the drum. A wire halyard runs through a channel in the foil sections to a sheave attached to the top of the foil. The halyard is clipped, not spliced, to a 5/16 rope halyard just long enough to reach the deck. The top sheave is in an aluminum casting shaped such that the only direction for the halyard to feed off it is down. The sheave casting is fixed to the top of the foil, with no apparent provision for a swivel. There are cleats on the bottom casting of the foil above the drum, and two 3/4" plastic sheaves side by side in the drum. These smaller sheaves are in line with the top sheave.

This does not look like any kind of furling system that I have been able to find referenced on the web. It would appear to me that this unit was designed so that the halyard runs back down paralell to the foil, does a 180 under one of the small sheaves, and then cleats off on the foil. Thus, the whole shebang, halyard and all, would turn with the foil. This would put the halyard inside the furled sail, and provide no means for controlling halyard tension except from the foredeck.

Does anybody recognize this system? Is my interpretation of the halyard routing correct? Everything I've read about furling units talks about halyard wrap, proper jib halyard tension, and various adustments for same. It seems to me that adjusting halyard tension on this rig would be difficult if not impossible. Is that because, on a setup like this, halyard tension or adjustment is not an issue? It would also seem to be impossible to incur halyard wrap under any conditions. Was this perhaps a design consideration? If so, what is being traded off?

The boat is a 30' Catalina. It uses a 150 genoa. Any input would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!!
 

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Photos would really help on a post like this....
 

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I've seen such furlers before.. you are correct in that once tensioned, the halyard can only be retensioned/adjusted by going forward to the headsail tack. This system would certainly qualify as unusual on a boat the size of a Catalina 30. The "racer" in you won't like it.......

The advantage of such systems is immunity from halyard wrap, and no loads on the deck fittings that you get with led aft halyards.
 

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I am the Alado rep for Canada. Much of the desrp sounds like our units but not the single continuous line on the drum nor the combo wire and rope halyard. Check out ALADO CANADA - Furler and Roller - main page on the specs page where you will see pics of the various pieces for installation.
Tensioning the halyard is only possible at the drum area.
Don
 

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This sounds almost exactly like the elderly CDI furler which was fitted to my Morgan 30 when I bought it. Except that, in my case, the sheave was missing from the top of the furler and therefore the arrangement was non-functioning. I eventually replaced it with a mdern CDI with a plastic foil, which has been absolutely great so far.

Stuart
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the references to Alado and CDI. They are both similar in concept in that they have self contained halyards. Mine has all of the same features as the Alado, including the provision for flying two headsails. I would guess that mine is an older design by one of these manufacturers.

My primary concern was about the self contained halyard idea. That is like nothing that I've ever seen, so I wasn't sure if I had even the basic concept right. Looking at these other designs, I think that I can get this thing back together and working now. It's still in reasonably good shape, so I'm re-fitting everything and hopefully will be able to squeeze a few more years ot of it.

SD, I have a good pic of each end, but I don't know how to post pics yet. :eek:

Thanks to all, this has been very helpful!
 

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rayncyn51. If you do keep the unit check in with Alado Nautica USA who can likely assist if there are any parts needed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks, I'll do that. Unless it fails completely, it's going to serve for at least one more season.

I would just like to say that whoever built this unit did a heckuva good job. The poly bearing surfaces look like new. The only problem I've had is that the 3 bolts holding the drum to the foil have stripped out. There is enough extra material on the drum that I was able to drill and tap a larger size with no problem. Hopefully it'll work as good as it looks! - r
 

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rayncyn51. Your furler sounds very similar to a Reefer I or II that was manufactured by Cruising Design, Inc. which has been out of business for quite awhile. A traveler slides in one groove of the aluminum foil and the sail slides in the second groove. If you have pictures to post, I may be able to confirm. I happen to have an assembly guide that came with my "new" 1987 Watkins.
 

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rayncyn51. Your furler sounds very similar to a Reefer I or II that was manufactured by Cruising Design, Inc. which has been out of business for quite awhile. A traveler slides in one groove of the aluminum foil and the sail slides in the second groove. If you have pictures to post, I may be able to confirm. I happen to have an assembly guide that came with my "new" 1987 Watkins.
CDI certainly ain't out of business. They are alive and well, operating out of Homer, NY and still advertising widely.

Stuart
 

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Leither, sorry for the misinformation, what I meant was the Reefer I & II was made when CDI was in Peabody, Massachusetts and is not manufactured as it has been replaced by the Flexible Furler which came out in the late 1980s.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
HPLou, You nailed it... CDI's web site has a parts section for older designs. Mine does appear to be a Reefer I system. Would you be able to scan/fax your assembly guide? I would happily reimburse any cost you may incur doing so. - r

BTW, my son lives in Keansburg. Are you anywhere near there?
 

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Leither, sorry for the misinformation, what I meant was the Reefer I & II was made when CDI was in Peabody, Massachusetts and is not manufactured as it has been replaced by the Flexible Furler which came out in the late 1980s.
Thanks for the clarification. You also seem to have identified the mystery furler correctly, so well done!

Stuart
 

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rayncyn51, no problem in faxing a copy of the assembly guide, you can e-mail your fax number to [email protected] and I can get it to you over the weekend and thanks Leither.

Lou

BTW, not too far from Keansburg, live in Highland Park.
 

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Jib Furler

I have a Beneteau 473, that was recently purchased used.

It has the Pro-Furl system on the jib, I assume.

I replaced all the lines, except the jib halyard. I also replaced the sails from a reputable sailmaker, Quantas. Under sail I noticed that the furling system stuck both when unfurling and furling. I was able to sort it out with brute strength, which created problem #1.

While under sail the halyard suddenly broke, roughly 6" above the connecting point to the top drum.

We dropped the sail and gave it a good inspection while back at port. The drums, both top and bottom seem to turn freely when there is no load on them. They are a sealed system, so no need to lubricate them.

I had the jib halyard replaced and everything seemed operating while at the dock. When we unfurled the sail when at sea, it jammed again. We ended up unwinding it by hand, rather than force it again. When we returned to port, we also had to hand wind the sail.

I looked at the halyard and sail and it appears OK, so I can't understand why it is jamming.

Has anyone experienced this before? It is a real pain and I do not want to risk breaking the halyard again.

Biggest issue is that I cannot reef the jib, other than by hand, which would be a huge challenge if we got caught in a blow.

All comments are welcome.

Regards

Jbad
 

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Putting together the jamming and the broken halyard, it sounds like the halyard is getting wound up at the top ie the top swivel is jamming, even though it seems to be turning OK when not under load. Have you had a look up at the top of the furler while the sail is being furled? You should be able to see the halyard winding around the foil, if this is the problem.

The other thing to look at is the angle that the halyard makes with the mast when the jib is up. If this is too shallow (eg caused by the jib not being fully up), then this encourages the winding round problem.

Stuart
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Follow Up

We finally got the boat out under sail and gave the ol' furler a try. Everything worked great, tho it's a bit tighter than I'd like when furling in. This is the first time that I've used a fulring system of any kind, so I've nothing to compare to. At face value, the unit seems to work as well as it's age would allow. (Like me!) Hopefully it will serve through next season!

Thanks again to all for your assistance! :) :) - Ray'n'Cyn
 

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Excellent - it does sound as though the old furler still has some life left in it!

As to how much of a pull is required to achieve a complete furl, that will depend on circumstances, as well as the furler itself. Taking the load off the gear by coming into the wind before furling seems like a good idea, but often (usually?) results in a very messy end result. On the other hand, furling while the genoa is full of wind and straining at its sheets can result in a lot of hard work........:)

Stuart
 

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Heading into the wind is usually necessary to furl. It relieves the pressure on the control line.

BTW Continuous-line furlers are often not recommended for reefing the head sail. I have a ProFurl continuous-line furler. The control line goes around a drum that is shaped like a V to pinch the line so as to provide the necessary friction for the drum to turn as you pull on the line. Reefing puts the onus of holding the reef on the line/drum interface. The tension of holding the reef in could cause the line to give way (which would be dangerous in heavy air) or to pinch to the point that it won't release when you need to furl (or unfurl).

That said, we do it all the time.
 
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