SailNet Community banner
1 - 20 of 48 Posts

·
no longer reading SailNet
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
Hanks.

Furler upgrades aren't low cost. You'll need a new jib and probably a new forestay as well. The furler is less than half the cost of the system.

A jib bag is a cheap upgrade to a 24' boat that makes handling the jib easier (you can flake it on the foredeck) without the costs of furlers.
 

·
Doesn't sail enough
Joined
·
623 Posts
There is some stuff online for building your own furler, basically you find some good swivel hardware and then build yourself a drum to fit on it. Could be doable for a 24' boat, not sure I'd want to try it much bigger than that.

Doing a jib bag (sailrite kit, or roll-your-own) could be nearly as good a solution if your real goal is getting on the water quick.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
mainly concerned about bringing jib down while single handing in heavy weather. am working on putting jack lines together.

will look at Harken and jib bag options.

are the DIY ones pretty robust if done right? is there something about the manufactured ones that cannot be replicated?
 

·
Doesn't sail enough
Joined
·
623 Posts
It's all about the quality of your swivel - that's what's carrying the forestay tension.

A furler is not a perfect heavy-weather solution; can't easily furl the jib when it's under pressure.
 

·
Doesn't sail enough
Joined
·
623 Posts
I can't answer that - I've had the luxury of knowing when it's going to be nasty, and putting on the 85% blade at the dock. My old boat was about the size of yours. When it got really nasty out, I stayed put :) though it did sail alright under storm jib and mizzen. No chance of making much way to weather like that.
 

·
Sailor
Joined
·
935 Posts
When single handing your success at sail handling is going to rely more on early weather prediction and early sail handling than anything else. Reduce sail before it is a necessity. Rolling up a furler in heavy conditions is extremely difficult. Sometimes it tempts you to use a winch on the control lines which puts high loads on the rigging. Where are your halyards tied off? At the mast? It would be easy to place the bag, free the halyard and quickly pull down the jib. If necessary, quickly lash sail on deck to secure until conditions improve and you can stow the sail. My vote is on the bag.

Tod
 

·
One of None
Hunter 34
Joined
·
8,647 Posts
What is a good low cost furler for a 24 foot boat (6000 lb displacement)?
low cost would be a friend that wants to sail with you.

biding that...

and until you can afford a CDI (cheapist) you can use a DOWNHAUL
 

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
small boats downhaul it is.

I used one extensively on my excalibur 26, 2 feet longer...I could dump the jib or genoa in seconds and secure it with a bungee...works great.

on small boats sail changes are easy and fast so I had a selection of jibs to chose from, I usually went from a 100% or so to a 145% ish genny.

btw I think a furler on a 26footer is a bit much...
 
  • Like
Reactions: andyselzn

·
no longer reading SailNet
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
mainly concerned about bringing jib down while single handing in heavy weather. am working on putting jack lines together.

will look at Harken and jib bag options.

are the DIY ones pretty robust if done right? is there something about the manufactured ones that cannot be replicated?
Add a downhaul line to your hanked on jib and you can pull it down from the cockpit. This is just a line that goes around the top hank and which is run back to the cockpit. Pull the line as you release the halyard and the sail will come straight down. There is an example here:
Jib Downhauls - San Juan 21 Fleet 1

If you thread the downhaul line between the hanks you can even have it flake the sail as it pulls it down.

Almost every part of a good furler is hard to replicate. You need to make a foil that fits a luff tape accurately so that the sail won't bind as you raise it, will drop smoothly when you release it, and which doesn't allow the luff tape to pull out. On top of this you need to have a two part swivel that lets the halyard stay in position while the head of the sail rolls up. Finally you need to build a drum that runs on smooth bearings and allows the sail to roll up under load.

The cheapest furlers (CDI and Alado) remove the top swivel and put the halyard on the furler itself. This removes an expensive piece of hardware from the design, but makes it difficult to do sail changes or adjust luff tension. Luff tension is an important sail control.

Even using the cheapest furlers (around $1000) the new sail and forestay will bring your total to over $2000. A downhaul and jib back will cost about $150.
 

·
first sailed january 2008
Joined
·
1,409 Posts
I have pretty close to the stuff you're asking about. I have a furler now and had hanks previously. I only singlehand. There are pros and cons to each. It also depends on what kind of heavy wind you are talking about.

Furler:
Far easier to get the sail up an sailing
Far easier to shorten sail quickly when the wind picks up. You can reef it. Say you start your day in 10 and want the whole sail, 135. In about a minute it's out and going without you having left the cockpit. Then the wind starts to pick up and you don't wait too long so you shorten in to a 100. All pretty quick without leaving the cockpit. The wind really picks up and you decide to take it down entirely. It can be hard but plan ahead and you should be able to. Buy when it's that windy, really, what is easy?

Hanks.
I thought I had more here. I guess I'm definitely recommending furling. I suppose if you need the sail down and down now its quicker and easier.

Is it cheaper? Doubtful. How much is a furler and sail for a 24 foot boat. $3000? How much are three headsails with hanks?
 

·
no longer reading SailNet
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
Hanks.
I thought I had more here. I guess I'm definitely recommending furling. I suppose if you need the sail down and down now its quicker and easier.
Sail changes are far easier with hanks than with a furler, especially when single handed.

Partially furled sails don't allow the boat to point well. I know you can add foam strips and a good furler has an indepedent tack swivel that winds the sail up tighter, my genoa has both of those things. My 135% sail still doesn't fly as well when rolled up to 105% as my 105% sail does. The 105% is cut flatter and has a finer entry and the boat heels less and points higher.

I have a furler now (and a nice one) with multiple headsails so I'm unlikely to change. However if I could go back two years I'd have switched my boat to hank on. I think it is easier and safer for boats up to 30' that are short handed compared to a furler.
 

·
first sailed january 2008
Joined
·
1,409 Posts
I hear you. I'm just learning my furler but so far it's been positive. It has the independent tack and swivel and my foresail has a foam luff. For me I'm not as concerned with maximizing performance. I don't race. I think you just have to singlehand day after day to understand. Plus I really try to take care of my boat so with hanks, I didn't do what a lot of people do and leave it lashed to the deck. I flaked and stowed it each night. Maybe overkill.

Don't forget two things:
1. I save all that space for not having to store multiple headsails on a small boat
2. I can quickly and easily reef to any possible sail. Do I want it to be a 117? Can do. No one carried as many hank on sails as a furler can become.

Christian. Who has a furler on a 26? I love how everyone always had an opinion about what people with smaller boats should and shouldn't have. How about I think your big boats you "sail" around the San Juan's with the sail cover still on is overkill. How about that. (Not directed at Christian, who I kinda like)
 

·
first sailed january 2008
Joined
·
1,409 Posts
Sail changes are far easier with hanks than with a furler, especially when singlehanded.
Except this. How is it easier for me alone to go up on deck and bring down a sail and raise a new one opposed to staying in the cockpit and pulling on one rope. With a furler that's my sail change. I pull on a rope. It takes like two seconds and now I've got a 110. I'm not afraid to go on deck or anything but it is nice.

The cost analysis also assumes he has a nice suite of hank on sails. If they are in need of replacing it's probably about the same to install a furler and sail as buy three new sails and downhaul system.
 

·
Registered
Corsair 24
Joined
·
4,594 Posts
I hear you. I'm just learning my furler but so far it's been positive. It has the independent tack and swivel and my foresail has a foam luff. For me I'm not as concerned with maximizing performance. I don't race. I think you just have to singlehand day after day to understand. Plus I really try to take care of my boat so with hanks, I didn't do what a lot of people do and leave it lashed to the deck. I flaked and stowed it each night. Maybe overkill.

Don't forget two things:
1. I save all that space for not having to store multiple headsails on a small boat
2. I can quickly and easily reef to any possible sail. Do I want it to be a 117? Can do. No one carried as many hank on sails as a furler can become.

Christian. Who has a furler on a 26? I love how everyone always had an opinion about what people with smaller boats should and shouldn't have. How about I think your big boats you "sail" around the San Juan's with the sail cover still on is overkill. How about that. (Not directed at Christian, who I kinda like)
dude the reason I say this,is if you read a bit is that most of my experience comes from small boat sailing including extensive sailing on a 28 ft wooden 1940s boats 8 thousand miles offshore...not to mention a 2 26 footers and a folkboat.

if someone said to me what would you like on that boat a furler or extra hank on sails my deifinitive answer is extra hank on sails which can be had for cheap.

if you think that Im trying to one up you here(because my current boat is mid 30s) you have me all wrong...:D

ps. the part in bold I couldnt agree more, like you there is nothing more offensive to me as a sailor to see someone get flabbergasted at a 15knot breeze, in his enclosed cockpit, furler sails, doesnt even dare take the cover off the mainsail for fear of heeling more than 10 degrees(on a monohull for crying out loud) and has the engine on just in case oh and dont forget the fenders hanging off the lifelines!

yeaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaah hell yeah, IM CRUISING!

jajajajajajajajaja
 
1 - 20 of 48 Posts
Top