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Discussion Starter #1
I''m trying again, after conducting more research. Any comments on Alado, Bamar, or Reef Rite furlers?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, hamiam, for your suggestion. I had not heard of the others either, until the recent article in Practical Sailor. Profurl is still on my list, but since it is more common it is easier to get comments on. These others are considerably less expensive, so I need to look into them.
 

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My only input is this: I get and read Practical Sailor and while no infallible I think they give fair reviews. If you do go with any of those furlers make sure you can get support and/or spare parts if need be. You may especially need support with the initial install. Good luck.
 

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I did some checking with one of the best professional riggers in the U.S. and he said that Schaefer was the best and Profurl and Harken were tied for #2.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Just to round this out, I bought an Alado furler. They are made in Brazil, are inexpensive, and got a couple of good reviews on another BB. I like a couple of their design features very well. We''ll see how it goes. Installation was incredibly easy, even with the less than stellar manual. I''m looking forward to trying the Kiwi slides, which technically go with the Reefrite furler from New Zealand, but which will work with any furler and replace luff tape.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Certainly. You can get the manufacturer''s side at aladous.com. You can also call David Davenport, whose number is on the site, anytime, and discuss the subject until your heart is content. There was a comment on Alado in the recent practical sailor, and I got another comment or two at the sailboatowners.com forum. Total cost of the furler, minus line and blocks, for my 35'' boat: $480.
 

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D:

Thanks for the URL. It appears to me this is a system similar to Famet''s (which has been around a long time and gets generally good marks, altho'' the new owner/mfgr. apparently has raised the price considerably). I''d suggest you look closely at how much tension you can apply to the halyard given the small sheaves being used; I appreciate how *high* tension isn''t as necessary when using a luff tape but, in larger rigs, I''d think available luff tension would be a concern.

The poly bushings are pretty common now; the real corrosion issue is WRT how the foil sections are joined (typically, stainless fasteners are used at some point). I liked seeing that Alado bothers to anodize some of their aluminum; it''s the only chance Aluminum has to co-exist with a salt water environment any length of time.

Jack
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Jack,

The foil sections interconnect with each other, not unlike a sliding puzzle. There are no fasteners other than the bushings which separate the foils from the stay. I particularly liked the fact that the system could be installed over my existing rod rigging, which is rare. Most systems either provide a new stay or require that you alter the existing one. I can''t say anything myself about longevity yet, but I did see a couple of good comments, so I have high hopes. At $480, I haven''t lost a lot if it doesn''t work out.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
My boat is a Santana 35, displacing about 8500 lbs. There are various parameters on the Alado website concerning which of their systems will work for you, but it appears that the only hardware differences are the number of foils you buy and the size of the bushings.
 

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wow, I have a santana 35 and am trying to decide between schaeffer 1100 and harken mkIII unit 1. Either way I''m looking at $1600 for the base system not counting a new forestay. I was going to get dyform 9/32" to replace the -8 rod and use mechanical sta-locs so I could do it myself, an extra $200 or so. All together I''m budgetting $2K.

for $480 though, it seems you bought the A0, I might have gone with the A2 which is $800. Still half the price I was considering.

I don''t know that I like the cast sheave block that sits at the top of the extrusion though.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
I''m not clear on what your issue is with the sheave other than the fact that it is cast, but having assembled it, I believe it will work well. I added the Kiwi slides myself, and am about to add the UV protection. Then we''ll see how it all goes.
 

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The Alado is similar to the Cruising Design in price and philosophy, without a halyard swivel. The torque on the extrusion connectors is the primary area to watch. Not crazy about roll pins, Harken used them, and occassionally the pin holes would elongate and the roll pin slip out a bit. Sometimes this would cause tears in the sail.

Keep a close eye on the feeder extrusion (connected to drum). Torque there is high.

Most damage to furlers (joints) happens during stepping/unstepping. Try to keep it staight.
 

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I have used a Furlex system for a number of years now and have been pretty pleased overall. The "Dockside" survey at my marina showed that the most popular are: 1) Profurl, 2) Harken (most delivered on the boat new) and 3) Furlex.

To a man, everyone seemed to think the Profurl as the top unit, best built and designed. But as I said, I''m very happy with the Furlex.

I try to look at critical systems on a boat and make sure that they are the best available. Cost is always an object during a purchase, but how much will the $500 - $1,000 saved be worth if your budget system jams at an inopportune moment? Or how great will the savings be if you can''t get parts or the company goes out of business? The industry leaders became that for a reason, and many have been around for a long time. That is not to say that any other companies can''t deliver a quality product or back it up with parts. It''s just that a furler is not just a critical system, it is one of the MOST critical systems, and to save a couple of hundred bucks there seems like a bad investment.

On my 37'' masthead rig, the Furlex has double races of ball bearings top and bottom, along with double races of ball bearings on the sail hoist also. Plus, the drum removes easily, and the twin grooves face aft for a very racy headstay.

The Dutch Wharf yard, (shameless plug for Paul and the crew) is very good with rig handling and there never seems to be a problem with the foil. They have a separate storage set up for furlers, which are never left with the rig during storage.
 

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my issue with the cast sheave block is that I prefer machined parts for their durability. It''s nitpicking and the price would go way up for that of course.

The fact the the halyards are integral with the extrusion is a wash - It seems akward to hoist a headsail from the bow pulpit but its nice that the halyard will never wrap.

Looking at the reefrite I like the downloader concept. I could see a heavy weather situation where you might drop a big genoa, leave it secured to the downloader at the luff and lash the clew to the lifelines and quickly raise a storm jib. There is no price break for the reefrite though, it costs about the same as the schaefer or the harken in the US, and I preffer the last two for the open torlon bearing races vs sealed steel ones. All seals fail.

with the Santana 35 fractional rig, my main concern is extrusion strength because the forstay goes through such a range of tension on a fractional. And in heavy air if you don''t set the running backs the extrusion could get really worked if it "pumps".

If I had known about the alado 5 years ago when my budget was tighter I would have gotten it for the price break but now I am not so sure, mainly because I will still change headsails often with the furler and I won''t want to stand at the forstay to do that.
 

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ProFurl

drynoc said:
Thanks, hamiam, for your suggestion. I had not heard of the others either, until the recent article in Practical Sailor. Profurl is still on my list, but since it is more common it is easier to get comments on. These others are considerably less expensive, so I need to look into them.
ProFurl may be a decent furling system but the company is impossible to do business with. Even the dealers complain that communication with them is nigh impossible. There specs on the same model furler vary from dealer to dealer. Very confusing. Was advised by one dealer to avoid a lot of frustration to buy a Harken or CDI.

FRANK
 

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I bought the New Profurl unit just after it was put on the market last spring. I bought it through Rigging Only. It took a couple of weeks to get as they were not even in the country yet. Jeff at Rigging Only was very helpful, gave me a good deal. If there were any issues with Profurl (Wichard) as a company, I didn't see them.
 

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Frank & T34C... Are you guys aware that this thread is over two-and-a-half years old.
 
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