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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey Ya'll,

I wanted to open this up to the group for some feedback: We have a 71' Seafarer 34 thats on the cusp of being fully restored this spring and I am debating over whether or not to "upgrade" the roller furler. The one that came with the vessel is a Furlex B MKII which is an obsolete model. That said I have taken it all apart and its in great shape, however, I cannot get the foils apart which is a moot point really as the entire system is discontinued, if something break its trash. Since we have all new rigging that is yet to be cut and installed the safety/convenience minded side of my brain is wondering if its not a good idea to upgrade and make the investment in a new system that can be serviced if need be? It would also mean my ten year investment in new rigging would be installed with a ten year investment in a new furler. Does anyone have any opinions on the Furlex, any known issues other that the documented foil separation issue (does not seem to be an issue on mine as I literally cannot get them apart). We plan on doing the whole Caribbean cruising thing in the fall and have engineered and planned for the weather conditions this locale may present. If the furler is sound and up to the task should I just keep it until it is not and worst case replace the headstay if a new system requires? Any input on the matter is appreciated, this is the time of year that furlers are on sale. THANKS
 

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I'd suggest you give Florida Rigging & Hydraulics, and ask to speak to Peter Linwick...

Pete probably knows as much about these units as anyone... Also, there's a good chance he might have parts for a discontinued laying around... Years ago I needed to replace an extrusion on an old Profurl, not even Profurl or Wichard could help me out... Pete looked around their warehouse, turned out they had about a dozen pieces tucked away somewhere...

Pete's a great guy, the most knowledgeable rigger I know, a fantastic resource when it comes to anything to do with rigging, windlasses, hydraulics, you name it... And, he'll give you a good deal...
 

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Why do you need to take the foils apart? If you're just replacing the wire you dont need to disassemble the foils. you just need to tack weld the new wire to the end of the old wire and then pull it through.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've put a call into the riggef with no word back. To be clear I am interested in hearing from people who have owned or own this furler model and their experience with it in terms of reliability and durability. Ours looks good but if they have known issues I would like to hear about them now. If they have a good reputation than I'll use it. These furlers use a sta lock fitting at the base so your fore stay is cut about a foot short of the deck making it an issue to get a newer furler model fitted. You most likely need a full length stay for those
 

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I guess I will jump into the mix. I have the same Furlex unit and I have two issues that I can't wrap my head around. In the manual it states the furling line shall exit on the port side of the drum. If it exited the port side of the drum then the Jib's sun cloth would be on the wrong side, I must be missing something?

Lastly the prefeeder line broke do I have to drop the Jib and replace it or is it only for the raising of the Jib?
 

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In the manual it states the furling line shall exit on the port side of the drum. If it exited the port side of the drum then the Jib's sun cloth would be on the wrong side, I must be missing something?
I have the same model. I don't recall the passage you quoted. I've copied the relevant paragraph from my manual below. My extrusions have 2 grooves, and which groove you use determines which side the furling line exits on. You choose the side depending on which side of your sail the sun cover is on.
8. Hoisting the sail in the correct groove through the sail feeder. If the furling line exits on the port side of the line drum, the sail should be hoisted in the starboard groove. If the line exits on the starboard side, use the port groove. Hoisting the sail in the "right" groove reduces initial resistance when furling the sail, which then has less of a "fold" along the forestay than if the other groove is used.
Re: the OP's question, for what it's worth, mine works flawlessly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Its good to hear some positive responses to this unit. I called the rigging company that supplied our materials and they have good experience with Furlex and this unit in particular. The salesman was quite knowledgeable and outlined a few benefits to this unit: the ball bearings and races are specially heat treated to a temper that makes them less susceptible to wear, they are also over sized. Also he said that they perform very well and he recommended I not replace the unit even though he is a dealer, he said if it works it should work for a long time if greased. Thanks for the heads up on the correct direction to wrap and lead the sail as I do not have any documentation.
 

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So far the furlux B has turned out to be a great unit! Mine looks and works great. After a little grease and love I can furl the Genoa with a snap of the wrist.

After a little research about my earlier question I have found the answer. So the preferred method (80% of the time)is to have the furling line exit the port side of the drum and run aft down the port side of the boat, but if it done the other way the world will not end. It will just be out of standard and perhaps someone could argue that it is out of spec, but all the riggers I have talked to said its fine.

On mine the line feeds out the Strb side of the drum and runs down the port side.
 

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......

On mine the line feeds out the Strb side of the drum and runs down the port side.
This has more to do with which way the sail has to roll up (ie which side the UV cover is on) than anything else. Beyond that there's no 'rule'...

I think that just about any of today's headsail furlers are thoroughly de-bugged and that most issues are the result of bad practice, or a sub standard installation.

btw - re your 'pre feeder' - the luff tape should be cut so that once the sail is hoisted the prefeeder falls free. It's a PITA to lower the sail and have to pass it through the prefeeder then too.

You should be able to replace/re-rig the prefeeder any time. btw, it's not a bad idea to drop your sail a few times a year at least to check that your halyards are all in good shape, shackles OK and so that you know how to do it.. It's not unusual to have someone post to ask 'how does my roller furler jib come down??'
 

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Whilst we are on the subject of Type B mark 2, I am replacing the headstay but cannot get the cone out of the staylock fitting.
I followed the manual instructions remove the eye, then the concave grommet that fits in the eye to deform the wire, replaced eye and give it a smack to drive the outer off the cone & wire--no luck & don't want to hit it any more!
Any body have any suggestions?
 

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I have the same unit, and the original manual. I just completely rebuilt the unit. You do not need to take foils apart to replace headstay, it will slide right through. To disassemble you need to slide core sections to remove "u" clips, can't be done until bottom disassembled . Be very careful whacking on the end as you can bend the shaft...trust me I know, I had to straighten mine. The tough part is the headstay length, it will change your weather helm! Take a precise measurement before starting. The manual, Selden/furlex is available online. It is best to have a complete understanding of the system. I was able to clean and reuse balls and races by using a good grease to hold them in place for reassembly. As for port side lead...it has to do with the partial dwell of the lower (tack) bearing to enhance furling. Hope this helped...
 

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For anyone with a stubborn stalok. I had to completely dissemble the furler guts by removing grub screw and locking the unit by putting a 1/4" punch thru alloy outer and into detente so the stalok male with cone/wire could be unscrewed.
Still had to drive the cone out and replace.PIA! All good now though.
I had to cut head foil down though as
swageless fittings do not fit inside the
Headfoil as does swaged, making it longer. Many thanks to Richard (rigger) for the talk through.
 

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Prefeeder is just a length of 1/4 bungee. It has a wire barb that pierces bungee and a hook that straddles from one luff groove to the other. Bungee exits around roller at base, (feed from bottom and slide up with pick). There is a special knot for bungee at prefeeder in the manual available online. There are just two screws (maybe only one) holding the foil feeder halves together. Less than 30 minute fix... The prefeeder may not be necessary with two people hoisting, by myself it is invaluable ...cheers!
 

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I replaced all standing rigg some 3-4 years ago but opted to keep the Furlex furler which the rigger recommended. A mistake, it lasted just two years more, then I had to buy a new furler.

A well maintained Furlex may last many years, but it does have a limited life time.

/J
 

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hi all I've been reading SailNet's vast array of supportive, interesting and insightful articles and forums for years, but only recently took the plunge (bought an old boat), so naturally, at what seemed like my first perplexity(*), made my way here.

Not surprisingly, I found everything I needed to know (so far*) in an instant.

So, while casually eye-balling the deck rigging one day last month, I spied the enclosed (D6), lying up against a toe-rail amidships, looking important, somehow, but loose, and decidedly out of place.

I did not immediately associate it with the furler, (or much else, being quite green at all this) but stowed it below, for future reference.

well, last night, I began to peruse the many manuals that came with the boat, to hopefully find that part, where it belonged, and how long before the rig came crashing down, and happened to pick up the Furlex Manual first (intuitive or what?), and there was D6, on the cover ! The part (for all the engineering that seems to have gone into it) is not named within the manual - it's just one of a few components of the pre-feeder! A stopper? with a special knot!

So I (not knowing much at all) searched SailNet and found this Furlex thread, and instantly, deliriously became a SailNet member, specifically to determine if I needed to shinny up the forestay, and how fast, to replace, and the best technique for doing that (shinnying), and whether I should pack a lunch or not, and in the blink of an eyesplice I find it mentioned (by S34 in Post #14) that, according to some, it may not be necessary at all?!, but then, one post later (Post #15, by captjcook), it's practically all demystified, when he states that it's 'invaluable' when hoisting by himself.
Since all lines lead aft, in my old G30 (and single-handing was part of the plan -- I will let you know how that goes), I will perform that simple re-install. Will have to practice that knot! and get it TIGHT!

The question is: What is this "hoisting" you talk about... it's a furler! shouldn't the term be "furling"?
Thanks.
(*There will be more!)
 

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