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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Headstay on the top of my furling jib came unwound when the mast was taken down. Anyone have suggestions on how to fix this or is it okay to keep as is for next time the mast is up?
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That forestay definitely needs to be replaced! That happens when the furler does not rotate independently on the forestay, so instead the forestay twists, forming what is called a " birdcage". A common cause of that problem is when the genoa halyard angle relative to the forestay is too shallow. That causes the halyard to wrap around the forestay and grab it when furling, instead of the swivel doing its job.

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that is an interesting top on the OP's furler foil looks like it was designed to snag the halyard. if it did not have the cut a way portion I would say it is a halyard deflector
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Suggestions on how to fix or what to do going forward? Thanks.

and yes, it is a pro furle.
 

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It's tolerably easy and cheap to replace yourself. Buy some wire, a couple of swageless fittings such as sta-lok or norseman. Measure very carefully and pull the new wire in with the old. You can disassemble the extrusions, but you don't need to. Well, from your picture there might be some broken strands on the inside that will snag on the connectors between the extrusion sections. YouTube has lots of videos about it.

You could take it to a rigger to fix for you.
 

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I‘m big on DIY, but have always found it preferable to leave the standing rigging to the pros. Far too much at stake, from a failure. Life and death actually. By no means is it foolish to DIY, just be sure one knows what they don’t know and does it correctly.

In this case, I’d probably do the furling disassembly, take the forstay to the rigger and ask them to replicate it. I find, when they don’t have to travel to or work aboard, cost is pretty reasonable.
 

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Swageless fittings are expensive. By the time you buy the wire and the fittings a rigger could probably make one up for you.
Yep, much more than swaged, but still a sta-lok is only $30-40 (US$), so you can replace the forestay for about $150. You can save some money by having one end swaged.

If you can disassemble the extrusions, the cheapest and easiest solution is to take (or ship) the old wire to a rigger, but if your extensions have corroded screws, taking it apart might bring along a slew of other problems. I believe ProFurls of that age have stainless screws in aluminum fittings, which is always a joy.
 
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