SailNet Community banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello all

I hope to replace the engine water intake "seacock" on my boat this fall, following mainesail's approach as seen here;
Marine How To - Compass Marine - Boat Repair Free Information

The link above is not a direct link, but you can find where he details how to replace a seacock using G10 without thru hull bolts.

I said my seacock in quotes because it is not an actual seacock, more of a marine version of a water tap fitting that is not bolted to the hull in any way. Regardless, ideally I would use G10 but I live in Canada and finding a G10 supplier is not easy, particularly in small quantities. So what material would work as a substitute? White oak saturated in resin?

For what it is worth, in my situation, a contessa 26 the water intake fitting passes thru the hull, at a point where the hull is sharply curved(convex) so I really do need to to build in a flat surface to bolt the new seacock to but I do not want to pass bolts thru the hull.

The current "seacock" does sit on a flat bed made of something, not really sure what it is. The problem for me is that the flat bed is not large enough for the foot print of the new seacock, so it needs to come out and be replaced.

Not sure if I am explaining things very well, regardless..
Alternatives to G10, any thoughts?

Thanks,
John

p.s Got the haul out contract from the marina today, why does summer fly by and winter lasts for an eternity? Is it wrong for me to hate people who live south of the Mason Dixon line? Why can't I have an endless summer?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
372 Posts
Why don't you make your own with stitch mat and resin. I made 7 for my boat! I made a form out of plywood base and cut a 3/4 inch length of pine to make a box on top of the ply, then a plywood cap to fit inside. Line the little box with poly wet out your layers of mat, stack each as you wet out, cover with poly add a weight to compress some what, and squeeze out some excess resin. When cured pop it out and make the next! I made all 7 in about 2 hrs.
 

·
69' Coronado 25
Joined
·
323 Posts
Hello all

Is it wrong for me to hate people who live south of the Mason Dixon line? Why can't I have an endless summer?
Year round means more maintenance, cleaning, and things wear out more frequently, you pay for your slip all year too.

owning a boat in a year round climate is much more costly.....

The biggest drawback is.... wait for it..... you get to sail all the time so there is not enough time to do all the tasks that need to be done.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,155 Posts
You will have a blast with this websitehttp://www.mcmaster.com/#grade-g-10-garolite/=tgvmlw As far as the summer down here , we think it goes by to fast too . Don't hate people , love people . I my self just want to be woved .McMaster-Carr
And while G10 is excellent stuff, they also sell structural grade FRP for about 1/2 the price. It all depends on what you need, and I'm quite certain that structural FRP is stronger than the base layup in most cases. I have used this grade for projects that have taken a lot of strain; very strong. I would only bother with G10 if the project had to hold threads... though I have used the structural grade for this.

McMaster-Carr

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
426 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the replies;

I like the idea of making my own, I'll have to give that some thought.

Sadly McMaster Carr doesn't ship to Canada or any other international shipping any more. Not sure why but the internet is lit up over the decision. Something about a shipment to a questionable destination that went wrong. Too bad as they are a online paradise for the DIY'er.

I don't really hate you all in warm climates, jealousy is such an ugly emotion.

John
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,819 Posts
You can also look for GPO-3 which is a polyester resin based option to G-10.... Sadly GPO-3 is less widely used and the cost is often similar to G-10, I suspect due to less volume...

Check eBay though, lots of folks getting rid of scraps...
 

·
baDumbumbum
Joined
·
1,142 Posts
We use a lot of Paperstone (phenolic countertop material) for backing plates & core replacement. Other solid surface countertop materials may work for you -- need to scout their properties, tho. Some are chunkier than others. At any rate, cabinet shops or countertop fabricators probably have a bin of offcuts hanging around. Googling 'phenolic Ontario' or 'Paperstone Ontario' turns up many interesting sources. Srsly -- I can't bring myself to toss the remnants ($60US per square ft, dealer cost) but freely give them out to people who want a chunk for this and that.

Don't advise tapping the stuff, however. It is not as good as G10 for tapping. Stainless T-nuts on the backside would work.
 

·
Old enough to know better
Joined
·
4,346 Posts
And while G10 is excellent stuff, they also sell structural grade FRP for about 1/2 the price. It all depends on what you need, and I'm quite certain that structural FRP is stronger than the base layup in most cases. I have used this grade for projects that have taken a lot of strain; very strong. I would only bother with G10 if the project had to hold threads... though I have used the structural grade for this.

McMaster-Carr
Great resource lists all kinds of plastics and there general properties. I just lost an hour at work reading through it!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
I sent you a personal message on this. I make my own backing plates at around 5/8 thick. i use a mix of glasses and directions to get good strength properties and vacumme down the repair to get the best resin to cloth ratio using laminating epoxy. I have the same issue as you where some of my through hulls are on a curved area. i got around this by taping down a non porus PTFE sheet at .001" with a silicone .001" tape. the layup paper conforms to the hull i then place 5 layers (plaine weave and CSM) to make a solid base shape of the hull and vacumme it to the hull. once its cured i pull it out and then complete my layers on top of this using biaxial cloth in 0 45 90 orientations, CSM and roven woven with 2 layers of plain weave on both sides. Like everything else it is vacumed down to 20+ in for the best and smoothest results from there i use a hole saw to cut it then drill my bolt holes and tap it. or i can epoxy stainless t nuts but if you do that you have to put silicone between the bolt and through hull or you will get dissimilar metal corrosion. IF you guys need any help with this let me know
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top