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John or anyone. I just picked up a 15. I'm looking for info and wonder if someone could call me? Not clear on how the self bailing plug works and lines in the rudder. Tim 859 468 7300 any help appreciated
Thanks
Congrats. I bought a Galilee 15 a few months ago too. The bailing plug has a lever that engages a cam when pressed to wedge the plug into the hole in the deck. Simple as that. The rudder is buoyant, so you'll use one of the lines to deploy when on the water. The other is used to stow. Both route through holes on either side of rudder handle hardware. There is a cleat at the base of the rudder handle to hold tension on the active line. There is a good illustration of the rudder lines earlier in this thread. I can share some pictures if my account will allow. Cheers, Dan
 

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Hi Dan
Thanks for the info. Unfortunately my self bailing consists of an opening through the hull and a plug that screws into the top. Would you have anymore info or a picture. I guess the cam was removed???
Also, we replaced the lines in the rudder anticipating the lines to do exactly what you described. The lines come up the tube to the top of the tiller but they do not move the rudder up or down. We were unclear how the lines could move as the plates on the rudder press in on the rudder permitting no movement. Sorry for the extended message but I can't find explanation anywhere on these questions. If you would call 859 468 7300 that would be great! Thanks
Make sure the rudder pivots up and down freely. Your locking nut might be too tight. Also check that the lines aren't inadvertently snagged between the rudder and metal plates between which the rudder pivots. I found both issues to be true for mine. The guy who sold it had recently painted it and got a bit sloppy assembling and overzealous when tightening. The lines route behind the rudder and up the tube. One of the lines routes over a pivot to provide mechanical advantage to pull the rudder upward. The rudder is buoyant and does require a pretty firm tug to deploy when submerged. I'll take some pics and post in a bit. Cheers, Dan
 

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Pics of cockpit plug, rudder and the screw plug aft. I leave all these plugs closed. The white line on rudder is pulled to deploy while an alternate cable routes internally under the top bolt in the rudder pic. The bolt has a rotating sleeve that reduces drag when pulling rudder up.
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Pics of cockpit plug, rudder and the screw plug aft. I leave all these plugs closed. The white line on rudder is pulled to deploy while an alternate cable routes internally under the top bolt in the rudder pic. The bolt has a rotating sleeve that reduces drag when pulling rudder up. View attachment 139956 View attachment 139957 View attachment 139958
FYI The illustration of rudder lines was captured earlier in this thread - https://www.sailnet.com/attachments/galileerudder-jpg.118266/
 

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Ha! My rudder is backwards! Lovely… This predates my incompetence for sure. There is a bracket on the aft of rudder to keep it stowed upwards that has a purple line connected. This was installed by prior owner. So oops on them. Perhaps the engagement of rudder works better in proper orientation? No idea. The “self bailing” feature I believe is a reference to the boats integral foam and buoyancy. If one is to move forward after pulling the drain plug the water should evacuate. It definitely doesn’t bail when I am sitting by drain hole. Found this out the last time on water. Me and the outboard are too much ballast for the boat to overcome. Water flowed up like a fountain when I inadvertently dislodged the plug.
 

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So I just removed the rudder to flip it and reverse the hardware mounted on it. I’m going to pass on reattaching the hardware. Turns out this was not watertight and allowed water to breach the interior of the rudder. Thing was completely waterlogged. Weighed a good 5-10 lbs more than it should. DOH! I got the water out and epoxied over the holes. I’ll reattach cables and come up with a sling to secure the rudder. Good eye!
 

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Oh, so again the fact that a “properly” functioning rudder is buoyant makes deploying and raising on water easier. It should definitely pivot easily when mounted. Pulling firmly on the cables is enough on the water, but the exercise on land feels futile. There was cussing involved when wife and I were testing it on land.
 

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Also, it looks like you aren't routing the cables into the rudder correctly and as a result they are binding up. They need to run through guide holes on edge near each hole and hen you knot them in the large
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…knot them in the large recessed hole. Your cords might be too thin to knot once, you might need to knot them a few times to ensure they don’t pull out. On mine it appears they were dipped in epoxy to ensure they stayed knotted.
 

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Yeah, that's a quandary.. perhaps the holes were plugged up? You definitely can't have the rope wrapped around the rudder. That will seize it up for sure.
 
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