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Bill SV Rangatira
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I have pretty much decided I need to do a remodel / redesign of my Galley. One of my primary concerns is the icebox is under the starboard quarterberth and thinkin if i give up some storage under the galley i could fit it in the starboard galley and get more depth and room for better insulation maybe eventually goin to a holdover plar or some other type of refer system. With the change from the old stove with oven to a gimballed wallas 1000 with no oven i have alot of space below there perhaps if i moved some storage to there i would be able to fit the icebox in the counter top.
DISCOVERY 32 sailboat specifications and details on sailboatdata.com
any constructive ideas and suggestions would be helpfull.
I am not afraid to build new cabinets from scratch
Bill
SV Rangatira
Sailing the Rangatira
 

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Bill, I have only used my oven one time in the five years I've owned my Morgan 33 OI - just once. Most of the meals are either prepared on the stove on on the gas grill mounted on the stern rail. That space the oven takes up would be far better utilized if I had a nice refrigerator/freezer there.

Good luck,

Gary :cool:
 

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Things like this are truly personal...

Myself, I don't like the top-load counter fridges/freezers because they take away counter space...duh..which can be used for scattered/unorganized space.
Ideally, on a mono hull, I'd like to have pull out fridge/freezer that's under dedicated disorganized space above.

Although I can make pizza that would kill you and me, I really have no real need for an oven. I think ovens are more of a chick thing.

Fridge thing....
The portable fridge/freezers out now are pretty darn efficient.
People are spending a lot of money building in-counter, permanent installs to be efficient.

Maximizing use of space is key and takes some talent.
I won't do it, but think it would be nice to have portables stored under counter to be pulled out and pushed back in as needed.
Portables can be replaced easily when/if needed...thinking longterm...just allot the space.

On another thread somebody had talked about the potential pain and questions of using a 1/4 berth for storage.
We have many new relatively inexpensive 'containerizing' 'efficient packing' plans and systems readily available. That market really bloomed in the past few years...meeting the need....some good stuff.

Again, it's personal.
And if you go too far with it - trying to perfect - you'll cut down on your chill time...
 

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The Discovery 32 is most likely pretty much a 'stick built' boat (ie not many liners, if any). So you are probably free to do whatever you like as long as you avoid disturbing structural stuff.

A friend recently installed an Engle fridge drawer.. sounds like what RU is mentioning above.. makes sense, you still have the cold conserving top load, and good containment when heeled and it frees up precious counter space if there's room for it somewhere.

You galley looks a little tight, maybe the nav table area needs an upgrade/repurpose while you're at it.
 

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S/V Calypso
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Things like this are truly personal...

Although I can make pizza that would kill you and me, I really have no real need for an oven. I think ovens are more of a chick thing.
Nice. A "chick thing".
 
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I know there were several ladies in the Florida Keys that loved to bake stuff, not just make pizza, which was fine with me when they came to my boat with loads of cookies, cakes, pies and fresh baked breads. I think, though, that they liked to experiment on this old man. Some of those cookies, especially the brownies, I suspect had more in them than I was aware of. ;) The fresh baked breads were absolutely awesome. One couple had a near solar oven on their boat and it worked very, very well on dry land, but on the boat it was marginal at best because of the boat's constant movement on the mooring buoy and it's failure to maintain the correct position with the sun. I sincerely believe that at one point while living aboard, I could have easily survived on the fish I caught, fresh baked bread and margarettas. ;)

All the best,

Gary :cool:
 

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Small counter top space is naturally cluttered, for me - a magnet for junk.
Kinda like my work desk...:)

Enlarge counter space and take away from lounging space....win/lose...

I will experiment with racks, net hammocks, etc.
I'll use the oven for some type of storage.
The top load counter fridge is there, so it will stay there, dedicated.
The portable freezer unit..prob 60ish qt will need to be fitted...somewhere.

I'll be working on some way to comfortably sleep in the cockpit.
 

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...

I think ovens are more of a chick thing.

...
Huh.

For what it's worth, I just returned from an offshore passage where the oven was used often by the male skipper. For cooking, not storage.
 

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Mermaid Hunter
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Things like this are truly personal...
This is about the only thing you posted in this thread that I can agree with. It's all downhill from here.

Myself, I don't like the top-load counter fridges/freezers because they take away counter space...duh..which can be used for scattered/unorganized space.
Ideally, on a mono hull, I'd like to have pull out fridge/freezer that's under dedicated disorganized space above.
Top-load refrigeration and freezer space is certainly a compromise but there is little disruption for an organized cook. Mise en place. Cooking is a fundamentally organized activity. To do otherwise is more time consuming, inefficient, and--at sea--can be dangerous.

Although I can make pizza that would kill you and me, I really have no real need for an oven. I think ovens are more of a chick thing.
That is an extraordinarily sexist statement. I think you owe our distaff members an apology, and while you are at it one to the males @T37Chef who you imply are incapable.

Fridge thing....
The portable fridge/freezers out now are pretty darn efficient.
People are spending a lot of money building in-counter, permanent installs to be efficient.
No. The portables are more efficient than portables used to be. They can't even come close to a properly installed, well insulated permanent refrigerator and/or freezer. Consider Ah/day/cu ft as an efficiency metric. @deniseO30

Small counter top space is naturally cluttered, for me - a magnet for junk.
Which makes your counter space ineffective for cooking, time consuming to secure to go sailing, and potentially a hazard underway.

I will experiment with racks, net hammocks, etc.
I'll use the oven for some type of storage.
That depends on what you are planning to store. Racks can be useful for cans, jars, boxes, and containers and of course pots and pans BUT you need a way to secure items. Racks and net hammocks may be okay for foodstuffs aboard a marina queen or a boat whose anchor is screwed to the bottom but underway you will make oranges into juice and apples into sauce. The most appropriate use for net hammocks is for clothes and children's stuffed animals.

The only items suitable for storage in an oven are permanent and disposable baking pans, and perhaps your cast iron bake- and cookware. Anything else gets in the way of the primary mission of the oven.

The capt may have felt it was safe because a woman was onboard to supervise in case there were problems.
Still, it's not recommended.
First, I am that skipper and I take personal offense at your boorish sexism. It takes some doing to offend both women and men in a single sentence. By the way Donna's role in the galley on this trip was once washing the dishes (once) and eating my food.

Second, "not recommended" by whom? You? What credentials do you have in either naval architecture or the culinary arts to make such a recommendation?

An oven aboard provides a tremendous amount of flexibility and greatly broadens options. While there are certainly stove-top expedients like a pressure cooker with no seal and the Omnia they are nowhere near as good as a real oven, even a small one.

I strongly recommend an oven with a thermostat on the lower burner and a broiler for anyone who plans to use their boat and cares about eating well. If a boat has an existing oven without a broiler definitely get a grill but offshore they tend not to be helpful; there are some other mitigations. If your oven has no thermostat get a good oven thermometer you can see through the window - people survived for centuries on that basis.

In a two week delivery discussed elsewhere in SailNet we used the oven for stuffed shells; lasagna; bacon; baked chicken; steaks; roasted cauliflower; roast pork loin with potatoes, carrots, and celery; and probably something else that slips my mind. I didn't get around to baking bread or making cookies this trip.

I commonly bake cookies when engaged by yacht brokers as a skipper for sea trials - the smell in the boat makes everyone happy and fresh cookies make discussion of issues found proceed with more civility. One local broker tells me my cookies have saved a couple of deals.

On one of the trawler forums I participate in there have been long discussions with participation by men and women about the selection and use of ovens.

On Facebook there is a "Cooking on a Boat" group that regularly addresses oven use.

In short, an oven is an important element in any kitchen or galley. To leave an oven out of galley remodeling plans is short-sighted. You might as well say that a toilet doesn't really need a seat.
 

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Daniel - Norsea 27
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Bill, if you don't plan on installing another oven, then the extra space could be used for either a cabinet or drawers. That alone shouldn't be too difficult. The comments about top loading box, I wouldn't worry about. The only counter space I have IS the door to the icebox. When it's closed, no problem. Just a matter of getting what you need and organizing before you prepare foods. to me, a minor issue.

Will it be just an icebox or will you be installing a fridge compressor system? Just have to plan out how much space you'll have left once the insulation is in place. I have seen some good fridge modifications. So, I think, it could be well worth it for the extra trouble.

Good luck to you.

A friend recently installed an Engle fridge drawer
I've heard good things about the Engle boxes. Another Nor'sea owner has one, a cooler type I think.

In a two week delivery discussed elsewhere in SailNet we used the oven for stuffed shells; lasagna; bacon; baked chicken; steaks; roasted cauliflower; roast pork loin with potatoes, carrots, and celery; and probably something else that slips my mind. I didn't get around to baking bread or making cookies this trip.

In short, an oven is an important element in any kitchen or galley. To leave an oven out of galley remodeling plans is short-sighted.
Good info, Dave.
During my refit, I've considered putting in an oven, not just for pizza, but for a lot of similar things you mentioned here. Not interested in cutting into my nice galley cabinetry right now, but it does make sense to keep it in mind. I don't look at it as losing storage space, but gaining another tool for cooking a wider variety of food.
 

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There's good news and bad news about a top loading refrigerator/freezer. The good news is they tend to me more efficient than front loaders because you don't completely dump all the cold air when the door is opened. Mine draws 5 amps when running, but on the thermostat, it only turns on for about 1 minute every 10 minutes, resulting in very little battery drain during the night. During the day, my solar panel keeps up with and charges the house batteries at the same time.

The bad news is you must be organized in the galley. That refrigerator lid is also part of the counter top, which is needed for preparing the meals. If you are not organized, this can be a problem, especially when preparing a meal during rough weather. There has been times when I had to heave the boat to in order to safely cook dinner, but once the boat was properly hove to, I had no trouble cooking.

With a front loading refrigerator/freezer, the newer ones tend to draw very little current, however, in rough seas, things tend to dislodge and bounce around unless they are housed in the door compartments. The open shelves are like any home refrigerator and things will slide all over the place, break and leak. Nice for dockside cruisers, bit not the best thing for coastal and offshore cruising.

My oven/stove combo is gimballed, which is fine when the boat is gently rolling, but worthless when the boat pitches. It, like most is only gimballed in one direction. I'm sure there are fully gimballed models available, but the strain on the gimbal must be incredible.

One of the neatest things that happened on my way home while cruising up the Georgia coast was when I went below to make lunch for myself and crewmember. 20nminutes later I returned to the cockpit with a cold beer, grilled hotdogs on toasted buns, with cheese sauce, relish, honey mustard and chopped onions, and some piping hot french fries. My sailing partner was elated. Said it was the best tasting lunch he had on a boat in years.

Good luck on whatever you decide upon,

Gary :cool:
 

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I am a male-type person and I love an oven. Obviously I don't have one on my Catalina 22, but when I charter I use the oven all the time.

A couple years ago I got a boat with a broken oven and it totally messed up our planned meals. We had to crumble up a frozen lasagna and pan fry it, for instance. My wife macgyvered something together with a large pot, some utensils, and aluminum foil to make a stovetop "oven" so she could make cookies.

I love to make an enormous breakfast sometimes. Eggs scrambling and bacon frying on the stovetop, while asparagus roasts, biscuits bake, and Cuban beans reheat in the oven.

Besides, there's the rumor that an oven will act as a Faraday cage and protect electronics from a lightning strike!
 

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Besides, there's the rumor that an oven will act as a Faraday cage and protect electronics from a lightning strike!


Yeah, I read that somewhere as well, but fortunately, never had the opportunity to test out the theory. ;)

Gary
 

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There's good news and bad news about a top loading refrigerator/freezer. The good news is they tend to me more efficient than front loaders because you don't completely dump all the cold air when the door is opened.......:
The portables are all top-load - it's just a matter of finding/creating space for them.
Square corners are sometimes hard to fit into curved spaces....efficiently.
The architects do well creating workable space, but it's never one size fits all.
I have the in-counter top-load fridge and want to add a portable freezer, so I'll either find unused or under utilized space, or repurpose some space.
When it's meant for the galley, ease of access is key....on a galley mission, don't slow me down.

Limited baking can also be done in a grill.
 

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Casual memory says that portable coolers--even the great ones--and reefer drawers still all have maybe half the insulation of a really *good* built-in top loader. Or can anyone find a spec from Engel or someone that contradicts that?

A good dutch oven or pressure cooker (which I never loved because you have to cook by rote, if you try to lift the cover to see how something is doing, you lose more time than the whole business saves) can certainly replace a conventional oven for many things. And using an oven as a faraday cage is, I'll concede, not the best way to protect electronics.

But still, if you like to BROIL FISH OR CHOPS, you can't do it the same way without a decent broiler. A black iron frying pan is all well and good, but not the same.

Of course a bag of Snickers obviates the need for any cooker at all, doesn't it?
 

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One of None
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"Work triangle" should apply to gallery layout imho
 

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Casual memory says that portable coolers--even the great ones--and reefer drawers still all have maybe half the insulation of a really *good* built-in top loader. Or can anyone find a spec from Engel or someone that contradicts that?.....
Good point.
What I've looked at is amp draw for both built ins and portables to keep a certain temp level, regardless of the thickness of insulation.
I've not yet found solid info that the built ins are surpassing the latest portables, but that's something to check...and to post about, please.
I've read reports from others who have the Adler Barbour Cold Machines saying the amp draw they experience is X, and that is greater than being reported on the new portables.
I have not gotten reports from new keel cooling systems.

Properly built built-ins, in my mind, should perform better than light weight and small footprint portables. I think a lot, if not most, of the current built ins are add-on fixes for something that people wanted to see improved.
 
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