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Hi all, I'm the proud new owner of a 1979 S2 11.0a. I'm doing little refit projects and at the moment my attention is turned to the galley sink and drain system.

It looks like the drain goes from the sink into a 1-1/2" pvc, into a 2" pvc coupling, into a 1" hose.

I can't help but assume this is a wacky installation and the oversized coupling connected to the 1" hose is creating a buildup and backing up the drain.

what do you guys think? Is this incorrect?

may be a small issue but I'm learning carefully with the thought of my corroded and seized through hole (in the open position).

Thanks.

Rob
S/V Sirius II

137977
137978
Pipe Wall Plumbing Gas Pipeline transport
Pipe Tool Nozzle Hose Plywood
 

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I think the drain should be larger... no smaller than 1 1/4" and better yet 1 1/2". BUT all that should be going down is water... and not a terribly lot of it.
 

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Speaking in terms of residential plumbing (which I did professionally long ago) that is a sh!tshow. But residential building code doesn't apply here.

You can use the slip fittings no problem. I would replace them all. Make sure the downstream drain is lower than the upstream drain and find a way to support the load that the drain hose puts on the horizontal piece. I would turn the end of the drain down before it reduces in size. What you have now is collecting solids under the lip. Nasty at best. Imminent clog at worst.

The size of the drain line is limited by the size of the seacock. Run a new hose so you don't have that coupler in the way which further restricts the flow.

Is that a grounding line connected to the seacock? If that grounds to your battery it is giving any stray current from the water a place to go and likely causing all of that corrosion. You want your thru-hulls to be isolated. You probably should inspect all the other thru-hulls as well.
 

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It really should all be the same size pipe, and dictated by the maximum size to fit the seacock. Remove the pipe on the seacock and see how you might be able to fit a larger pipe, then replace it all the same upwards. Why do you have to have a lashing on the sink drain?
 

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WE can assume that that the slip fitting on the sink drain is lashed on to prevent it from sliding off, falling below the wl and sinking the boat. Just shows how a little forethought can prevent problems.
 

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Is it me or does it look like the right sink is lower than the left one, and the drain from the right one has a negative slope. That means dishwater is going to sit in the drain under the right sink and allow all kinds of nasties to grow and stink!

Rip it all out and start again. Make sure there is plenty of slope towards the through hull. Stepping down the size is inevitable, but try to make the 90° turn down in the larger diameter, and then reduce it on the vertical. Reducing on the horizontal will allow water and debris to be trapped in the bottom of the horizontal pipe.

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I’m not bothered by the size of the drain hose, as there should not be solids going down it. Although, great advise on making the bend, before reducing. Soap scum will accumulate in standing water. Obviously, that thru hull and valve are highly suspect to be a sinking hazard.

I‘m not a fan of sinks that drain below the waterline, when the boat is upright, at anchor. They drain too slowly and, as another said, always have standing water. A hose split would threaten the boat, even at rest. When underway, outside the Bay, I typically close all sink drain thru hulls, sometimes excluding the galley. Ours are not below, when heeled, otherwise, they are just at the waterline. It reduces the potential at a critical time and prevents the leeward sinks from backing up seawater.

If one we’re going to consider a larger thru hull and this one is below the waterline, I’d relocate it.
 

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It is just a "standard" what was available at the time installation. It all probably could be redone neater etc. But all that really is wrong to me is that the valve handle needs to be replaced and a second clamp be installed at the valve.
 
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That is a real mess. The idea of cobbling together a Home Depot fix seems like a good way to void insurance coverage if it can be shown that the sink drain had anything to do with a sinking.

Starting at the drain, Marine East MarineEast -- Products makes an adapter that has female threads for standard sink drains. The last time I looked they were less than $7.00 each. Those are available with integral hose barbs for either 3/4"or 1" hose. Typically, sink drain hoses on boats are 3/4". Marine East also makes 3/4" and 1" tees MarineEast -- Products with integral hose barbs as well. This is below waterline use so the hose should have minimally polyester reinforcement (little white threads in otherwise clear hose).

The route to the seacock should be as straight as possible without dips that can trap water or create an airlocks.

The seacock should be replaced since I believe that the OP said it doesn't close properly. But beyond that, (and while it is hard to tell from a photo) the discoloration suggests that there might be electrolysis going on.

The only expensive parts are the seacock and thruhull.

Jeff
 
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But all that really is wrong to me is that the valve handle needs to be replaced and a second clamp be installed at the valve.
Agreed. My surveyor has always stressed that to me. He also tells me to have a wood plug secured at the location of any below waterline through hull. Cheap insurance.

-Doug
 

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Hi all, I'm the proud new owner of a 1979 S2 11.0a. I'm doing little refit projects and at the moment my attention is turned to the galley sink and drain system.

It looks like the drain goes from the sink into a 1-1/2" pvc, into a 2" pvc coupling, into a 1" hose.

I can't help but assume this is a wacky installation and the oversized coupling connected to the 1" hose is creating a buildup and backing up the drain.

what do you guys think? Is this incorrect?

may be a small issue but I'm learning carefully with the thought of my corroded and seized through hole (in the open position).

Thanks.

Rob
S/V Sirius II

View attachment 137977 View attachment 137978 View attachment 137977 View attachment 137978
Hi all, I'm the proud new owner of a 1979 S2 11.0a. I'm doing little refit projects and at the moment my attention is turned to the galley sink and drain system.

It looks like the drain goes from the sink into a 1-1/2" pvc, into a 2" pvc coupling, into a 1" hose.

I can't help but assume this is a wacky installation and the oversized coupling connected to the 1" hose is creating a buildup and backing up the drain.

what do you guys think? Is this incorrect?

may be a small issue but I'm learning carefully with the thought of my corroded and seized through hole (in the open position).

Thanks.

Rob
S/V Sirius II

View attachment 137977 View attachment 137978 View attachment 137977 View attachment 137978
Hi, we have refit several S2 boats, the most recent an 80 11a. It had the full size 1 1/2" hose directly draining vertically down to a dedicated through hull with seacock. We were in hellish waves many times on travels on the Great Lakes in MI and also spent a season in the Caribbean, again encountering some heavy weather. Never any problem whatsoever and always drained perfectly. That was the original installation done by Tiara (S2) and was also the same on all other 11a boats we encountered in our home waters, Holland, MI. Home of (S2). If you do not want to poke another hole in the bottom of the boat, I sure understand, but just thought I'd let you know what they did from 1980 on as far as we saw.
 

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Agreed. My surveyor has always stressed that to me. He also tells me to have a wood plug secured at the location of any below waterline through hull. Cheap insurance.

-Doug
I would never talk anyone out of doing this, but it's always perplexed me. For the dowel to work, you need a round hole to pound it into. Part of the reason they work is the soft wood swells, so they have to stay dry in the bilge.

First, where's the hammer? If I have to get that, why can't I have the dowel kit with it?

Second, what scenarios leave a nice round hole? If the hose slips off, you just close the thru hull. I suppose, if one hasn't maintained them and they won't close, the dowel would come in handy. Something sliding in the bilge and breaking it off won't likely leave a neat orifice for the dowel.

I like the product, StayAfloat. You can jam it in any size or shaped hole. I'll link it below. I also have the foam cones, but doubt they would work well. On the Crash Boat series, they tested a bunch of these. A crew member holding a pillow on the break, with their foot, was the best way to slow it down well enough for the bilge pump to handle and allow time for a more thorough repair.

I keep all my 'stop leak' supplies, which include all the above, plus underwater epoxy and the hammer, in a dedicated locker in the salon. Nothing else goes in there.

 

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I like the product, StayAfloat.
Great post. Thank you! Never heard of this stuff but will now check it out.

-Doug
 

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Another good new product is the sea stopper which I have used and written about on my site. SEA STOPPER (schooner-britannia.com) It really works on broken or stuck-open seacocks, and actually enables you to fit a replacement seacock, while still in the water.
 

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It appears to me--based on the standard size of kitchen sink drains--that your "1-inch" drain hose more likely 1/2-inch (inner diameter). That should work fine so long as you can keep debris out and minimize/eliminate the kinks. Since it's not under pressure, it probably doesn't make much difference if you use reinforced hose (such as the super-short piece right at the hard PVC adapters), but since the cost differential is minimal, I would. Of course, I'm certain that when you rework this, you'll use a long enough piece of hose that you won't need to cobble together short pieces with double-barb fittings, each of which introduces another potential point of failure.

Of greater concern is that "seacock" which actually appears to be an ordinary (non-marine) ball valve. The mild steel handle suggests this was purchased at a hardware store or plumbing shop and is likely brass (not bronze) and thus far more susceptible to galvanic corrosion (specifically, dezincification). Additionally, ordinary land-based plumbing tends to use NPT threads which are only partially compatible with through-hulls, which have straight (NPS) threads. While it's possible to get the two to work together, it won't be as strong as using components with matching thread configurations. (Similarly, you can force a fine-thread nut onto a coarse-thread bolt. But quite often, as you're doing so, you'll wind up with half a bolt still in place and the nut and other half the bolt laying in your hand. I suppose if you stop at just the right moment, you'll have not torqued the bolt in two, but how much have you weakened it? Is that really how you want to treat the hunk of bronze/marelon that's keeping the water on the right side of your hull?)

There's a good discussion on the topic of through-hulls and brass vs bronze fittings at marinehowto[.]com/seacock-thru-hull-primer/.

One thing that I always keep in mind when working with seacocks and through-hulls is the ABYC standard:
"A seacock shall be securely mounted so that the assembly will withstand a 500-pound (227-kilogram) static force applied for 30 seconds to the inboard end of the assembly, without the assembly failing to stop the ingress of water."
Would you feel confidant pulling on that installation with 500 lbs of force? Or even half that?
 
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