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As I search for the next boat, I find myself pondering the utility of double vs single-bay galley sinks. Looking at what's out there, the two bay configuration is obviously prevalent, but single bay galley sinks are creeping in. Maybe not unlike in residential application it is just a matter of preference (I like my big single compartment).

In practical terms, on a cruising sailboat that do long passages, what would be more useful or desirable?
 

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I have two side by side galley skinks. The small one is essentially used to "store" things... a few plastic poly deli/Chinese soup containers, a rack which has sponge and dish scrubber a bottle of 409 and Softscrub... all of these things are used in "cleaning". I like having all this stuff accessible and secure without having to go into a cabinet.

Our larger sink is not very large but adequate. I wash one dish at a time... do not stack dirty dishes because there is no need to clean the bottom of a plate or a bowl. I can fit the large pot in the sink and that's all that matters size wise.

I like the two sinks... small and larger. Replacing with one large sink would offer no advantage.

Cabinetry Tap Sink Countertop Blue
 

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At both of our homes we have a two-bowl (large and small) kitchen sink. The smaller bowl is supposed to be used for the garbage disposal, but my wife refuses to use it as such.

On the boat a two-bowl sink is invaluable. Both bowls are the same size, and the depth of the bowl is greater than any dimension of the side of their opening. While preparing a meal, one bowl is for washing/clean dishes, and the other is for dirty dishes. After breakfast, I put the coffee percolator with coffee in it in one bowl, and have the washed dishes drying in the other, as we get underway. If we open a >0.75 liter bottle (wine, water, olive oil, juice, etc.), it is stored in one bowl of the sink while underway. Stuff stored in the sink is readily available, and if there is a spill, it is automatically discharged and cleanup is a quick rinse.
 

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Hi,

I have double sinks in my boat (and on my previous boat). I use the large sink for dirty dishes. In the smaller sink I have a RV type dishrack. As I wash the dirty dishes they go into the dishrack to dry. Since there is so little counter space on my boat, the dishrack in the sink works well for me.

Barry
 

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I did an experiment to see, I wanted to get rid of one sink if I could, I was thinking slightly larger single. So I blocked the second one off. NOPE. Two sinks. Everything from a place to dump stuff coming aboard so it doesn't roll around to a place for the dish rack. I settled on a cheap but pretty with bright grain, hardwood cutting board that I will router the bottom as a plug of sorts, so the bottom will fit in the sink but the rest will not. Was cheaper to buy a pre made cutting board and waste some of it than just the raw wood to make one.
More important to me is to switch to under mount vs top mount. With proper fiddles on the counter edge it is so nice to have a place to wipe things into without picking at the edge after.

Oh I forgot, the one sink I am still considering is the big residential style two level but one bowl sink. Sailing Uma's interior video gave me the idea. The idea I was also thinking of and am definitely stealing from them is the routered grooves drainage area in the solid surface counter like we used to do in high end houses.
 

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We are very happy with our double under-mounted sinks. We have covers for both sinks so that we can have more prep surface, and the large sink has a cutting board mounted on one side of the cover.

One consideration about having 2 smaller sinks vs one large one is that if you are trying to conserve water it takes much less water to wash dishes in a smaller sink.


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Washing dishes on a boat
Wash one at a time. Place one dirty dish in the sink
Take a second dirty dish, a dish scrubber soaked with some dish soap. Turn hot water on a scrub dirty dish so the soapy water lands on the dirty dish in the sink. Rinse and place in drying area. Repeat. Do not fill sink with soapy water with all dirty dishes in the sink. Use foot pump for rinse water. Use a bit of hot water for washing. Don't stack dirty dishes... you don't have to wash dish bottoms. Limit use of hot water and dish soap.
 

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Washing dishes on a boat
Wash one at a time. Place one dirty dish in the sink
Take a second dirty dish, a dish scrubber soaks with some dish soap. Turn hot water on a scrub dirty dish so the soap water lands on the dirty dish in the sink. Rinse and place in drying area. Repeat. Do not fill sink with soapy water with all dirty dishes in the sink. Use foot pump for rinse water. Use a bit of hot water for washing. Don't stack dirty dishes... you don't have to wash dish bottoms. Limit use of hot water and dish soap.
Lol! Interesting technique!

I think I will stick with a couple of inches of soapy water in the sink.

If I really needed to conserve water I would just sit on the swim platform and wash them in the ocean!



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With two sinks you can wash the dirty dishes in one and let them drip dry in the other. No worries about them flying all over when the drying rack gets catapulted or jostled by a wave. KISS.
 

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I like one large sink because I can fit big pans with long handles down into it to wash them. To wash dishes, I have a dishpan that takes up a little over half the space in my big sink that has a drain with plug in the bottom of it just like the sink itself does. I wash dishes in the dishpan and rinse them off to the side and put them in rack that drains into the side without the dishpan. I think it's sort of the best of both worlds so I have a big sink when I want one but a smaller one to wash "normal" sized dishes in.
 

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I have twin sinks.
Because I do longer passages or at anchor for long periods, fresh water is a vital commodity being the only thing that really controls us.

So I have plumbed pressurised salt water into the sinks via a faucet and normal Jabsco ParMax 3 pump (no, no corrosion)

I can happily fill the large sink with salt water and do the dishes. I just use more detergent than fresh water. Any detergent (not only 'Joy'). I use 10 squirts from my pump bottle instead of 2 squirts for fresh water.

As I wash I stack on end in the smaller sing for them to drain a bit.
Then spray with a plastic spray bottle of fresh water and chuck into the drainer.

We easily do 2 months without water top-up, including showers. Its great not to be tied to some necessity to load water. A watermaker would be nice!! Next boat.


Mark
 

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I have twin sinks.
Because I do longer passages or at anchor for long periods, fresh water is a vital commodity being the only thing that really controls us.

So I have plumbed pressurised salt water into the sinks via a faucet and normal Jabsco ParMax 3 pump (no, no corrosion)

I can happily fill the large sink with salt water and do the dishes. I just use more detergent than fresh water. Any detergent (not only 'Joy'). I use 10 squirts from my pump bottle instead of 2 squirts for fresh water.

As I wash I stack on end in the smaller sing for them to drain a bit.
Then spray with a plastic spray bottle of fresh water and chuck into the drainer.

We easily do 2 months without water top-up, including showers. Its great not to be tied to some necessity to load water. A watermaker would be nice!! Next boat.


Mark
If fresh water is accessible doing a dock run to tank up is hardly a problem. You still need to use water sparingly. And yes a watermaker would change everything. One is not needed along the US East coast... the Islands are a different story.
 

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I have twin sinks.
Because I do longer passages or at anchor for long periods, fresh water is a vital commodity being the only thing that really controls us.

So I have plumbed pressurised salt water into the sinks via a faucet and normal Jabsco ParMax 3 pump (no, no corrosion)

I can happily fill the large sink with salt water and do the dishes. I just use more detergent than fresh water. Any detergent (not only 'Joy'). I use 10 squirts from my pump bottle instead of 2 squirts for fresh water.

As I wash I stack on end in the smaller sing for them to drain a bit.
Then spray with a plastic spray bottle of fresh water and chuck into the drainer.

We easily do 2 months without water top-up, including showers. Its great not to be tied to some necessity to load water. A watermaker would be nice!! Next boat.


Mark
Having had a little involvement in water testing around bays. Saltwater for dishes is a hard no for me now. I wish I hadn't done it, cause I'd still eat shellfish from those areas and I miss them. On a long passage or in a very remote anchorage I could see it.
 

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Having had a little involvement in water testing around bays. Saltwater for dishes is a hard no for me now. I wish I hadn't done it, cause I'd still eat shellfish from those areas and I miss them. On a long passage or in a very remote anchorage I could see it.
If I'm worried about the water quality I put 30 mils / 1 fluid ounce / 1 nip measure of bleach in the water and wait 5 minutes before washing.

Mark
 

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Two sinks totally. We have zero counterspace for drying dishes and I'm not gonna waste water filling sinks to wash and rinse. Our sinks are the size of small household double sinks. I wash in one moving to the other. Scrub the newly empty sink, and then rinse and use the clean sink to drain. If I'm cooking a lot, I catch the rinse water to use for washing the next batch of dishes. We do not have a watermaker. We do have both pressurized and foot pump fresh water. We do not have any saltwater pumps. We are firm believers in keeping the salt outside.
.
 

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Never found any advantage in two sinks, not at home and not in my boat. At both places I have a very large galley and would still like a single large and DEEP sink to take all the dirty plates including large trays etc. - and still be able to wash without moving items from one sink to the other. Reading here, people use the smaller sink as a place to hold detergents etc. - for that there are specific containers, you can move and stow away.

But as usual, most people support what they were always using - at home or in the boat.

The next question should be, how many people are using trash compactors… 😱
 

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At our house we use a dishwasher. Not so on the boat.
So you rest your clean dishes with the dirty? If not, would love info on how you manage both clean and dirty dishes in one sink .
Next question should be how many people are minimizing trash.
 

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At our house we use a dishwasher. Not so on the boat.
So you rest your clean dishes with the dirty? If not, would love info on how you manage both clean and dirty dishes in one sink .
Next question should be how many people are minimizing trash.
With one big sink I use a smaller, plastic dishpan sitting in that sink for collecting and washing dishes, but if more space is needed I can pick it up and set on countertop so larger sink is available.

I’m not sure what this has to do with sinks but since it was mentioned in prior 2 posts, I try to minimize waste by depackaging as much as possible on land and I also have a trash compactor that I find to be a great addition to a boat by cutting way down on the volume of trash. I’ve never understood why so few sailboat designers include a convenient space to put a decent sized trash bin!
 

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Back to sinks in the galley.
I didn't have a choice. Boat came with a tiny and a small sink side by side. Everything fits in the small sink except for one frying pan's hand. No biggie. I suppose the tiny sink could be used for draining/drying plates... but I have a better solution and I use the tiny sink for things I want handy when using the sink... and don't have to bother with looking in cabinets. For that purpose the tiny sink is brilliant on the boat. In some (many) cases a storage bin is handier than a cabinet with a door...and the tiny sink IS a storage bin... but with a drain so I keep the dish scrubbers, sponges etc. in it. The idea of filling a sink with water and placing all the dishes inside seems nuts. Washing one dish at a time doesn't waste water... but you don't want to stack dirty dishes before cleaning. A larger sink would hardly be more useful. What would I put in it? A tray or large oven pan can be cleaned using the small sink... And we do this rarely.
You realize that space is used very parsimoniously and intelligently on a boat. No space to waste!.
 
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